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Valued Contributor
Posts: 554
Registered: ‎09-22-2014

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@surfk wrote:

How it makes sense to anyone that its fine to handcuff a child in an educational setting is beyond me.

 

I can't think of any kid who is going to to learn (or even learn to behave) with his/her hands and/or legs restrained.

 

A special needs child who acts like this isn't always doing it due to something truly fully within his or her control anyway. Even what might be perceived to be a decision on their part is so complex that it isn't devoid of influence by his/her special need usually.

 

So if the behavior is so out of control or so dangerous as to require such treatment, obviously the classroom is not the place for that child - or for that child on that particular day when acting out.

 

If its a chronic thing endangering teachers, themselves and other students, then a better solution is to find a better solution than Gitmo tactics.

 

I mean, it is suppose to be an educational environment and not a lesson in torture techniques or prisonhouse restraint.

 

The entire situation would need to be reassessed regarding that student. And it should not be solely determined by the specific special ed teacher, let alone, the local police.

 

Its something that needs to be addressed in a more effective, meaningful and lasting way than a daily public humiliation and handcuff or rope burns. IMHO


 

Excellent post!  100% agree with you.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,849
Registered: ‎06-19-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

Handcuffs were wrong, especially so high up on his little arms but sometimes a teacher and or an aide is not enough if the child is violent, I don't care have trained the person is.  You can't just let a child go on a violent rampage and not call outside help.  Call the parent?  That's usually tried first but you can't always get them.  You'd be surprised at how many either won't answer their phones or they've changed their number without notifying the school.  To be honest, there are some parents that don't want to be bothered.

 

You have to consider the safety of the whole class, too.  I have been with a few students over the years who have thrown pencils, shoes, books across rooms, some knocked over desks tearing the whole room up.  We quickly evacuated the other kids from the room.  I've been hit and knocked down trying to calm a situation down.  One student, for no reason, caught me outside at dismissal on a snowy day, made a snowball and circled me, then threw it at me hitting me in the forehead.  Because he was sp ed, he only got one day suspension.

 

You try to talk a child down but you can't always do that.  Sometimes the public school setting is not the best for that child but to save money, that's where he/she is put.

"The quieter you become, the more you can hear". (By Ram Dass, an American Spiritual Teacher) \em>
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Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@RedTop wrote:

My oldest daughter has taught Special Education for nearly 15 years, and has restrained many of her students using state approved CPI measures.  She is a certified CPI instructor, and teaches these techniques in her school, and to other teachers in the county.  Regardless of the size of the child, there is a proper method of restraint to be used for the purpose of calming them down.  For every child she has to restrain, there is a protocol to be followed, which includes detailed documentation of the incident from start to finish.  Any of her classroom aides who witness or participate in the restraint incident have to document their involvement as well.  My daughter has had desks, chairs, iPads, etc., thrown at her in the classroom by students who decide to act out over the slightest thing.  Her response to seeing the video of this incident was that she would not restrain the child by that method.   Her response to the way the child responded, was that he reacted just like many of the students in her classroom once they realize they have gone too far, and are in big trouble.  


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Bless your daughter.  And you for raising such a wonderful person.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,758
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

What a horrible story and the video was hard to watch.

Keep Your Face To The Sunshine and You Will Not See The Shadow
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,580
Registered: ‎06-15-2015

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

 

 

What exactly does "disabled" mean nowadays? I used to think I knew who was disabled and who was not, but that line for me has become very blurry.

 

When I was in school ages ago, there were always kids that "acted out". Were they also disabled? I never heard anyone say that about them.

 

Now I hear and see many CAP letters used to decribe kids as being disabled. Does being on a requested prescription medication now equate to being disabled?

 

I did not like the video I saw of the handcuffing, especially behind the back placed on the childs bicep muscles. My understanding is that officer was called to handle "out of control kids".

 

I have no idea where or whom requested this officer, but my belief is this should be tracednto it's source, and I do not believe that officer is the source.

 

 

hckynut(john)
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,508
Registered: ‎12-22-2013

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

@surfk  this was a crisis situation; a child never sits restrained in a teaching situation.  From a glance, cuffs shouldn't have been at elbows because he seemed too skinny to present that kind of imminent danger.  Maybe his wrists were too skinny.  I'd like to know the kind of restraint Redtop was referring to. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

 

John, years ago, disabled usually referred to someone in a wheelchair or with mobility issues.  Now it includes a lot of other people, including children with issues that are medical and which can also affect their behavior.

 

Autism would be one example of children who may or may not need specially trained teachers and aides.

 

The decision is made by a doctor or other qualified person.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,932
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I saw one bit of this yesterday I believe, with the little kidlet being handcuffed up on his upper arms behind his back.

 

I'm not really easily shocked, but I found this shocking.  This was a little bitty kid - so small that the regular handcuffs fit on his little upper arms.

 

That cop standing there seemed like a real - I don't know - Just shaking my head.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

My understanding is that the child was flailing and beating and kicking the teacher and could possibly have injured her. He was not an autistic child - he had ADHD. He was capable of knowing what he was doing was not acceptable. What are they supposed to do, let him injure himself or the teacher? Should a teacher have to face bodily injury every day when she goes to work? 

Those who don't think the child should be restrained - what should have been done then in your opinion? 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,758
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@151949 wrote:

My understanding is that the child was flailing and beating and kicking the teacher and could possibly have injured her. He was not an autistic child - he had ADHD. He was capable of knowing what he was doing was not acceptable. What are they supposed to do, let him injure himself or the teacher? Should a teacher have to face bodily injury every day when she goes to work? 

Those who don't think the child should be restrained - what should have been done then in your opinion? 


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As a Medical professional, you would have approved handcuffing a child with handcuffs?  smh

Keep Your Face To The Sunshine and You Will Not See The Shadow