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Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,415
Registered: ‎11-25-2011

👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve

Love Juliette!

She pushed the 'Flatten the Curve' a couple days ago.

Really makes a difference when one sees Crisis Management

written out.  Makes sense. 

 

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,611
Registered: ‎05-13-2010

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve

I am big on flattening the curve.  If each of us avoids using an ICU bed, then there will be beds for those who could not avoid it.

 

I don't want to be like Italy where they give up on patients over age 65.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,270
Registered: ‎05-19-2012

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve

[ Edited ]

In his column yesterday, David von Drehle wrote:

 

"According to the World Health Organization, Italy had three confirmed covid-19 cases three weeks ago. Yes, three — as in the number of contestants on 'Jeopardy!' Now the entire nation of some 60 million people is essentially quarantined, at an untold cost to the economy of a highly developed nation.

 

That kind of decision is not made in response to overheated media.

 

As Pan’s remark suggests, a disease does not have to be the worst ever seen to produce a scenario that is the worst ever seen. It only needs to pose additional burdens on health-care resources beyond the capacity of those resources. Suppose a city’s hospitals have a total of 10 ventilators and suppose seven of them are in use, keeping victims of familiar flu and pneumonia alive. The eruption of a new disease that causes a mere four people to need a ventilator poses a crisis for that city. And the crisis becomes unsustainable if similar outbreaks are happening in surrounding cities as well."

 

This column really clarified so much for me and increased my understanding of containment and flattening the curve -- as quickly as possible. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,701
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve

"Boom, boom, out go the lights."

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,152
Registered: ‎02-05-2018

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve


@KarenQVC wrote:

I am big on flattening the curve.  If each of us avoids using an ICU bed, then there will be beds for those who could not avoid it.

 

I don't want to be like Italy where they give up on patients over age 65.


Absolutely!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,749
Registered: ‎02-02-2015

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve


@KarenQVC wrote:

I am big on flattening the curve.  If each of us avoids using an ICU bed, then there will be beds for those who could not avoid it.

 

I don't want to be like Italy where they give up on patients over age 65.


That is heartbreaking.  They have to prioritize, not enough staff, not enough ventilators, etc.  Very bad situation.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,152
Registered: ‎02-05-2018

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve


@Snoopp wrote:

@KarenQVC wrote:

I am big on flattening the curve.  If each of us avoids using an ICU bed, then there will be beds for those who could not avoid it.

 

I don't want to be like Italy where they give up on patients over age 65.


That is heartbreaking.  They have to prioritize, not enough staff, not enough ventilators, etc.  Very bad situation.


It is, and it terrifies me. I'm worried about myself because I'm already in the middle of an asthma flare because of allergies, but I'm far more worried for my parents. They're both in their 80s. They both have asthma and my mother is in poor health already.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,749
Registered: ‎02-02-2015

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve

@Alison Wonderlandparents are a worry.  If they can stay in till this settles down it would be a good thing for them.  I am doing all the grocery shopping for my mother so she stays in.  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,152
Registered: ‎02-05-2018

Re: 👍5 Stages of Crisis Mgmt & Flatten the Curve


@Snoopp wrote:

@Alison Wonderlandparents are a worry.  If they can stay in till this settles down it would be a good thing for them.  I am doing all the grocery shopping for my mother so she stays in.  


So true, @Snoop. They live in California and I'm in Texas. My sister lives with them, but if she gets exposed at the grocery store she'll eventually give it to them.

 

My dad is - and has always been - one of those "everything will be fine" guys who has a super high IQ, but doesn't do well with basic life stuff. He's already in deep denial about my mom's dementia and doesn't take that anywhere near as seriously as he should be and I know it's going to be the same with this.

 

I'm hoping the community around him, like the church he goes to every week, will force his hand by canceling things. His older brother died of polio when my dad was a kid, so I'm hoping he'll make an emotional connection with the seriousness, but I feel like a lifetime of vaccines and effective treatments for preventing and treating HIV have made it too easy to forget how serious infectious diseases can be. The closest I remember in my own lifetime was the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 90s, but I don't think many of us surburban straight people truly grasped how devastating that was.