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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎05-21-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

@Oznell    I live in the south and I have not heard that pronunciation. Maybe it is a regional thing, adult being pronounced as adoolt and multi as moolti. Nope not heard that at all. And they say we southerners have strange ways of saying words. 

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Registered: ‎05-21-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

My mother taught school with a lady whose name was Jordan and she pronounced it Jerdon. I think this is a southern thing. There is also a county in Georgia, Talliaferro. Those who live there pronounce it Talliver. And you better not pronounce it like it is spelled or they will quickly set you straight.   We also have a street in Savannah, Houston St. spelled like the city in Texas. We pronounce this HOUSETON. And Whitemarsh Island is pronounced Whitmarsh. Go figure

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

[ Edited ]

@geezerette 


@geezerette wrote:

I've mostly noticed the younger ones (younger to me, anyway) with the soft or absent 't's.  Like "buh-er" or "ki-en" for "butter" and "kitten".


 

Yes, I've noticed that, especially with "button"....they pronounce it "buuon". Kinda grating on the ears....

 

 

 

 

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals" -Immanuel Kant

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,921
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

I have noticed the missing t thing (buh unn) but I've always said and heard "drah-ma."  


What I do wish is for someone to inform Suzanne Runyan that the word is "across" and not "acrossed."  "Curtis Stone has the highest sales acrossed all the lines at HSN."

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

Not hearing the oo instead of the uh locally...


In my pantry with my cupcakes...
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Registered: ‎03-02-2016

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

Can’t say I have heard what you describe. That is a new one for me.
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Registered: ‎12-27-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

@Oznell nope, ive never heard the changes you are referring to.

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Registered: ‎07-11-2010

Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

The only time I have heard the "oo" sound is when my DD lived in Toronto for 5 years and started picking up the accent and one day she said the word "about" to me but it came out sounding like "a boot" and I asked her "what boot?"  We both laughed so hard we couldn't speak for a few minutes. 

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Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS

A couple of comments on your very interesting responses.  I shouldn't love this stuff so much, but I do -

 

It's not surprising that no one here has personal experience of hearing the short "a",   rhymes-with-"hama"  pronunciation of what is now "drawma / drahma".    I said I think the short "a" version dwindled and gradually disappeared, around the Forties, sometime.  Could be the Thirties, depending on the place.  Therefore, very few people living today would have any strong memory of that pronunciation.   It's just fascinating how these things evolve...

 

@781Florist ,  you probably have a very good "ear" for this sort of thing-- plus, there's another factor.  I did say that "adoolt" probably wasn't a regional, but more generational thing.  However,  your geographical location, in a large Eastern Seaboard city if I recall, with an unusually huge campus population, puts you in a position to hear it more than probably the rest of us.   Where I've heard it the most, funnily enough, is among relatively young speakers on C-Span,  on the endless various panels and discussions they have.   Locally,  I've only heard a few examples--  even though my ear is fairly 'attuned'....

 

Ha, ha, "upspeak" is something my husband would join you in not caring for.   I think some linguists have made the fascinating point that those who continually end their sentences "up",  as if asking a question,  risk being seen as not authoritative in their jobs--- and consequently, they advise against doing it habitually.

 

@JudyL ,  that's funny!   As one who grew up hearing and speaking in a Canadian accent, I can even give you a slight variation on "aboot".   It's "abote",  not much different, and not as well known,  but definitely one of the changes that Canadians can wring on "about".        

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Re: ANOTHER CHANGE IN THE WAY SOME PEOPLE PRONOUNCE THIS


@geezerette wrote:

I've mostly noticed the younger ones (younger to me, anyway) with the soft or absent 't's.  Like "buh-er" or "ki-en" for "butter" and "kitten".


 

hearing people use the absent t's drives me up the wall. 


Why is it, when I have a 50/50 guess at something, I'm always 100% wrong?