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Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Detroit has peaked

[ Edited ]

I hope he is able to return home soon @Grailseeker . They turned our track and field stadium, into a 500 bed, field hospital.

 

One of my friends grandson's is an occupational therapist ,and he has volunteered to help wean patients off their ventilators. I am keeping my fingers crossed the worst is behind us ,and none of it will be needed.But it is there, and I am not sure if they are using it

 

Just when you let your guard down, things can happen ,so we must still be very careful

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,163
Registered: ‎07-18-2010

Re: Detroit has peaked

[ Edited ]

@cherry wrote:

I hope he is able to return home soon @Grailseeker . They turned our track and field stadium, into a 500 bed, field hospital.

 

One of my friends grandson's is an occupational therapist ,and he has volunteered to help wean patients off their ventilators. I am keeping my fingers crossed the worst is behind us ,and none of it will be needed.But it is there, and I am not sure if they are using it

 

Just when you let your guard down, things can happen ,so we must still be very careful


The worst is still here, we all stayed home to slow the infection rate so hospitals would not be overwhelmes.  Only about 1-2% of the population has gotten it and it is terrible infectious.

 

If we don't do something different, it will be right back with high death rate.  The slowing down is only because we keep distance and stay home.  We don't have a vaccine yet.

 

 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 559
Registered: ‎05-19-2014

Probably not. There are not even tests so they don't even know who is positive let alone an accurate number for new cases.

Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎12-05-2012

I live in the Detroit area and at best I am hoping we have plateaued. We are not on the downward side of this by any means. Testing is not easy obtain and as of last week it took 5 days to get the results.

 

At the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor the in-hospital admitted rate  increased daily until about 4-5 days ago when it  started to hold steady at around 220. The discharge rate is between 6-10 a day so that many new admissions must be taking their beds.

 

The most current concern is the rate of infection in nursing homes and other long term care facilities. Medical students are in several homes testing all the staff and residents.  Of those who  are tested it was reported that 35 % came back positive. I am not sure how pervasive that testing is yet.

 

It is very discouraging but hoping that our strict mitigation will turn the tide soon!

 

They admitted their first know Covid-19 patient around March 9 at U of M.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
 ABC12 News Team | 
   

LANSING (WJRT) (4/15/2020) - The number of newly confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths in Michigan fell again Wednesday to just over half of the peak.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services reported 1,058 new cases statewide, which is down from more than 1,300 cases confirmed on Tuesday. Michigan now has 28,059 confirmed cases.

The number of deaths attributed to coronavirus statewide increased by 153 on Wednesday, which is down from 166 on Tuesday. That brings Michigan's total number of coronavirus deaths to 1,921.

The number of new coronavirus cases in Michigan peaked at more than 1,900 on April 3 and the number of deaths per day reached a high of 205 on April 10.

Genesee and Saginaw counties both saw slight day-to-day increases in the number of newly confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths.

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

from the Free Press

 

r. Valerie Vaughn, 35, a hospitalist, and lead of a moderate-care unit for coronavirus patients at Michigan Medicine. She also is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan Medical School. (Photo: Joe Hallisy/Michigan Medicine)

 

At Michigan Medicine, Dr. Valerie Vaughn, a hospitalist who also is an assistant professor at the U-M Medical School, said emergency surgeries never stopped, but now, "we’re starting to do more of those semi-urgent surgeries, the cancer surgeries. We’re in the process of talking about doing those now because that also hurts people if we're having to delay those things.”

Although hospitals are starting to ease into more surgeries, Vaughn said that doesn’t mean it's a good idea to loosen all the restrictions Whitmer has put in place to slow the spread of the virus.

“If we just open up the state immediately, a lot more people are going to die,” said Vaughn, who was the co-medical director in converting a regular hospital unit into Michigan Medicine’s negative-pressure Regional Infectious Containment Unit to help handle the COVID-19 surge.

“We can't just reopen society, bam, on May 1. If we did that, our hospital would be overwhelmed again,” she said.

“When we were initially planning without social distancing, we were estimating that between 2,000 and 5,000 patients would need to be hospitalized at the University of Michigan. Instead, ... about two weeks after social distancing went into effect ... our curve stopped being exponential and started flattening. And I'm telling you, we breathed the collective sigh of relief.”

That’s when the university put on hold plans to open a field hospital at its indoor track to handle a rush of COVID-19 patients.

More: University of Michigan puts plan to open temporary hospital on hold

“We were talking about putting 500-1,000 beds in there, and it just was overwhelming,” Vaughn said. “I never want to have to see that building come to fruition. If we reopened the entire state on May 1, we would need that plus more to cover the number of people that need to be hospitalized.

“Luckily, I don't think our governor is going to let that happen, where the entire state opens up at once.

“But I do foresee some sort of phased reopening, and I think what is going to be necessary is widespread testing capacity. We've developed our own internal test here at the University of Michigan and increased our capacity to test both our patients and nursing homes.

“But we need more than that. We need to be able to do widespread testing of asymptomatic people. We need to … figure out how many people have antibodies — asymptomatic carriers of the disease who therefore are most likely to be immune.

“If we can get to that stage, we can really start to think about how to reopen in small ways to help the economy while not overwhelming our hospitals again. Because we are by no means out of the woods.”

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

My neighbor is now in the hospital with covid 19. His wife is at home with pneumonia, please if you are inclined to pray ,say a wee one for my friends

Valued Contributor
Posts: 712
Registered: ‎06-27-2016

@cherry wrote:

My neighbor is now in the hospital with covid 19. His wife is at home with pneumonia, please if you are inclined to pray ,say a wee one for my friends


@cherry  I am ss to hear that. I was just reading where you had posted that your neighbor was taken to the hospital and now I read this. So sad. I will pray for their quick recovery. I really hope the wife doesn't already have it too since she has pneumonia. 

~ Hope in TN ~
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

She was tested by the Dr and he said no, but living with a  covid 19 victim at such close range isn't too healthy

 

I have been worrying about them both for a while

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,943
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

@cherry wrote:

My neighbor is now in the hospital with covid 19. His wife is at home with pneumonia, please if you are inclined to pray ,say a wee one for my friends


__________________________________________________________

 

@cherry, I am so sorry to hear that.  Will certainly say prayers for all.  Please stay safe.  


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