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Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,302
Registered: ‎06-08-2016

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

It's an accurate story and it is about distribution.

Too tedious to explain here.

Locally, produce & meat suppliers only sell to restaurants.

They are not set up to sell to the general public.  It's generally either or, you sell to restaurants or you sell to the public.

 

The government gets in the way too.   In some cases the food regulations are so strict there are no alternatives.

 

One of the local meat distributors managed to sell curbside if you order in advance.   The grocery stores are keeping up so not sure how much business is going to wholesale.  So far, I've found everything I need at the grocery store,

 

I'm just glad that in this case donation was allowed.

 

When the restaurants finally open up, it will take a chunk of change to restock coolers, etc, because everything was lost when they were ordered to close.

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 28,635
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

Makes perfect sense.  Schools don't need food.  Restaurants aren't up and running like they were.  No sporting events where food is served.  Hotels aren't running like they were.  No cruise ships running.  

 

I just said in another thread I have no idea why supermarkets are limiting milk. There is no shortage.  Again, no milk going to all those businesses that normally buy milk.    

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,152
Registered: ‎02-05-2018

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

[ Edited ]

What a terrible waste.

 

Some of the restaurants where I am and where my parents are have become popup grocery stores. One catering company here offers boxes like a breakfast box of eggs, bacon, and cheese. Others are set up like farmer's markets, selling vegetables, meat, fish, and dairy.

 

They're making money and helping to keep the supply chain intact.

 

And a lot of the schools here are closed, but the cafeterias are still cooking and making meals available to the students who rely on school lunches. They have curbside pickup at locations all over town.

 

It would be great if farmers could donate that food to food banks. Maybe they can set up a way for the state, counties, or cities to buy the food wholesale for the food banks.

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,128
Registered: ‎01-02-2011

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

[ Edited ]

 


@Alison Wonderland wrote:

What a terrible waste.

 

Some of the restaurants where I am and where my parents are have become popup grocery stores. One catering company here offers boxes like a breakfast box of eggs, bacon, and cheese. Others are set up like farmer's markets, selling vegetables, meat, fish, and dairy.

 

They're making money and helping to keep the supply chain intact.

 

And a lot of the schools here are closed, but the cafeterias are still cooking and making meals available to the students who rely on school lunches. They have curbside pickup at locations all over town.

 

It would be great if farmers could donate that food to food banks. Maybe they can set up a way for the state, counties, or cities to buy the food wholesale for the food banks.


One of the local steakhouses is doing that.  

Local produce selection has been hit and miss at the markets.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,547
Registered: ‎03-29-2019

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

What surprised me when I read the article was just how much of our food is imported.

 

 

i can see not getting avocados, since they don't grow in the U.S., but tomatoes, zucchini, etc that we do grow here?

 

 

Something is wrong with that.

The Sky looks different when you have someone you love up there.
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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,848
Registered: ‎07-02-2015

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

[ Edited ]

If we want fresh produce year-round, we need to import it from warmer climates.  I've bought shrimp that comes from Viet Nam. Our favorite Campari fresh tomatoes are grown in Canada (probably in hot houses, because we get them from Costco  and sometimes from Kroger all year).

 

The story I originally posted on this thread showed photos of a Florida field of what seemed to be very nice zucchini and yellow squash that would have to be plowed under for lack of market.  Another Florida photo showed a farmer staring sadly at a field of tomatoes that can't be optimized in the marketplace.

 

The  pandemic took hold fast, economic change has happened fast, and farmers can't easily turn on a dime to create new customers for their goods.  It's sad but apparently true.

 

 

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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,636
Registered: ‎11-21-2011

Re: Food growers suffering loss as customers shrink demand

Grocery stores already have agreements with suppliers and when it comes to produce it probably isn't going to jump up that much from this. People who never ever cook are probably still ordering takeout a lot. 

 

And remember restaurants doesn't just mean dinners. There's cancelled parties, weddings, conventions etc, where people would have been fed