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Posts: 19,219
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Food brands and their parent companies

I think a lot of people are becoming more and more concerned about what they eat. Everything from the source of the food (particularly the country of origin), to how it is processed and what is actually in it. 

 

I have avoided Smithfield products since they were purchased by a company in China. People can agree or disagree with that choice, but the point of this post is more about how hard it can be to know what brands are now owned/operated by/private labels manufactured by other companies they you may be choosing to avoid or choosing to seek out and support.

 

Example. I have always purchased the Members Mark hams at Sam's Club. Loved the quality and taste. They were gone the last two times I went to Sam's, replaced with Smithfield brand. I asked a meat department person about the change, and he told me the Member's Mark were made by Smithfield anyway (made me a little sick to think that!). I told him I refused to buy a known Smithfield product. I also said I was trying to source as much uncured meats as possible, and he pointed to a new arrival (just in store a couple of days) called Pure Farms uncured ham. I was happy to give it a try.

 

Different than what we are used to, lots of fat, and bone in which is kind of a waste for me, but I was pleased to find a healthier option.Then I came to the computer this morning to research the product. 

 

Falls under the Smithfield family!

 

Ugh! It can be difficult to stand in a store, and choose a product when all these multiple brands and labels are really owned or produced by the same major company. Seems a little dishonest. Companies are buying up other brands all the time and many of the brands we felt comfortable supporting or eating are no longer made by the same parent company we thought (or in the same place or with the same ingredients).

 

Part of my solution has been to eat closer to nature and more whole foods, less processed. But everyone isn't going to do that, and even those that do, want to easily know the source/manufacturer of their foods outright without a bunch of smoke and mirrors and hiding of the actual source or manufacturer. 

 

I'm frustrated trying to keep a score card about who owns what and who has bought out what other brands. I know we can always opt for more locally raised meat, but I've pursued that in a couple of small shops here, and I'm not at all happy with the quality, especially for the high price.

 

So, just frustrated to have to work so hard to find brands that I'm trying to avoid, just keep coming up with new brands to market to me, and hide the facts about who they really source from.

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Posts: 4,779
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: Food brands and their parent companies


@mominohio wrote:

I think a lot of people are becoming more and more concerned about what they eat. Everything from the source of the food (particularly the country of origin), to how it is processed and what is actually in it. 

 

I have avoided Smithfield products since they were purchased by a company in China. People can agree or disagree with that choice, but the point of this post is more about how hard it can be to know what brands are now owned/operated by/private labels manufactured by other companies they you may be choosing to avoid or choosing to seek out and support.

 

Example. I have always purchased the Members Mark hams at Sam's Club. Loved the quality and taste. They were gone the last two times I went to Sam's, replaced with Smithfield brand. I asked a meat department person about the change, and he told me the Member's Mark were made by Smithfield anyway (made me a little sick to think that!). I told him I refused to buy a known Smithfield product. I also said I was trying to source as much uncured meats as possible, and he pointed to a new arrival (just in store a couple of days) called Pure Farms uncured ham. I was happy to give it a try.

 

Different than what we are used to, lots of fat, and bone in which is kind of a waste for me, but I was pleased to find a healthier option.Then I came to the computer this morning to research the product. 

 

Falls under the Smithfield family!

 

Ugh! It can be difficult to stand in a store, and choose a product when all these multiple brands and labels are really owned or produced by the same major company. Seems a little dishonest. Companies are buying up other brands all the time and many of the brands we felt comfortable supporting or eating are no longer made by the same parent company we thought (or in the same place or with the same ingredients).

 

Part of my solution has been to eat closer to nature and more whole foods, less processed. But everyone isn't going to do that, and even those that do, want to easily know the source/manufacturer of their foods outright without a bunch of smoke and mirrors and hiding of the actual source or manufacturer. 

 

I'm frustrated trying to keep a score card about who owns what and who has bought out what other brands. I know we can always opt for more locally raised meat, but I've pursued that in a couple of small shops here, and I'm not at all happy with the quality, especially for the high price.

 

So, just frustrated to have to work so hard to find brands that I'm trying to avoid, just keep coming up with new brands to market to me, and hide the facts about who they really source from.


Sorry for your frustration, however most large companies market  under different brands because they are going for a different market not to hide the name of the parent company.

Don't be so afraid of dying that you forget how to live.
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Food brands and their parent companies

I just think that, in general, processed foods are unhealthy.  I was told once by a dietician that if there is more than one ingredient in a food, then it's not healthy and I shouldn't be eating it.  I do think that's a little extreme, of course, but I got the "drift."  I eat mostly fresh vegetables and fruits.  I do add some protein sources to my salads, but I completely avoid processed meats, and I try to avoid  as many "packaged" items as possible.....but I'm no saint!

Laura loves cats!
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Re: Food brands and their parent companies

There's a big frozen vegetable recall from Walmart - amazing the number of brands involved that came out of one processing plant.

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Re: Food brands and their parent companies

@2blondeBINGO!  You said just what I do. Stay as close to whole food as possible and you'll feel so much better. Keep processed foods to a minimum. My favorite section of the grocery store is the produce department.

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Re: Food brands and their parent companies

@Virgo Girl  You virgos are so smart!  I know how picky you are (some of my best friends are virgos).  This is coming from a health and exercise conscious sagittarius!

Laura loves cats!
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Re: Food brands and their parent companies

I'm very fortunate to have local sources for almost all my food needs.   I can't do it exclusively but I do try to buy local every chance I get.

 

Milk & bread are typically produced locally due to the shelf life.    

 

There are only a few food companies in the US.    They own other companies not to hide but to diversify.    And it's all big business, has little to do with nutrition.

 

I appreciate the current administration wanting to keep jobs in the US, but it's also important to me that we keep our FOOD in the US as well.

 

 

@mominohio

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Re: Food brands and their parent companies

@mominohioI'm not as zenophobic as many are, so I don't care as much about where the company owners make home as I do where the products are produced.

 

  If I were going to buy Smithfield (never have to the best of my knowledge), I wouldn't really care who owns it, but I would want it produced in a country with good food regulations.  Right now the US is ahead of China on that, so that's what I'd look for right now.  I suspect I'll be gone before we fall back or they catch up when it comes to food safety.

 

 

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Re: Food brands and their parent companies


@millieshops wrote:

@mominohioI'm not as zenophobic as many are, so I don't care as much about where the company owners make home as I do where the products are produced.

 

  If I were going to buy Smithfield (never have to the best of my knowledge), I wouldn't really care who owns it, but I would want it produced in a country with good food regulations.  Right now the US is ahead of China on that, so that's what I'd look for right now.  I suspect I'll be gone before we fall back or they catch up when it comes to food safety.

 

 


 

@millieshops

 

I hear what you are saying, and it makes sense. But when it comes to China and food, they don't have a good enough track record in my opinion to trust them. Many will say that Smithfield products are being sourced and produced here like before, and I won't deny or confirm that, but for me, I don't trust a company based in China to be totally forthcoming with any changes that may happen with that process. I'm just going to avoid their products when possible, to be sure.

 

 

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Re: Food brands and their parent companies



I am careful about my spices origins. Garlic powder for some crazy reason is for a lot of big companies (McCormick etc.) manufactured in China. I am careful to buy it locally. I use a lot of Middle Eastern spices and I check to make sure they are from the Middle East with companies I know.