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Registered: ‎06-10-2015

Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@shoekitty wrote:

@Southern Bee wrote:

@I am still oxox : I am handicapped but worked for over 23 years in a very stressful job but had to retire on disability. I had to fill out review papers every two years but had the medical documents to support my case. I will be 66 in July and have been told the disability social security with change over to regular social security but don't know if the amount will decrease. Sad that some people assume if you get disability- you have never worked, lied and cheated to get the benefits. Plus some disabilities are severe but no physical evidence to show what a person struggles with on a daily basis.Southern Bee


Shoekitty said

 

i hear you loud and clear. If you worked your full 40 credits, and it sounds like you did. You probably will see a nice increase. Depends on your credits. I think the max for social security is 3000.   But once you get SS and go on medicare they will deduct out of SS for medicare. Hooefully you will see an increase


@shoekitty , I believe that Southern Bee is already on SSDI, meaning the retirement equivalent, not the welfare SSI. So when she attains full retirement age of 66 or 66 plus, her SSDI will convert to retirement status, but the amount will remain the same. She will not get "a nice increase" or any increase until the following year, and that's a COLA increase, and only if the government approves one for that year. Everyone else on Social Security, retirement or SSDI, will also get it. She's probably already getting Medicare and having that deducted from her monthly check or deposit.

 

Nothing will change but that payout status. And of course, there won't be the need to see doctors to prove continuing disability, and the earning restraints or penalties under disability are eased.

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

SSI recipients and those who care for them should know about ABLE acccounts, a nationwide savings program enacted in most states. If, by his or her 26th birthday, the person on SSI had the medical condition that qualified him or her for disability, that person may be qualified for an ABLE account. (The rules are often misread, so people think they had to be on disability by their 26th birthday. Not so, but they need to have had the disabling condition, and may have to have had a formal diagnosis of same.)

 

ABLE accounts can hold, I believe, up to $100K, with a limit of $15K in deposits per year, at least in the state I looked into on behalf of someone else. This is SS-approved, but as with Supplemental Needs Trusts, I believe the recipient has to take care to spend on non-SSI-covered or assisted expenses.

 

An ABLE account provides much more autonomy to the person, if he or she is able to manage funds, and/or the person helping him or her. It's a terrific way for someone on SSI to receive a small inheritance. It's much less cumbersome and has far lower maintenance costs than a Supplemental (Special) Needs Trust.

 

Please look into this relatively new device that helps those on SSI avoid the enforced penury of the $2K liquid asset limit if it would help you or someone you're assisting.

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@noodleann wrote:

SSI recipients and those who care for them should know about ABLE acccounts, a nationwide savings program enacted in most states. If, by his or her 26th birthday, the person on SSI had the medical condition that qualified him or her for disability, that person may be qualified for an ABLE account. (The rules are often misread, so people think they had to be on disability by their 26th birthday. Not so, but they need to have had the disabling condition, and may have to have had a formal diagnosis of same.)

 

ABLE accounts can hold, I believe, up to $100K, with a limit of $15K in deposits per year, at least in the state I looked into on behalf of someone else. This is SS-approved, but as with Supplemental Needs Trusts, I believe the recipient has to take care to spend on non-SSI-covered or assisted expenses.

 

An ABLE account provides much more autonomy to the person, if he or she is able to manage funds, and/or the person helping him or her. It's a terrific way for someone on SSI to receive a small inheritance. It's much less cumbersome and has far lower maintenance costs than a Supplemental (Special) Needs Trust.

 

Please look into this relatively new device that helps those on SSI avoid the enforced penury of the $2K liquid asset limit if it would help you or someone you're assisting.


Thank you for posting this important information.

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020


@Southern Bee wrote:

@Panda123 : People just don't understand depression unless they have felt it. My DH is retired military with ptsd and depression and people tell him - you need to shake it off and move on- just not that simple. Depression and living with so many physical issues can't be overcome with out medical and other help. People take for granted being healthy and no mental or physical disability, plus you include the issues that come with getting older. Southern Bee


You are right @Southern Bee . I can not tell you how many people have said she should get a little job. Some days she will just cry all day and others she can not get out of bed. She is not dependable, who would hire her? 

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Re: Changes to Social Security Disability 2020

@Panda123 : Totally agree and understand. Southern Bee