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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,455
Registered: ‎08-31-2019

We have some cities in TX getting hit hard.  I'm sure most have heard of El Paso's ICU's reaching capacity.  Some of those patients are being transferred out of El Paso. We have accepted ten, so far, in San Antonio.  Others are going elsewhere.  

 

Docs are already saying that if this spreads and continues, they will be back at the point of having to decide who gets care and who doesn't, based on predicted survivability assessment.  That doesn't bode well for seniors, the frail, those with preexisting high risk health issues, etc.  More reason for those with high risk to be hyper-vigilant with precautions.

 

So, yes, we're in trouble, with the worst numbers since March in several hot spots across the US.  The only good thing is, that treatment measures have improved, saving many lives that likely wouldn't have made it, earlier on.  But, still...

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Posts: 12,941
Registered: ‎06-17-2015

@BlueFinch wrote:

We have some cities in TX getting hit hard.  I'm sure most have heard of El Paso's ICU's reaching capacity.  Some of those patients are being transferred out of El Paso. We have accepted ten, so far, in San Antonio.  Others are going elsewhere.  

 

Docs are already saying that if this spreads and continues, they will be back at the point of having to decide who gets care and who doesn't, based on predicted survivability assessment.  That doesn't bode well for seniors, the frail, those with preexisting high risk health issues, etc.  More reason for those with high risk to be hyper-vigilant with precautions.

 

So, yes, we're in trouble, with the worst numbers since March in several hot spots across the US.  The only good thing is, that treatment measures have improved, saving many lives that likely wouldn't have made it, earlier on.  But, still...


@BlueFinch   El Paso is also under a curfew order from 10pm until 5am.

""Out beyond the ideas of right-doing and wrong-doing, there is a field. I will meet you there." -Rumi
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Posts: 1,199
Registered: ‎06-02-2014

I generally stock up anyway, so we are set.  I also try to

keep some non-perishables and paper goods for our son

and his family who live in the City. 

 

We are prepared and have a lot of masks, soaps, sanitizers,

wipes. 

We've seen our doctors for routine appts., and our dogs keep

us very happy as companions. 

It is hard not being able to visit family members who live out

of state or to travel, which we usually do three times a year.

 

Overall, I am trying to stay hopeful and grateful.

 

But, as many have already stated, we are waiting for a safe and

effective vaccine.  So we are prepared for a wait of a few more months.

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Posts: 21,491
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@suzyQ3 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

These predictions are being made by which experts???

 

 


It's already here, @CrazyDaisy. Isn't everyone aware that the virus is surging in a large swath of the country?

 

We've seen the the highest daily counts since the pandemic began.


Glad to see your crystal ball is all changed up and you know what is going to be happening months from now.


I didn't say what will happen for the rest of the year. Yes, there could be a miracle and the virus will decline or disappear.

 

What I do know is what is happening now, in late October: In 37 states, the numbers of new cases are higher and staying high; in five states, the numbers are lower but going up; and in eight states, the numbers are lower and staying lower (this includes the U.S Virgin Islands)

 

In the last 14 days, cases have risen by 40 percent; deaths, by 14 percent.

 

source: The NYT's daily Covid stats, which can be found on other sites as well. The source also has many more stats and maps.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,675
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@santorini :  Once when we visited Lancaster PA, we asked a local for a recommendation for a good Amish restaurant (pre GPS) and he said "Good and Plenty", " half way between Intercourse and Paradise". We went around seemingly in circles for over half an hour and when we finally found it we could see the lights of the Rockdale Mall in the distance. Love that area!

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Registered: ‎09-30-2010

@chessylady   Yes I am prepared, just in case.  The only thing I can't keep a supply of is meat, since I just have a normal top of the fridge freezer.  And most fresh produce can't be stockpiled.

 

I have all the ingredients for everyday and holiday meals and baking stocked now:  spices, seasonings, condiments, yeast, sugar, all purpose and bread flour, rice, dry milk, buttermilk, cream, wheat germ, variety of beans, tinned clams, crabmeat, tuna, condensed soup, rice, egg noodles and other pasta.

 

Hoping it doesn't come to having to shelter in place again, but I prefer to be proactive rather than struggle to play catchup.

 

Having lived in New England I always try to have emergency supplies to last a couple of weeks.  Hurricanes and blizzards taught me well, but the pandemic caught me somewhat flatfooted.  I was, and am, well stocked with vitamins and such, and aspirin.  I am fortunate that neither Significant Other or I take any prescription meds.

 

I'm well stocked on napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper too.

 

I never want to have to panic pursue the purchase of toilet paper again.

 

Best, and hopefully what we keep in supply will not be necessary during another shelter in place.  If not necessary we can just use up the stockpile and replace as needed during more stable, normal times.

 

aroc3435

Washington, DC

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,491
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Susan in California wrote:

I generally stock up anyway, so we are set.  I also try to

keep some non-perishables and paper goods for our son

and his family who live in the City. 

 

We are prepared and have a lot of masks, soaps, sanitizers,

wipes. 

We've seen our doctors for routine appts., and our dogs keep

us very happy as companions. 

It is hard not being able to visit family members who live out

of state or to travel, which we usually do three times a year.

 

Overall, I am trying to stay hopeful and grateful.

 

But, as many have already stated, we are waiting for a safe and

effective vaccine.  So we are prepared for a wait of a few more months.


@Susan in California, I wish I could be more confident that such a wait will be beneficial. I'm afraid that for many reasons, it will not rescue us. Between the fact that it will likely not be anywhere never 100 percent effective (probably more the flu shot at about 60 percent) and the fact that so many will not take it for various reasons, I just don't see it as a savior.

 

I hope that I am wrong, because I would certainly be happy if it were to get us to herd immunity. It is the only humane way to get there. Anything else would be catastrophic and should not even be contemplated.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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Posts: 12,941
Registered: ‎06-17-2015

  Winter squashes also store well for 3-4 months.

 

Best not to let them touch, though.  Keep in a cool dry place preferably wrap in paper and place in a box without the lid.

 

Check periodically in case you find dark spot.

 

Although hardy, it would only take one squash to start deteriorating.

""Out beyond the ideas of right-doing and wrong-doing, there is a field. I will meet you there." -Rumi
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,675
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Bad Covid Winter

[ Edited ]

@aroc3435 wrote:

@chessylady   Yes I am prepared, just in case.  The only thing I can't keep a supply of is meat, since I just have a normal top of the fridge freezer.  And most fresh produce can't be stockpiled.

 

I have all the ingredients for everyday and holiday meals and baking stocked now:  spices, seasonings, condiments, yeast, sugar, all purpose and bread flour, rice, dry milk, buttermilk, cream, wheat germ, variety of beans, tinned clams, crabmeat, tuna, condensed soup, rice, egg noodles and other pasta.

 

Hoping it doesn't come to having to shelter in place again, but I prefer to be proactive rather than struggle to play catchup.

 

Having lived in New England I always try to have emergency supplies to last a couple of weeks.  Hurricanes and blizzards taught me well, but the pandemic caught me somewhat flatfooted.  I was, and am, well stocked with vitamins and such, and aspirin.  I am fortunate that neither Significant Other or I take any prescription meds.

 

I'm well stocked on napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper too.

 

I never want to have to panic pursue the purchase of toilet paper again.

 

Best, and hopefully what we keep in supply will not be necessary during another shelter in place.  If not necessary we can just use up the stockpile and replace as needed during more stable, normal times.

 

aroc3435

Washington, DC



The third wave is already here in many states.  Example: Salt Lake City is so near ICU capacity that they are developing priority for Covid care (two equally sick people, one old, one young, treat the young patient and let the old patient die). DH was talking to our older son who is a chef in N.M.; our son said if he leaves state he has to quarantine for 12 days when he returns.  Made me wonder if we'll see Grands (who live in CA) for Christmas if it gets worse.  Will we (live in AZ) be able to drive into CA without them or us needing to quarantine?  Today they announced that more than 8 million people have gotten Covid and 225,000 have died.  So yes, its Covid, Covid, Covid!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,675
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Forgot to mention that we are well stocked in all areas, including rice, beans and canned meats and we are now concentrating on stockpiling cash, especially small bills.  This last isn't due to pandemic, its the possible Civil situation.