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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@Jinlei wrote:

@bathina wrote:

@piper54 wrote:

just google it dear, this has been on the mind of the administration for a long time, people will also have to work for food stamps. This is going to be very bad for needy people with few other options.


I believe for the most part, people aren't paying attention until something effects them. A lot of folks on disability should be panicked. They will essentially have to prove all over again that they are disabled. A scary thought for anybody on any kind of social program. 

What's even more galling is it's being done to try and close the deficit since the tax laws gave incredible advantages to the richest among us.



There are people that are on disability who shouldn't be.  Why should my tax dollars go to someone who is too lazy to work?

 

 


@Jinlei   I think you are confusing Social Security Disability(SSDI) and Security Income(SSI)  Those on Social Security disability,are NOT being paid by your tax dollars....

 

While many people don't distinguish between SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance), they are two completely different governmental programs. While both programs are overseen and managed by the Social Security Administration, and medical eligibility for disability is determined in the same manner for both programs, there are distinct differences between the two programs.

 

 

The main difference between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is the fact that SSDI is available to workers who have accumulated a sufficient number of work credits, while SSI disability benefits are available to low-income individuals who have either never worked or who haven't earned enough work credits to qualify for SSDI.

 

What Is SSI?

Supplemental Security Income is a program that is strictly need-based, according to income and assets, and is funded by general fund taxes (not from the Social Security trust fund). SSI is called a "means-tested program," meaning it has nothing to do with work history, but strictly with financial need. To meet the SSI income requirements, you must have less than $2,000 in assets (or $3,000 for a couple) and a very limited income.

Disabled people who are eligible under the income requirements for SSI are also able to receive Medicaid in the state they reside in. Most people who qualify for SSI will also qualify for food stamps, and the amount an eligible person will receive is dependent on where they live and the amount of regular, monthly income they have. SSI benefits will begin on the first of the month when you first submit your application.

SSI applicants are somewhat more likely to be female as fewer women are eligible for SSDI benefits (about 71% of women compared to 79% of men), generally because women have fewer qualifying years of work (over 60% of men have worked at least part of every year of their adult life, while only 41% of women can say the same).

Learn more about the SSI program and SSI benefits.

What Is SSDI?

Social Security Disability Insurance is funded through payroll taxes. SSDI recipients are considered "insured" because they have worked for a certain number of years and have made contributions to the Social Security trust fund in the form of FICA Social Security taxes. SSDI candidates must be younger than 65 and have earned a certain number of "work credits." (To learn more, see our article on SSDI and work credits.) After receiving SSDI for two years, a disabled person will become eligible for Medicare.

Under SSDI, a disabled person's spouse and children dependents are eligible to receive partial dependent benefits, called auxiliary benefits. However, only adults over the age of 18 can receive the SSDI disability benefit.

There is a five-month waiting period for benefits, meaning that the SSA won't pay you benefits for the first five months after you become disabled. The amount of the monthly benefit after the waiting period is over depends on your earnings record, much like the Social Security retirement benefit.

Approval rates for SSDI are higher on average than they are for SSI. There are a number of possible reasons for this. First, SSDI are more likely than SSI applicants to have a higher income and insurance coverage, which means they're more likely to have seen a doctor for their medical problems. (It's very difficult to win disability without seeing a doctor regularly.) Also, judges and claims examiners give more credibility to applicants who have a long work history, which most SSI applicants don't have.

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@SeaMaiden wrote:

@Jinlei wrote:

@bathina wrote:

@piper54 wrote:

just google it dear, this has been on the mind of the administration for a long time, people will also have to work for food stamps. This is going to be very bad for needy people with few other options.


I believe for the most part, people aren't paying attention until something effects them. A lot of folks on disability should be panicked. They will essentially have to prove all over again that they are disabled. A scary thought for anybody on any kind of social program. 

What's even more galling is it's being done to try and close the deficit since the tax laws gave incredible advantages to the richest among us.



There are people that are on disability who shouldn't be.  Why should my tax dollars go to someone who is too lazy to work?

 

 


@Jinlei   I think you are confusing Social Security Disability(SSDI) and Security Income(SSI)  Those on Social Security disability,are NOT being paid by your tax dollars....

 

While many people don't distinguish between SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance), they are two completely different governmental programs. While both programs are overseen and managed by the Social Security Administration, and medical eligibility for disability is determined in the same manner for both programs, there are distinct differences between the two programs.

 

 

The main difference between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is the fact that SSDI is available to workers who have accumulated a sufficient number of work credits, while SSI disability benefits are available to low-income individuals who have either never worked or who haven't earned enough work credits to qualify for SSDI.

 

What Is SSI?

Supplemental Security Income is a program that is strictly need-based, according to income and assets, and is funded by general fund taxes (not from the Social Security trust fund). SSI is called a "means-tested program," meaning it has nothing to do with work history, but strictly with financial need. To meet the SSI income requirements, you must have less than $2,000 in assets (or $3,000 for a couple) and a very limited income.

Disabled people who are eligible under the income requirements for SSI are also able to receive Medicaid in the state they reside in. Most people who qualify for SSI will also qualify for food stamps, and the amount an eligible person will receive is dependent on where they live and the amount of regular, monthly income they have. SSI benefits will begin on the first of the month when you first submit your application.

SSI applicants are somewhat more likely to be female as fewer women are eligible for SSDI benefits (about 71% of women compared to 79% of men), generally because women have fewer qualifying years of work (over 60% of men have worked at least part of every year of their adult life, while only 41% of women can say the same).

Learn more about the SSI program and SSI benefits.

What Is SSDI?

Social Security Disability Insurance is funded through payroll taxes. SSDI recipients are considered "insured" because they have worked for a certain number of years and have made contributions to the Social Security trust fund in the form of FICA Social Security taxes. SSDI candidates must be younger than 65 and have earned a certain number of "work credits." (To learn more, see our article on SSDI and work credits.) After receiving SSDI for two years, a disabled person will become eligible for Medicare.

Under SSDI, a disabled person's spouse and children dependents are eligible to receive partial dependent benefits, called auxiliary benefits. However, only adults over the age of 18 can receive the SSDI disability benefit.

There is a five-month waiting period for benefits, meaning that the SSA won't pay you benefits for the first five months after you become disabled. The amount of the monthly benefit after the waiting period is over depends on your earnings record, much like the Social Security retirement benefit.

Approval rates for SSDI are higher on average than they are for SSI. There are a number of possible reasons for this. First, SSDI are more likely than SSI applicants to have a higher income and insurance coverage, which means they're more likely to have seen a doctor for their medical problems. (It's very difficult to win disability without seeing a doctor regularly.) Also, judges and claims examiners give more credibility to applicants who have a long work history, which most SSI applicants don't have.


 

Thank,you for,the information.  I learned something new today.😊

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@esme wrote:

@shoekitty wrote:

@esme wrote:

Add food stamps, subsidized housing, food banks,  “soup kitchens,”Medicaid. They get what they need.  

 

The amount they get may be based on their work history, but not the money they Govternmget. And those who have never worked…I don’t know how their amount is determined.

 

 It’s tax money. 


Shoekitty said

Most of what you said is untrue. Most people on disability do not qualify for medicaid, you do not get foodstamps with most disability and i laugh about the housing.  Not in california.  Subsadized housing housing is a rarity here. There is a waiting list of thousands and you usually have to have children, long story.If you are in a facilit you benone of those things if you are on disability. Soup kitchens are not in every town, in our town they serve dinner twice a week.  


@shoekitty  I thought food stamps were based on income...disabled, retired or working. 

 

Ditto for medicaid (before eligibility for Medicare). 

 

Not true?


Shoekitty said

i am in california,income limits are different than other states.  foodstamps are given by some income, and situation.  Sometimes they are only given to kids., or those living alone.past working age.   I worked with the very poor.  In california that is no money to about 29,ooo.  Food stamps arent much, and usually given to families with children.  Sometimes only to the kids.  Most food stamps are seasonal, and for a couple months or on emergency basis. If your children get free lunch and breakfast they count those as meals.  Some only need that, they buy their dinners.  Most people I have met have families who can help during a crisis with an occasional bag of groceries donated by a church or SA.  The others have no one.  There family situation is dire, no family, relatives....or they have been kicked out of family graces for one reason or another, 

 

most families I have worked with are so ashamed, and resistant to accept help until it is a matter that school or SS steps in.   You cant imagine the families I have served in trailers, rv's, living in parks...moving around.  An illness, job loss,  eviction, it is heart breaking. Most do odd jobs, and do not collect checks as they have no address, and are lost in the system.  

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

@nutmeg3 It's Stressful for me that two people who live on my street are collecting disability while working for their family and being paid "under the table." Benefits both payee and payor.  These people make it difficult for those who are truly disabled such as my friend. 

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

[ Edited ]

I just asked my friend who is a social worker.  You can look this up but off the top her head here are the staes that lead food stamp usage

 

Illinois

oregon

kentucky

DOC

Florida

Mississippi

georgia

 

caucasions use food stamps the most

 

my personal opinion for those who  use food stamps alone as their only social service...it benefits us.  Those who use their stamps responsibly, pay rent, utilities, medical in place of the small food allowence they get   It helps them so much.  A couple hundred dollars a month in food is life and death to them.  There are a few who abuse the system,  i have know kids steal the food card when parents are not looking so they know they food atend of month

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@Tobes wrote:

@nutmeg3 It's Stressful for me that two people who live on my street are collecting disability while working for their family and being paid "under the table." Benefits both payee and payor.  These people make it difficult for those who are truly disabled such as my friend. 



@Tobes This is a shame. I see two problems, one with the IRS and another with SSA. 

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

[ Edited ]

@shoekitty    Not surprising re: caucasians and food stamps as that is by far the largest percentage of the US population. 

 

eta...From the same post above, what does this mean:

 

Those who use their stamps responsibly, pay rent, utilities, medical in place of the small food allowence they get 

 

 

*********************
Keepin' it real.
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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

@esme 

 

Sorry esme.  I didnt have my glasses on and my fingers were working good.  I meant those that receive food stamps and use them responsibally, use the money they would have spent on food on their rent, or utilities  or medications.  It is a lifesaver for them.  You are right about the demographics.  

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

We are watching this closely on behalf of our son. What I'm finding is it depends on the disability and the "verdict": will you be able to work in the future? That's a loaded question for many.

 

My son qualifies for food stamps but doesn't apply for it. 

 

We were notified that his montly check will increase by $12 and odd cents starting 1/1/20. That doesn't even cover a co-pay on one of his many drugs.

 

 

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@Southern Bee wrote:

@I am still oxox : I am handicapped but worked for over 23 years in a very stressful job but had to retire on disability. I had to fill out review papers every two years but had the medical documents to support my case. I will be 66 in July and have been told the disability social security with change over to regular social security but don't know if the amount will decrease. Sad that some people assume if you get disability- you have never worked, lied and cheated to get the benefits. Plus some disabilities are severe but no physical evidence to show what a person struggles with on a daily basis.Southern Bee


Shoekitty said

 

i hear you loud and clear. If you worked your full 40 credits, and it sounds like you did. You probably will see a nice increase. Depends on your credits. I think the max for social security is 3000.   But once you get SS and go on medicare they will deduct out of SS for medicare. Hooefully you will see an increase