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Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,736
Registered: ‎02-19-2014

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

This is absolutely the most confusing thread. There are no studies that show what the title implies-that hair styling products attract Covid to you. I like a lot of what the OP has to say, normally. But this thread seems misguided and nonsensical to me.

 

You've got a study about bacteria (that hairspray manufacturers will simply kill with a preservative) -- which is not the Covid virus -- and you've got a study that talks about aerosolized Covid virus, which is something that happens during medical procedures like putting someone on a ventilator and has nothing to do with hairspray. And you're trying to somehow make it mean that hairspray attracts Covid? No.

 

If someone actively coughs droplets on your hair, yeah maybe don't touch it and take a shower once you get home. Otherwise, meh.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,604
Registered: ‎08-31-2019

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

When I'm going out where it may be hard to physical distance, like the grocery store, I simply tuck my hair into a baseball cap, so most of my hair is covered. It keeps me from feeling I need to wash my hair after every major outing.  

Valued Contributor
Posts: 794
Registered: ‎04-20-2020

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?


@BlueFinch wrote:

When I'm going out where it may be hard to physical distance, like the grocery store, I simply tuck my hair into a baseball cap, so most of my hair is covered. It keeps me from feeling I need to wash my hair after every major outing.  


@BlueFinch thank you for feeling what I have been feeling and if my hair fit, I too would put it into a baseball cap.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,733
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

I agree that the thread is confusing, but I'm not going to pin that just on @germanshepherdlove.

 

Three issues here: One, can hair attract the virus and if so, can you become affected? I think we pretty much all agree that the answer is no

 

Second, there is a new bacteria in hairspray. Not germane to the topic.

 

Last, the increasing focus on a different type of transmission -- tiny aerosol droplets that can last in the air for quite some time. I consider this very important in terms of our safety requirements. But it has nothing to do with hair.

 

JMO, but I think that the OP handled the "good griefers" very well.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,602
Registered: ‎06-17-2015

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

Where is everyone getting info regarding bacteria in hairspray???

 

The last article I find goes back to 2010.

 

Lots of things become contaminated; that is why there is a date on most make-up etc. - everything I own has that little box with the # of months the product is good for-even a can of mousse has the date.

 

I think this idea that the COVID-19 is "attracted" to your hair is a stretch.

If concerned, cover your hair and/or wash when you get home.

"" Compassion is a verb."-Thich Nhat Hanh
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,488
Registered: ‎04-18-2013

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?

I always shower at the end of the day and rarely use hairspray these days.

 

Even if I don't shampoo (because I don't do that every day) I totally rinse my hair out when I shower.  I am not going to think another thought about COVID in my hair.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,735
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Hair Styling Products attract aerosolized virus?


@suzyQ3 wrote:

I agree that the thread is confusing, but I'm not going to pin that just on @germanshepherdlove.

 

Three issues here: One, can hair attract the virus and if so, can you become affected? I think we pretty much all agree that the answer is no

 

Second, there is a new bacteria in hairspray. Not germane to the topic.

 

Last, the increasing focus on a different type of transmission -- tiny aerosol droplets that can last in the air for quite some time. I consider this very important in terms of our safety requirements. But it has nothing to do with hair.

 

JMO, but I think that the OP handled the "good griefers" very well.


Amen!  @suzyQ3 You have nailed it as far as this thread.

"Breathe in, breathe out, move on." Jimmy Buffett