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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen


@Mj12 wrote:
Anyone remember the Rory Kennedy documentary years ago, I think it was called American Hollow. Really worth watching.

 

 I think that is the one I watched.

Super Contributor
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Registered: ‎06-19-2011

Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

Part of the issue in helping these people is that, quite frankly, they don't want the help.  They come from families that want to be insulated and want to protect their culture.  They are wary of outsiders and can become outright hostile to what they perceive as intrusion into their business.  I'm speaking of some of the poorest folks living in the "hollers". 

 

According to things I've read and seen over even the past 10 years or so indicate that doctors, nurses, drug counselors, welfare workers, etc. are still often turned away when help is offered.

 

Honored Contributor
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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

Nunya, I vaguely remember Mt Dew being advertised with a "hillbilly" character...back when that was okay.
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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen


@tansy wrote:
Nunya, I vaguely remember Mt Dew being advertised with a "hillbilly" character...back when that was okay.

 Yes, they had Willie the Hillbilly on recent throwback packages of Dew

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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

[ Edited ]
MrsSweetieBear -- The author is Julia Keller. Her character is Bell Elkins, a prosecuting attorney, working in Raythune County, WVA. It's not my favorite series but the author writes well. I've read the first two books.
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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen


@NUNYA wrote:

@Mj12 wrote:
Anyone remember the Rory Kennedy documentary years ago, I think it was called American Hollow. Really worth watching.

 

 I think that is the one I watched.


*****

I watched it too and cried.  These are some very proud people and I loathe it when I hear people make fun of people in the mountains.  I have family that lives in a holler in east Tennessee, but they've progressed and the area has grown but drugs are a part of many lives, so sad.  I had a second cousin that was involved deeply and I won't say anymore. 

Go VOLS
Rocky Top you'll always be home sweet home to me.. Good ole Rocky Top, Rocky Top Tennessee... Rocky Top Tennessee
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Posts: 6,655
Registered: ‎06-29-2010

Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen


@AnotherView2 wrote:

Part of the issue in helping these people is that, quite frankly, they don't want the help.  They come from families that want to be insulated and want to protect their culture.  They are wary of outsiders and can become outright hostile to what they perceive as intrusion into their business.  I'm speaking of some of the poorest folks living in the "hollers". 

 

According to things I've read and seen over even the past 10 years or so indicate that doctors, nurses, drug counselors, welfare workers, etc. are still often turned away when help is offered.

 


I've read the various articles and heard the interviews of how the people there refuse the help and education.  You cannot force them to live a certain way even if it means the death of them.  Sad.

Never Forget the Native American Indian Holocaust
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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

Love Roses -- We can educate the kids, make sure they have a decent meal, check their eyes and teeth, provide vaccinations and just show the kids that there are other possibilibities for their lives.
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Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

We can educate the kids, make sure they have a decent meal, check their eyes and teeth, provide vaccinations and just show the kids that there are other possibilibities for their lives.

 

***************************

 

I agree with you, tansy.  The younger generation is always the hope for the future.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
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Posts: 6,655
Registered: ‎06-29-2010

Re: Appalachia: Poverty Is A Carcinogen

Tansy/Noel - I agree with your takes but what you think will work has been tried and tried and done and done.  The people there just refuse to do anything for themselves to prevent so much pain and suffering.  It cannot be forced.  The children ARE given info and classes and education but it doesn't seem to take hold.  You can't force things on them.  It's going to be them that are willing to rise above their living ways. 

Never Forget the Native American Indian Holocaust