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Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

Have you ever been in a situation where you are being attacked by someone have a breakdown - I have and went away from it with clumps of my hair pulled out and severe bruises, including seeing one nurse who had her eye socket fracturewd by being assulted by a patient.  In a hospital setting that person IS RESTRAINED. 

What would you suggest they do to prevent him injuring himself or someone else?

Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@MalteseMomma wrote:

Actually i don't think that was "crying" we hear,I think he was still throwing a fit. As a grandma of a kid like this ,I think handcuffs in general may be needed, but to put them high up on his arms and behind his bck as shown in the picture ,well,that is abuse!

 


I'm sure this was done because standard handcuffs are too large for the wrist of a young child and they'd just slip them off.  Many small-boned women can do the same.

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,555
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I have a child with disabilities. To look at him you would never know. He contracted viral encephalitis when he was 7, went into grand mal seizures then a coma on full life support for 3 days. When he awakened, you think you will resume life - doesn't work that way. He was left with many brain disorders - seizures and temporal lobe damage.  He would walk into doors because he couldn't remember what a doorknob was for, couldn't zipper or button things. We spent a year re teaching him things. However, there was that damage that left him with outburst, out of control times. Trust Me I've been hit and had things thrown at me.  But, we were taught how to restrain him until we could calm him down - not easy. Puberty was worse! So many changes going on they can't control, and more aggressive! We did try special Ed classes but mainstreaming for other times didn't work for him. Eventually we had to find a facility for him for living and education. Finding that was a nightmare - he didn't fit into any special category, I.e. Autism. He's 37 now and resides at an adult facility - he still has times where he has to be restrained. Not with handcuffs - we keep a close eye on what goes on. One time it took 6 cops to hold him down and he still managed to give one a bloody nose - they were local cops and we knew all of them but you feel bad. Sometimes when they are out of control they are like raging bulls - so strong. Thank you for listening to my tale of woe - but life goes on and you learn how to accept the things you cannot change. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,262
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

Agressive children do not belong in classrooms with normal children. No one special needs or not should be permitted to kick, hit, or throw things at others. Crying over a non injured restrainrd child while having no sympathy for the kicked teacher or the innocent children forced to witness their teacher being attacked is shameful.

Super Contributor
Posts: 486
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

The child recently on the news was diagnosed ADHD (attention deficit hyperactive disorder).  As a teacher, I don't see a true diagnosis of ADHD as a disability but as a condition.  An actual diagnosis requires a neurologist to do it.  Any child diagnosed with that condition is then given some sort of treatment which should allow him/her to function in a fairly controlled way.  If the parents choose not to avail themselves of any treatment, the child will then have difficulties at school.  Each year up to 1/3 of my class has been diagnosed as ADD or ADHD.  That certainly is no excuse for a child to pull a fit.  Unfortunately, sometimes ADD or ADHD is used as an excuse (we hear often of some of these shooters being ADHD as though that partially explains their behavior) when the real problem is what I call DDD (discipline deficit disorder).  Most kids with ADHD or ADD are wonderful and work on compensatory techniques.  People who report about the poor behavior of kids/people and include the fact that they are ADHD give the majority of the population with ADHD a bad name.

 

All that being said, I can't imagine EVER needing to use handcuffs on a child.  Passive restraint is something some children need, the need usually presents itself early in their educational career, and parents can be informed ahead of time that this safe technique will be used if certain violent behaviors occur.

Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I notice that no one has offered an answer to what they think should have been done instead to prevent him injuring himself or someone else. I'm sure handcuffs were used because that was all that was available.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,433
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I know two special ed teachers who both had to retire early due to disability.

 

The disabilities stemmed from students who caused permananent damage while acting out.

 

One of them has to go to court because she is getting a decreased retirement payout.

 

I know another man who was in charge of a HUGE autistic kid. He was an older man and had to change schools.

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@guatmum wrote:

The child recently on the news was diagnosed ADHD (attention deficit hyperactive disorder).  As a teacher, I don't see a true diagnosis of ADHD as a disability but as a condition.  An actual diagnosis requires a neurologist to do it.  Any child diagnosed with that condition is then given some sort of treatment which should allow him/her to function in a fairly controlled way.  If the parents choose not to avail themselves of any treatment, the child will then have difficulties at school.  Each year up to 1/3 of my class has been diagnosed as ADD or ADHD.  That certainly is no excuse for a child to pull a fit.  Unfortunately, sometimes ADD or ADHD is used as an excuse (we hear often of some of these shooters being ADHD as though that partially explains their behavior) when the real problem is what I call DDD (discipline deficit disorder).  Most kids with ADHD or ADD are wonderful and work on compensatory techniques.  People who report about the poor behavior of kids/people and include the fact that they are ADHD give the majority of the population with ADHD a bad name.

 

All that being said, I can't imagine EVER needing to use handcuffs on a child.  Passive restraint is something some children need, the need usually presents itself early in their educational career, and parents can be informed ahead of time that this safe technique will be used if certain violent behaviors occur.

 

*****************************************

 

I pretty much totally disagree with your comments dismissing the disability and chalking it up to a lack of discipline.

 

So do the experts.  Example:

 

Sensory processing issues: Sensory processing challenges, often seen in autistic children and teens as well as many with ADHD, may cause kids to be overwhelmed by stimulation, and short-circuit in inconsolable meltdowns.

 

http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/articles/2013-10-29-why-do-kids-have-tantrums-and-meltdowns

 

 


 

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

There are many sources available on the subject, here's another:

 

ADHD & Kids: 9 Tips to Tame Tantrums

 

In kids with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), impulsivity manifests in many different ways.

 

And they can have tantrums. There are many reasons why kids with ADHD have meltdowns. For instance, “for many children with ADHD there is no internal understanding of ‘later.’ It’s now or now,” Matlen said. They have a hard time putting their wants and needs on hold. Because they’re kids, they’ve also yet to learn how to calm themselves or express their needs and emotions appropriately, she said.

 

http://psychcentral.com/lib/adhd-kids-9-tips-to-tame-tantrums/

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Honored Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

@151949 wrote:

I notice that no one has offered an answer to what they think should have been done instead to prevent him injuring himself or someone else. I'm sure handcuffs were used because that was all that was available.


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You are a retired nurse, I would think you had training on this.

 

You might also want to read the post from the member whose daughter handles these issues, I believe her name is Red Top.

 

The answer is: hire people trained to deal with it.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices