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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,396
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

I have single pane windows. In the Northeast where we only have 2 months of summer. Seems the Northeast has morphed into Canadian weather.

 

Rebates or tax credits only help if you have the 10 grand to put out to have all new windows put in. My windows will remain single pane until the money is grown in my wallet HA!

 

I shut the doors to cold rooms, enter at your own risk Smiley Happy Rooms are not used so it is no biggie to shut them off.

 

This thread made me think of my Grandma's house. In her house, only the kitchen was heated. That was because her stove was also a heater. She would put a fan in the door to the "parlor" (that room where no one was allowed to actually hang out? Remember those? Could look but don't sit in there! It was for company only Smiley Happy)

 

I LOVED LOVED sleeping over her house! Even if the upstairs was not heated. We (1,2 or 3 grandkids, whoever went over) would all just pile into one bed. Many kids in one bed made for warmth and giggling.

 

If we could only know how great those days were when we were living them, and not 50 years later!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 20,019
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?


@ID2 wrote:

Cover my windows with blankets? Ummm no. Never even heard of this being done. With todays technology, thermal windows and insulation we certainly don't have to live like they did at the beginning of the last century.


 

 

This is a rather elitist response.

 

I'll admit, the question in the OP kind of threw me at first. While I remember people in my childhood doing things like this, we didn't have to at my house growing up, but a couple of my first apartments did need such things done. I remember covering windows with plastic, and stuffing rags in some windows to try to keep the cold at bay.

 

I guess I had forgotten that not everyone has nice new, thermal windows, good doors and central heating systems, even in this day and age, but they in fact, do not.  Not everyone can spend hundreds of dollars a month on heating bills, and they do what they have to to keep warm. 

 

A good reminder, to be thankful I'm not there.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,857
Registered: ‎06-24-2012

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

 

Shop blankets for your windows on Easy Pay > Today's Special Value

 

At Home with Jill...

 

 

 

Super Contributor
Posts: 494
Registered: ‎05-16-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

I'm enjoying reading your stories, and replies!

 

Yes, this is an older brick house, built in the early 70's. It's a rental, so I can't do much with it. But I don't complain. There are those far worse off. I'm thankful I have a roof over my head, and a warm house---it stays between 57-70 which I find quite comfortable. There is central heating and air, but I don't like the heat since it drinks electricity, and the air rarely gets used---only if it's 95-100 or extremely humid. I have a gas fireplace that I turn on until I get hot or the living room is near 70. The house stays comfortable. I love a cool room with heavy covers. I guess it's like being a kid at my grandmothers home. I like that the house isn't sealed tight like modern day homes. I feel the house can breath.

 

My little town (roughly 2,000 spread out and maybe 1000 in "downtown") is in an Appalachian valley. If it weren't for the trees I could see all the mountains around me. When it gets cold it seems to whirl around in the bowl. While not a poor town, anymore--it used to be a mill town with a train running through "downtown" about 1/4 mile down the road from me--most homes are old. Some date back to the early 1900's, I'm sure if I researched hard enough some could date back to the 1800's.

 

I have extremely sensitive eyes. For some reason they stay dilated. (I've gone to an optom since I was 10. He finds it interesting how they react to low light so well.) It's just the way I was built. Dilated eyes + dry eye (blood shot) = a joke I've heard my whole life. Never touched drugs and I only drink water, milk, and juices, so I just let the jokes slide off.) That being said, I welcome the dark house. I have Luminara candles that flicker, and overhead lighting to keep it lit. When it gets warm it's like a call to spring clean when the blankets are removed.

 

We used the window film as a kid. I tried to help and burnt a hole in a corner. I don't know what was warmer, the hairdryer or my tail! LOL

 

I don't really care for the plastic. The blankets can be pulled over with a curtain tie if I need a breeze......I let the toast get too toasty Smiley Wink Plus cold comes in spurts here. It was 14 and snowing (SNOW....HERE....Whoot!!) yesterday afternoon. Monday it's supposed to be mid 50's. Christmas it was 75. This way, I can open the windows if need be. I feel trapped with the plastic.

 

I should note, there aren't many windows in the house. In fact, ONE per room (only 4 windows in the entire house). The standard 30" x 45" double hung singe paned windows. All on the front or back, east and west. S, its not like blankets cover the walls.

 

My set up: I have 2" faux wood blinds, closed, sheers, then the blankets are attached to the curtain rod with a binder clip behind the curtains, then thumb tacked to the side of the molding next to the wall. It just looks like the curtain's are closed. If I want to let in light or a breeze I can just un-tack one corner, and pull it over with curtain tie.

Super Contributor
Posts: 494
Registered: ‎05-16-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

Smiley Very Happy That mad me giggle. I have bought a few from Jill during YHJ! Though none have made it to the windows. The windows get the "hand me downs". The new cozy ones are either on a bed or on the sofa.

 

I'm kicking myself for only getting one set of the ED on Air fluffy + mink blankets (H206181). Talk about cozy. They sold out in Nov and haven't came back. I think it was a limited run. Smiley Sad

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,633
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

I'm glad we put certain things into place when we moved into our home- like a programmable thermostat and double paned windows and insulation in the walls because by doing that we saved hundreds of dollars on our heating bills.

Having the opportunity to convert to natural gas heat vs oil heat also enabled us to save even more $$ on heating bills.

 

Its not elitist, its good common sense and replacement windows have many different pricing tiers for everyone's budget.

☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,325
Registered: ‎03-13-2012

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

Well, now I am WAY curious. 

 

What at do people in Pennsylvania cover up with? 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 32,293
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

Sorry, but where I live some people don't have a budget for any kind of new windows.  Not after they scrape together enough to pay for the gas and electricity. And the car and the food.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,180
Registered: ‎01-20-2011

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?


@SeaMaiden wrote:

Who has single paned windows anymore? I do not think they even make them.


                I do, that's who,LOL. I live in my grandmother's home. It is a beautiful very old home with big Windows and original wavy bubbled glass (except for a few panes). I love those windows and just won't replace them. With those windows,super high beadboard ceilings, and original plaster walls, my heating bills are pretty high. I pay it and endure some drafts because it sure is a beautiful house.  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,605
Registered: ‎07-11-2010

Re: Do you cover your windows with blankets?

Update: I spent a couple hours putting bubble wrap on some of our apt. windows yesterday and it made a noticable difference in the room temperatures this morning. It really works!

I promise to remind myself every day that I am strong, courageous, and resilient.