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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,502
Registered: ‎10-30-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .


@LoriLori wrote:

@icezeus wrote:

I promised myself this year that I would try to read a handful of books that are not my usual genre. I currently have 10 books home from the library (thank goodness for renewals) and only one of them would I consider out of my normal comfort/enjoyable zone. It's called Three Wishes by Liane Moriarty. We shall see.


 

I love that book!  Not Liane Moriarty's best ("The Husband's Secret" is usually cited as her best) but her first, I wandered into it before she hit the bigtime and I adore that book so good, bad or indifferent, love to know what you think of it @icezeus.


@LoriLori

I finished up my James Patterson book last night and started Three Wishes this morning. I am really enjoying it so far. Very lighthearted, and a fun easy read. Not my normal thriller, murder. etc...etc.. type of book. 

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,001
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

Good advice. I need to read some non-fiction and some classics for a change. Maybe a book about Bush one (who recently passed), and something by Hawthorne would be a start.

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Posts: 28,115
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

[ Edited ]

@Jancade wrote:

Our local library is currently running their annual adult winter reading program. This year, it is set up as a bingo card, with each space on the card as a different genre. Read a book for each square, you are eligible for weekly prizes. Bingos make you eligible for the grand prize. This forces me to read genres that I usually stay away from. Just finished 2 books this past week that I loved and thought that I would share on here. The first is Kimberly Belle’s suspense/ thriller called “Three Days Missing” and the second which is the one that was out of my comfort zone (young adult) was “Far From the Tree” by Robin Benway. Loved them both. Check out plot synopsis on Goodreads or other sites, but remember to break out of your shell every so often. You may end up loving what you find.


 

 

@Jancade 

 

It's rather late here when I'm reading this, so maybe I'm  missing the point, but why would you be uncomfortable (or stay away from) reading a young adult book?

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,571
Registered: ‎05-30-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

I don't think any books are really outside my comfort zone.  But there are some grenres I just don't find interesting and I'm not going to read them.  If that means they're out of my comfort zone, then so be it.  

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Posts: 3,035
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

I just finished The Outsider by Stephen King about an hour ago.   I now remember why I stopped reading his books decades ago.  I didn't know anything about it and it started out great.  Then, it went 'out there'.  

 

I don't know if it's out of my comfort zone; it was just not a genre I normally read.  I just didn't like it.

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

@Jancade 

 

Thank you for the recommendations - I have downloaded both of them.  Three Days Missing sounds especially intriguing.

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Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

[ Edited ]

Tinkrbl44, not uncomfortable, but it’s just not a genre that I gravitate towards.

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Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

Responding to lorilori’s comment about categories on the bingo card for our winter readings: mystery, book in a series, short stories, paranormal, young adult fiction, historical fiction, biography, Michigan author/setting, comedy/humor, nonfiction, book that became a movie, romance/inspirational, NY Times bestseller, new release book, new author, Oprah’s book club, crime, your personal favorite, banned book, and an award winning book. Some of these categories were duplicated to make up 25 squares on the card. The middle space was free and there was a category of “read what you like”.

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Posts: 2,046
Registered: ‎07-12-2012

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .

 

"The Fact of a Body," by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

 

 

"Although the writing is excellent, slowly, as I got really into the book, I discovered that the subject was one in which I, as I am sure many others do, have a very difficult time reading. The author has woven her own story about having been molested as a child, by a family member, alongside a true crime story that she researched as a young law student, about a man, who was a pedophile, involved in a murder.

The two stories are so intense, that although, both hard to read, I became engrossed in the reactions of her family as well as the town’s, to this criminal, his family’s as well as the length that the trials went on, and on."

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Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Reading outside your comfort zone. . .


@Jancade wrote:

Responding to lorilori’s comment about categories on the bingo card for our winter readings: mystery, book in a series, short stories, paranormal, young adult fiction, historical fiction, biography, Michigan author/setting, comedy/humor, nonfiction, book that became a movie, romance/inspirational, NY Times bestseller, new release book, new author, Oprah’s book club, crime, your personal favorite, banned book, and an award winning book. Some of these categories were duplicated to make up 25 squares on the card. The middle space was free and there was a category of “read what you like”.


 

@Jancade 

 

Thanks, I just saw this because you didn't do @.  Glad I saw it!

 

Very interesting!  I would have trouble with romance/inspirational (unless a romance between a man and his cat counts, and then I'm all over it with "The Traveling Cat Chronicles").

 

And YA.  I just can't read YA -- unless I could push the boundaries and count Dr. Seuss or Shel Silverstein?

 

I think it's wonderful.  Wish we could do something like that here on this forum but I guess it would be unwieldy?