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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,010
Registered: ‎08-29-2010

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.

 

 

 

Strive for respect instead of attention. It lasts longer.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,504
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

@IamMrsG wrote:

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.

 

 

 


 

We must be reading the same info - I just read all the same. I was like wow and ugh about the glass. Unhappy surprise after a cleaning.

Life without Mexican food is no life at all
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,554
Registered: ‎03-21-2010

Said this before.  Get a GIA lab report with each ruby. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,954
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

On the Evine site it says on the product pages for Chuck's pieces the stones are enhanced or filled.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,161
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

If you want to try some inexpensive fissure-filled rubies, go to Shop LC.  You will get an idea of what they are like without taking out another mortgage. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,968
Registered: ‎03-17-2010

@IamMrsG wrote:

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.

 

 

 


Speaking of sonic cleanings, it seems that no jewelry store will bother with doing any other kind of cleaning.  I purchased an Affinity ring that is made up of tiny, tiny multi row paved diamonds.  As expected one fell out.  I took it to the local jeweler and they replaced the micro-diamond and then used a sonic cleaner to clean the crud left behind from the repair.  On the way home I lost another micro diamond~!  Took it back to the jewelers and asked them to repair the new loss and not use a Sonic Cleaner!  Said they won't do that, that there's no other way to clean the ring once the repair is done..... 

 

Oh really.... what on earth did Jeweler's do prior to the invention of the Sonic Cleaner in the 1930's??

 

Needless to say, it'll probably be my last micro-pave' purchase (and these type of rings are everywhere.)

*~"Never eat more than you can lift......" Miss Piggy~*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 20,648
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I would like to think that if they are fissure-filled that it would be disclosed.  That only seems right.

 

I have heard that on other channels which, of course, is a huge turn off.   Fissure-filled is just because the quality of the stone was so bad that the only way to make it saleable was to do this.

 

I love good quality rubies and remember back when Evine was ValueVision and they sold THE best quality fine jewelry and loose stones.  I have a number of loose Burmese rubies from the Ramseys, as well as some pieces including a pair of 18k gold Burmese ruby stud earrines that are positively stunning.

 

These days, I guess quality is too expensive for the shopping channel  targeted audience and now, even the now-called Evine sells more costume than fine jewelry.   Glad I'm not shopping fine jewelry anymore.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,603
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

@songbird wrote:

Said this before.  Get a GIA lab report with each ruby. 


I agree but unless the consumer is purchasing something expensive, GIA rarely provide that information....in fact GIA does not grade rubies.

 

Fortunoff refuse to carry fissure filled rubies and I own a few of their rings and earrings. They also refuse to carry diffused sapphires because the color often breaks down over time.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,603
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

@Q4u wrote:

@IamMrsG wrote:

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.

 

 

 


Speaking of sonic cleanings, it seems that no jewelry store will bother with doing any other kind of cleaning.  I purchased an Affinity ring that is made up of tiny, tiny multi row paved diamonds.  As expected one fell out.  I took it to the local jeweler and they replaced the micro-diamond and then used a sonic cleaner to clean the crud left behind from the repair.  On the way home I lost another micro diamond~!  Took it back to the jewelers and asked them to repair the new loss and not use a Sonic Cleaner!  Said they won't do that, that there's no other way to clean the ring once the repair is done..... 

 

Oh really.... what on earth did Jeweler's do prior to the invention of the Sonic Cleaner in the 1930's??

 

Needless to say, it'll probably be my last micro-pave' purchase (and these type of rings are everywhere.)


I had the same issue with a bracelet made in China that had diamonds in it. The quality of workmanship is far different than the goods coming out of Italy. I would never again buy anything from China in the way of jewelry due to frequent issues with the pave diamond work.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,596
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@Q4u wrote:

@IamMrsG wrote:

Although it is a very common practice, I personally think it is unethical to withhold information that a stone has been filled.  It is one thing to heat treat a gem to intensify its color and clarity; however, fissures (cracks) are serious flaws.  Glass fillings are not stable and can be jarred loose by exposure to sudden temperature changes, sonic cleanings or by being dropped.

 

 

 


Speaking of sonic cleanings, it seems that no jewelry store will bother with doing any other kind of cleaning.  I purchased an Affinity ring that is made up of tiny, tiny multi row paved diamonds.  As expected one fell out.  I took it to the local jeweler and they replaced the micro-diamond and then used a sonic cleaner to clean the crud left behind from the repair.  On the way home I lost another micro diamond~!  Took it back to the jewelers and asked them to repair the new loss and not use a Sonic Cleaner!  Said they won't do that, that there's no other way to clean the ring once the repair is done..... 

 

Oh really.... what on earth did Jeweler's do prior to the invention of the Sonic Cleaner in the 1930's??

 

Needless to say, it'll probably be my last micro-pave' purchase (and these type of rings are everywhere.)


There is a list of gemstone that should not be used in ultrasonic cleaners, we had the list mounted above the machine.  Yes, you can clean them with a soft tooth brush or cloth and blow the debris with a steam cleaner.