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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Fissure Filled Rubies?

[ Edited ]

The first row is ultrasonic, then steam cleaner or putting the item in boiling water.steamshine.JPG

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@Moonchilde wrote:

@IamMrsG wrote:

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.  

We must be reading the same info - I just read all the same. I was like wow and ugh about the glass. Unhappy surprise after a cleaning.


For most of my adult life I’ve had the theory that the way to shop for quality is to start at the top.  Find out what the very best looks like, feels like, how it is constructed.  Then, when you step down incrementally as the budget requires, you know what to look for and, more importantly, what to avoid.

 

That is why I went to work in a fine jewelry store.  I listened to my boss, a graduate gemologist.  I looked at gems under a microscope, learning something about artificial treatments and flaws such as fissures and inclusions.  So, @Moonchilde,  I am not sure what you read or where you found it, but, with my smattering of gemology knowledge, your source about glass filled stones is accurate.

 

Strive for respect instead of attention. It lasts longer.
Respected Contributor
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@Drythe wrote:

@fortune

 

Did you ever find out?  Most anyone purchasing a ruby, or any other stone, would want to know.


@Drythe

I don't have the item numbers for the ruby rings I have, and they are no longer in stock.  So, I can't find out.  But, before I purchase any other rubies from QVC, I'll try to find out about the fissure-filled treatment of that particular stone!  IMO, this info should be included on-line with the item description!

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@Kachina624 wrote:

Chuck Clemency has been selling a lot of rubies and I haven't heard him mention it.  I've also bought them from Michael Vallatuti and didn't hear him mention it either, 


@Kachina624

Who are these gentlemen?

Respected Contributor
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@SilleeMee wrote:

Assume all stones are treated unless it specifically states that they are "natural and untreated". Smiley Wink


@SilleeMee

I consider fissure-filled rubies less than "treated" stones.  They are almost in the "fake" category for me.

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@fortune wrote:

@SilleeMee wrote:

Assume all stones are treated unless it specifically states that they are "natural and untreated". Smiley Wink


@SilleeMee

I consider fissure-filled rubies less than "treated" stones.  They are almost in the "fake" category for me.


I totally agree with that! @fortune

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@fortune wrote:

@Kachina624 wrote:

Chuck Clemency has been selling a lot of rubies and I haven't heard him mention it.  I've also bought them from Michael Vallatuti and didn't hear him mention it either, 


@Kachina624

Who are these gentlemen?


@fortune  They are the primary sellers of gemstones on Evine. 

New Mexico☀️Land Of Enchantment
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@Trinity11 wrote:

@songbird wrote:

Said this before.  Get a GIA lab report with each ruby. 


I agree but unless the consumer is purchasing something expensive, GIA rarely provide that information....in fact GIA does not grade rubies.

 

Fortunoff refuse to carry fissure filled rubies and I own a few of their rings and earrings. They also refuse to carry diffused sapphires because the color often breaks down over time.


That's correct and @songbird is correct also.  The GIA will give you a report

 

GIA doesn’t grade rubies. GIA Gemological Identification Reports assess the characteristics of a ruby (weight, measurements, shape, cutting style and color), say whether it is natural or synthetic, indicate any detectable treatments, and give an opinion on geographic origin, when possible.

 

https://www.gia.edu/gia-faq-gia-grade-rubies

*Call Tyrone*
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Re: Fissure Filled Rubies?

[ Edited ]

Ruby, sapphire, emerald and paraiba tourmaline all qualify for a GIA Colored Stone Origin Report. However, that does not mean GIA will be able to determine a country of origin in every instance.

 

How does GIA test colored stones?

 

For each item submitted, a gemologist uses a battery of traditional and advanced instruments to perform a variety of analytical investigations, including microscopic examinations, and tests to determine an item’s gemological identity and detect any treatments. The process is independently repeated by a second gemologist, and may be further examined by additional gemologists and researchers as needed.

Learn more about how GIA identifies colored stones.

 

Can I submit a mounted colored stone for analysis?
 

Yes. Analysis needed to produce a GIA Colored Stone Identification Report, Origin Report, and Analytical Report can be performed on mounted colored stones.

 

Does GIA grade sapphires?
 

GIA doesn’t grade sapphires. GIA Gemological Identification Reports assess the characteristics of a sapphire (weight, measurements, shape, cutting style and color), determine natural or synthetic, indicate detectable treatments, and can issue an opinion on geographic origin, when possible.

 

https://www.gia.edu/gia-faq-analysis-grading-test-colored-stone

 

https://www.gia.edu/gia-faq-grade-sapphires

*Call Tyrone*