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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,905
Registered: ‎06-23-2014

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding


@oceanjade wrote:

That happened at our wedding. Three people RSVP'd that they were coming and then 'no shows' with feeble excuses but I never thought of sending them a bill though I would have liked to. Our 'per person' meal was much higher than theirs unfortunately. But it was very rude.


We were lucky that only a couple didn't show up at my daughter's wedding and there were a few who said they could only attend the wedding, not the reception, who of course then wanted to stay for the reception. So it worked out well. I agree @oceanjade, my daughter's was much higher also. I don't know that people are in touch with the costs of meals and open bar these days. It certainly was pretty shocking to me. I've always been able to attend after RSVP but I'll make sure going forward that unless I'm deadly ill or someone dies, I'll go. It's unfortunate to stick them with paying for something no one consumed. But a bill??  Please. If you can't eat the cost, you are overspending..that's the price of doing business. I'm also glad I've spent "more" on a gift than I felt appropriate since now I know what they cost!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,238
Registered: ‎07-29-2014

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding


@beach-mom wrote:

You've got to be kidding me! What a way to ruin a friendship - bill your friends for not attending your wedding. I understand the bride and groom and/or their families pay a lot for the reception, but MOST would have the common sense to realize there could be a few who don't make it. 

 

I get migraines. If that happened the day of a wedding, could I stand up without being nauseous? NO - I would have to miss the wedding. 

 

What if someone was coming  and got caught in a traffic delay due to an accident? Three hour backups are real! 

 

There are all kinds of reasons people don't intend to miss weddings but have to. If they have RSVP'd "yes," then they do intend to be there. 

 

THIS is just SILLY! (insert emoticon shaking his head!) 


 

Here:

 

fat-white-cat-shaking-no-smiley-emoticon.gif (120×182)

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,238
Registered: ‎07-29-2014

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding

[ Edited ]

To the human race, I again say...

 

GET

 

OVER

 

YOURSELVES

 

!!!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,475
Registered: ‎03-14-2015

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding

Let me start off by saying that it was 100% rude and tacky to send the no shows a bill.

 

 

My question is, when the couple RSVPed, was that a contract?

 

 

If so, then the no-shows breached that contract, and the wedding couple could sue to recoup what they were out.

 

Now please do not misunderstanding me, I am NOT defending them. As I said, I think sending a bill to the no-shows, is beyond tacky and rude. I would not do it myself.

 

I was just wondering legally, if when one sends back an RSVP saying that they will attend, that that becomes a legally binding contract.

 

A contract does not have to be drawn up by lawyers. A contract can be written on toilet paper with crayon, as Judge Marylin Millan on "The People's Court" likes to say.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,126
Registered: ‎06-20-2010

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding

An RSVP to a wedding is not a contract.

 

At best, it might be considered a "gentleman's agreement," but there is nothing legally binding by showing up or not showing up to a wedding. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 65,768
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding

The folks with the audacity to mail the bill would now be former friends...

 

And, had I sent a wedding present, I'd suggest they return it and apply the refund to my tab...


In my pantry with my cupcakes...
Honored Contributor
Posts: 65,768
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding


@abbeythe 8th wrote:

@granddi wrote:

I'll describe rude. Our daughter's wedding reception was at a lovely historical hotel. A couple rsvp-ed to the reception and then had dinner in the hotel restaurant. The appeared for the open bar and dance. 


Maybe they didn't like or couldn't eat what you were serving.  Would it have been better for them to sit there and not eat, making everyone else feel awkward?

 

Did they give your daughter a gift?


 

Yea, I guess I don't find this one all that rude.  They said they'd come and they did. They just opted to eat elsewhere, which they undoubtedly paid for.


In my pantry with my cupcakes...
Honored Contributor
Posts: 65,768
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding

[ Edited ]

The bottom line... people make WAY too much over weddings in the first place...


In my pantry with my cupcakes...
Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,321
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding


@queendiva wrote:

So, who alerted the media to this? Did the no-show post the "bill" on fb?

Methinks there's a whole other side to this story that's she's not telling, because it would not reflect well on her...


@queendiva - I agree with what you've said.  I only saw this on the news tonight, but the couple said that they were upset that so many people, who had RSVP'd, didn't show up and they still had to cover the costs.  At nearly $76 a couple, I'm not surprised that they were upset.

 

Nevermind the fact that it appears the "no shows" didn't bother to let them know.  (Come on, not all of them could've had a last-minute emergency.)

 

And, yes, how much class does it show for the woman of the "no show" couple to release this online and to the media?  As you said, there's a whole other side.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,475
Registered: ‎03-14-2015

Re: Billed for being a no show at wedding


@brii wrote:

An RSVP to a wedding is not a contract.

 

At best, it might be considered a "gentleman's agreement," but there is nothing legally binding by showing up or not showing up to a wedding. 


 

 

 

I am just playing the devil's advocate. But, if tbey RSVPed, saying that they would be there, then the couple had an expectation that they would show up, and spent more money, based on that expectation.

 

In other words, if the couple knew that they weren't going to show, they wouldn't have spent that money.

 

Again, I am just playing the devil's advocate.