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Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,891
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

[ Edited ]

@stuyvesant wrote:

@Mindy D wrote:

I checked multiple databases and there are no studies done on this so far. Any answer is just a guess. My guess is that, unless you're using a very waxy substance that remains wet/waxy so that air particulates stick to it; you're probably OK. I did just finish reading an article from scientists that are only studying aerosolized COVID versus droplet. These scientists are calling for more openness  with the public about their findings. If you want to wash your hair after an outing, it can't hurt, but it's unknown whether it helps cut viral transmission.


There was something in the paper this morning about a new bacteria found in hair spray.  Old study, newly reported in the news.  Don't ask me to find it.  It's out there, it's all out there lol.


@stuyvesant I'll find it. What you're saying seems like a hairspray with bacterial contamination of the product. If you're speaking about bacteria found on the head hairs after spraying with hair spray, that would be different.  Which one do you mean? It's not unreasonable of you to think that organisms can stick to the hair when products are applied. The same thing could be said about products applied to the skin. Some might make it easier for pathogens coming from sources other than the products to remain on the skin. 

 

 

 


By the way, here the info on the scientists studying aerosol transmission. This is quoted from "The Guardian."

 

"In an open letter due to be published this week, 239 scientists from 32 countries call for greater acknowledgement of the role of airborne spread of Covid-19 and the need for governments to implement control measures.

WHO guidance states that the virus is transmitted primarily between people through respiratory droplets and contact. Aerosol transmission involves much smaller particles that can remain in the air for long periods of time and can be transmitted to others over distances greater than one metre.

Members of the WHO’s infection prevention committee have said that while aerosol transmission may play some role, there is overwhelming evidence that the primary routes of transmission are through direct contact and respiratory droplets expelled during coughing, sneezing or speech. They said introducing new measures to guard against aerosol transmission was unfeasible and unlikely to make much difference to the spread of infection.

The letter due to be published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases is authored by Lidia Morawska, of the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, and Donald Milton, of the University of Maryland, and has been endorsed by more than 200 scientists, including some who have been involved in drawing up the WHO’s advice.

They say emerging evidence, including from settings such as meat processing plants where there have been outbreaks, suggests that airborne transmission could be more important than the WHO has acknowledged.

Linsey Marr, an expert in airborne transmission of viruses at Virginia Tech and a co-signatory of the letter, tthat the WHO had relied on studies from hospitals that suggested low levels of virus in the air. This underestimated the risk, she said, because in most buildings “the air-exchange rate is usually much lower, allowing virus to accumulate in the air”.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,458
Registered: ‎06-10-2015

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

Great. We had COVID toes (being reconsidered), and now COVID hair. 

 

It's a virus, not a mosquito.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,093
Registered: ‎05-15-2010

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

@Mindy D Not the open letter.  This was a new bacteria discovered in hair spray.  It's just a curiousity, until you extrapolate.   

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,323
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

I found this: "Scientists in Japan have discovered a new species of bacteria that can live in hairspray, according to the results of a study published in the March (2008) issue of the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology."

Valued Contributor
Posts: 794
Registered: ‎04-20-2020

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

I think hair in a covid world needs to be analyzed by the professionals and I'm not talking about Chaz or Nick but someone who knows about particles that land on your head, your shoulders, etc.  

  

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,120
Registered: ‎03-29-2019

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?


@Mindy D wrote:

@stuyvesant wrote:

@Mindy D wrote:

I checked multiple databases and there are no studies done on this so far. Any answer is just a guess. My guess is that, unless you're using a very waxy substance that remains wet/waxy so that air particulates stick to it; you're probably OK. I did just finish reading an article from scientists that are only studying aerosolized COVID versus droplet. These scientists are calling for more openness  with the public about their findings. If you want to wash your hair after an outing, it can't hurt, but it's unknown whether it helps cut viral transmission.


There was something in the paper this morning about a new bacteria found in hair spray.  Old study, newly reported in the news.  Don't ask me to find it.  It's out there, it's all out there lol.


@stuyvesant I'll find it. What you're saying seems like a hairspray with bacterial contamination of the product. If you're speaking about bacteria found on the head hairs after spraying with hair spray, that would be different.  Which one do you mean? It's not unreasonable of you to think that organisms can stick to the hair when products are applied. The same thing could be said about products applied to the skin. Some might make it easier for pathogens coming from sources other than the products to remain on the skin. 

 

 

 


By the way, here the info on the scientists studying aerosol transmission. This is quoted from "The Guardian."

 

"In an open letter due to be published this week, 239 scientists from 32 countries call for greater acknowledgement of the role of airborne spread of Covid-19 and the need for governments to implement control measures.

WHO guidance states that the virus is transmitted primarily between people through respiratory droplets and contact. Aerosol transmission involves much smaller particles that can remain in the air for long periods of time and can be transmitted to others over distances greater than one metre.

Members of the WHO’s infection prevention committee have said that while aerosol transmission may play some role, there is overwhelming evidence that the primary routes of transmission are through direct contact and respiratory droplets expelled during coughing, sneezing or speech. They said introducing new measures to guard against aerosol transmission was unfeasible and unlikely to make much difference to the spread of infection.

The letter due to be published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases is authored by Lidia Morawska, of the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, and Donald Milton, of the University of Maryland, and has been endorsed by more than 200 scientists, including some who have been involved in drawing up the WHO’s advice.

They say emerging evidence, including from settings such as meat processing plants where there have been outbreaks, suggests that airborne transmission could be more important than the WHO has acknowledged.

Linsey Marr, an expert in airborne transmission of viruses at Virginia Tech and a co-signatory of the letter, tthat the WHO had relied on studies from hospitals that suggested low levels of virus in the air. This underestimated the risk, she said, because in most buildings “the air-exchange rate is usually much lower, allowing virus to accumulate in the air”.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great.

 

 

 

One more thing for people to freak out and panic about.

 

{insert eyeroll here}

The Sky looks different when you have someone you love up there.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,771
Registered: ‎05-15-2016

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

Most styling products have alcohol in it so...

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,611
Registered: ‎05-01-2020

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

I can't imagine going through life worrying about every little thing. Some perspective: not everyone gets this and not everyone dies - but if they do, it was their time.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 794
Registered: ‎04-20-2020

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

[ Edited ]

@GenXmuse wrote:

Most styling products have alcohol in it so...


And there it is....the bright light I was looking for.  Thank you and I hope it really does help. @GenXmuse 

QVC Customer Care
Posts: 2,884
Registered: ‎06-14-2015

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?