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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,056
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage

I cannot imagine people not wanting to work.  I believe some moms may be staying home to possibly home school the kids?  Depending on where they live and if they do not agree with the school ciriculum. Still if you were working before the pandemic why not go back you still would still need the income wouldn't you? 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,343
Registered: ‎07-17-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage


@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

@On It 

 

I saw a thing online the other day, but can't remember whose column it was.  Basically, they said that we don't have so much a shortage of workers as we have a shortage of jobs where you can survive on what they pay. 

 

If there are jobs available, but pay what isn't a living wage, how will they hire anyone?  IMO, at first glance, the only option for many is to work TWO jobs at the same time, and that's not an attractive (or possible) option for many.  Good point, IMO.


While everyone has a different definition of a "living wage", it is ridiculous to expect every job to provide one.  People need to get the skills and experience needed for a job that pays a wage they expect/need.  Continually lowering the bar rather than raising expectations will be this countries downfall.


My mother is a boomer.  With only a high school education, she was able to get her foot in the door as an administrative assistant at the local park services and work her way up to a supervising accountant position. 

 

A few years ago, she told me she saw an ad for the exact position she had worked, at the exact same entity.  They wanted someone with a Master's degree and years of experience to do the same job she did as a high school graduate with no experience.

 

It doesn't sound like they lowered the bar at all; it sounds like they raised it so high that it's out of reach for most people.

 

 

 



"Heartburn Can Cause Cancer" -- www.ecan.org
Super Contributor
Posts: 298
Registered: ‎02-02-2018

Re: Continued Worker Shortage

@CrazyDaisy  I actually think a lot of companies could actually pay their employees more, but they choose not to in order to keep big payouts for the higher ups at companies.  The payouts that CEOs and top leadership receive at companies is UNREAL, while their employees can barely survive.

Super Contributor
Posts: 298
Registered: ‎02-02-2018

Re: Continued Worker Shortage

@RetRN Not surprised any of this is happening ... it's something that has happened as a result of what has been happening in our country for the last several years.  So many issues to fix and not a lot of people willing to work together.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,471
Registered: ‎04-04-2015

Re: Continued Worker Shortage

There is a contining theme that the cost of child care is way too high.  And yet, child care workers are part of the working poor that the same people complaining would say are underpaid.

 

So what is the answer here?

 

If you say the government should pay for it - that means additional taxes - which, hello, reduces pay even further.

 

If employers should pay - that reduces wages - or increases prices - or both.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,518
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage


@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@aroc3435 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy You state, correctly, that the U.S. prohibits hiring people that are in this country illegally.

 

I have to inform you, however, that there are many, many employers across this country--north, south, east, and west that do so and varied business categories.

 

And, usually, though it is risky, these employers get away with it.  

 

Undocumented employees are very afraid to complain or protest any unfair, illegal treatment.

 

Industries that routinely engage in this are employers in the hospitality and leisure industries, like restaurants, non or small chain motels, golf courses . . . 

 

aroc3435

Washington, DC


It is no longer as easy as you make it out to be.  


 

Non-partisan data says 7,500,000 undocumented immigrants are working in the United States, mostly in agriculture, construction, and the hospitality industry. In 2014, there were just 1,100,000.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,518
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage


@Duckncover wrote:

It has  been so hard to get meaningful data about how things are progressing as far as a recovery for our country from this pandemic. Just when it seems things are improving, there will be a headline that there were hundreds who died in the past month who were in their twenties or thirties...and even a middle aged teacher who died a week after getting her booster shot. What they didn't disclose until a month later was that each of these people had underlying health conditions, such as diabetes, kidney disease, heart conditions, etc. How can we possibly know our real status as a country if the data trickles out in a drip and isn't complete? Our state discontinued the unemployment as did many others....it saved millions that our state is now using for enforcement at our southern most border.  


 

Everyone will have a pre-existing condition if they live long enough. Most are treatable and people can live normal lives. And they'd still be alive but for covid. 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,283
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage


@JamandBread wrote:

Ugh. The "govenment" doesn't pay anyone to stay home.

Should we say the same about seniors who receive SS and Medicare? Is that also paying people to stay home?


Relly?? I worked many years and contibuted to the benifits I get now.  Don't compare us to the ones collecting that never put a dime into the sysem!!!

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,283
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Continued Worker Shortage


@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@gertrudecloset wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@gertrudecloset wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@aroc3435 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy   Providing a living wage doesn't lower the bar it gives an individual the means to provide for self with some dignity and decency and to climb the ladder instead of plunging into the abyss they can't hope to otherwise escape.

 

Pulling oneself by the bootstraps doesn't preclude offering a helping hand from one or more sources.  Encouragement and helping to preserve and enhance a worker's dignity enchances everbody else's quality of life.

 

aroc343

Washington, DC


Lower paying jobs are starter jobs not a person's life work.  Hard work, sacrifice and dedication to better oneself is "dignity and decency".  Whining that you want more money because you don't have enough and don't want to do anything else is absurd.  Provide more opportunities for people to better themselves, don't pay them to stay mediocre.  That is lowering the bar.


@CrazyDaisy 

 

These low paying jobs can and are be life long jobs for people who will not be able to do much better in life.  Think of the many disabled who work hard to hold down a job with integrity.  Their work skills will be limited.  No one said they should earn the wage of a physician if that's not what they are skilled at.  It's not as simple as you make it sound.

 

Think of the elderly who need to supplement their retirement with part time work because their retirement isn't cutting it due to inflation?

 

Of course, some of these jobs must remain around.  We need a fair balance in the work force.  Everyone can't be a Chief.  We need some worker bees too or else where will we be? Only in an ideal world (Utopia) would what you describe can be true.


The elderly and disabled recieve money from the Federal government from various programs, as they should.   These entry level jobs are there for people to get work experience and supplement other income, not raise a family of 4.  


@CrazyDaisy 

 

Yes, they do, but it's not enough.  Thus, the reason for needing work.  Have you ever heard of the "working poor?"


What is "enough"?  


Exactly!!  Perhaps people shouldn't be having families they can't afford and expect us to pay for them.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,071
Registered: ‎03-06-2020

Re: Continued Worker Shortage

[ Edited ]

@Isobel Archer  You bring up a good point regarding child care and costs.

 

When each of our children turned 2, they  entered pre-school. Now, this was a preschool with daycare option.The pre-school was located at our local Synagogue while the daycare was located at a different location (they are now housed under one huge roof on a gorgeous plot of land; ideal for young children).  To work at the pre-school as a teacher, a Masters in Education was required. To be an assistant teacher, a Bachelors. To work at the daycare in ANY capacity, you had to have a Bachelors. I will tell you that there was (and still is) a 3 year plus waiting list to get in; siblings of the original child enrolled are given preference.

 

The cost to attend was not cheap. It was worth every penny. That said, it would be in NO WAY considered affordable by any definition. And that is the problem: finding affordable SAFE care for the majority of families who are the working poor. Just because you both work 40 hours a week does NOT mean you have enough money after rent/utilities and bills are paid. Yet those who work in the majority of day care places make minimum wage....turn over is HIGH and vetting is rarely done (trust me, it isn't).  IMHO, the US should study the Nordic countries who are given an A+ for their childcare programs and copy them. But that would cost money so to the taxpayer so...yeah.

 

 

 

 

As for under the table wages: If you've ever gone to a Renaissance Fair, you've walked among a HUGE group of employees that are paid under the table. Many of the craftspeople make 6 figures; all under the table. You'd be surprised how many home additions/decor/paint jobs, etc are paid under the table. A side "hustle" is exactly that: a side job that pays under the table so you can avoid paying Uncle Sam. Happens all the time in all industries. Yep, yep, it does. 

"Coming to ya from Florida"