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Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,414
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Just wanted to mention this about the GloPRO tool....it has needles on it that are not long enough to induce collagen production inside the skin. In order to do this the needles need to be at least 0.5mm in length which the GloPRO does not have. However, the GloPRO tool is made to enhance skincare topical products by preparing the skin by using it's exfoliating needles. It cannot stimulate collagen.

Regular Contributor
Posts: 221
Registered: ‎09-30-2014

i had needled for years without issue. i researched and used proper technique. word of caution- the last time (and it will be the last time) my skin had a horrific reaction that took weeks, steroids and two derm visits to correct. i had done nothing different and used high quality roller. i'm sure people who love needling will think i had "done something wrong" but i used the same technique as my facialist for years. my dermatologist said they see this in menopausal women -hormone fluctuations can effect skin reactions. Huge immune system response. i only needled once a month-and the results were slight and not worth the risk. i would say to use caution with this technique. There are other methods like facial gua sha that are non invasive and provide microcirculation and skin benefits. hope this helps one person.

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,414
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

@gfpdem wrote:

i had needled for years without issue. i researched and used proper technique. word of caution- the last time (and it will be the last time) my skin had a horrific reaction that took weeks, steroids and two derm visits to correct. i had done nothing different and used high quality roller. i'm sure people who love needling will think i had "done something wrong" but i used the same technique as my facialist for years. my dermatologist said they see this in menopausal women -hormone fluctuations can effect skin reactions. Huge immune system response. i only needled once a month-and the results were slight and not worth the risk. i would say to use caution with this technique. There are other methods like facial gua sha that are non invasive and provide microcirculation and skin benefits. hope this helps one person.

 


 

@gfpdem,

I'm sorry that you had a reaction to the needling. Did you know that, at any time, a person can develop a metal-allergy? Most needling rollers are made of steel or titanium but allergies do occur with either because of the alloys used in those needles. I use a metal-free roller instead to avoid this kind of reaction. Check out the rollers at whitelotusantiaging dot com.Woman Happy

Regular Contributor
Posts: 221
Registered: ‎09-30-2014

@SilleeMee wrote:

@gfpdem wrote:

i had needled for years without issue. i researched and used proper technique. word of caution- the last time (and it will be the last time) my skin had a horrific reaction that took weeks, steroids and two derm visits to correct. i had done nothing different and used high quality roller. i'm sure people who love needling will think i had "done something wrong" but i used the same technique as my facialist for years. my dermatologist said they see this in menopausal women -hormone fluctuations can effect skin reactions. Huge immune system response. i only needled once a month-and the results were slight and not worth the risk. i would say to use caution with this technique. There are other methods like facial gua sha that are non invasive and provide microcirculation and skin benefits. hope this helps one person.

 


 

@gfpdem,

I'm sorry that you had a reaction to the needling. Did you know that, at any time, a person can develop a metal-allergy? Most needling rollers are made of steel or titanium but allergies do occur with either because of the alloys used in those needles. I use a metal-free roller instead to avoid this kind of reaction. Check out the rollers at whitelotusantiaging dot com.Woman Happy


thank you! i'm familiar with metal allergies but didn't think of that! Mine were always titanium! actually, the whole experience was a blessing in disguise-it made me think long and hard about what i was willing to do to "age gracefully". For me, i was combatting aging like it was war -and i don't think i want to do that anymore-frankly, i found it exhausting. i've cut back my routine, and find my skin has responded to my nourishing approach-instead of overworking the skin. It's all good now, i spend a fraction of what i use to, and if i feel the need, i will consult my derm for professional treatments. no more home remedies for me! It's been freeing-freed up time, money and an adversarial relationship with my age. My goal is to never go through anything

like that again!lol

Valued Contributor
Posts: 695
Registered: ‎03-17-2010

Re: microneedling

[ Edited ]

This is a great post. I've had several professional procedures done, but I would NEVER microneedle at home.  The risk for infection freaks me out.