Reply
Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,867
Registered: ‎07-09-2011

@tends2dogs wrote:

@Drythe wrote:

@spent2much wrote:

The hairdresser I had for 35 years started out as a barber.  He worked in salons all the time I knew him.  He retired a couple years ago and he can't be replaced!  Woman Sad

 

 


@spent2much 

 

The stylist who cut & did gorgeous comb thru highlights for me for 20 years worked as a RN for years.  Go figure!

 

I absolutely have NOT been able to replace him!  😭


@Drythe   Did he also do blood letting and remove tonsils? Woman WinkWoman Very Happy


@tends2dogs 

 

Not in his salon.  🙂

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,597
Registered: ‎03-15-2010

@Carmie 

 

Finding someone that can cut curly hair is nearly impossible.

 

Back in the late 70s, I wore a long shag and the young woman that styled my hair was amazing.  She left to have children, and never returned.  In all honesty, I have never had a decent cut since then.

 

The gal I have now isn't bad, but one day, I left the shop with my hair styled exactly like hers rather than what I had asked for.  Just had to laugh.

 

Now, I just come how and fix it myself.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,177
Registered: ‎10-25-2010

@tends2dogs wrote:

@AnitaKnapp wrote:

@x Hedge wrote:@AnitaKnapp 

The barber did an excellent job, while explaining how their training is completely different.

 

 


@x Hedge  I have never thought about the difference in training until this comment. Did the barber mention what exactly their training is? We have several beauty schools around here, but no barber schools that I'm aware of. Just very curious.


@AnitaKnapp Years ago my sister was trained as a master barber/stylist.  The training took months - much longer than a cosmetologist.  I would have to ask her just how long, I don't remember.  Anyway, the difference is they are trained to do precision cutting.  To give you an idea of what I mean is that she owned her own shop.  She had cosmetologists working there.  Within 2 to 3 weeks these women would come back in for a trim and the growing out was so uneven.  They left with a decent looking cut, but it wasn't even.....if you know what I mean.  She cut my hair for years.  If you didn't go back in for months, the haircut still looked good because it was precise.  She was also trained to shave a man with a straight razor.  They were taught color and perms, skincare, manicures, pedicures, hand massage, foot massage, many, many things.   


I was trained in precision cutting in basic beauty school back in the late 60's early 70's.  I took ongoing classes in Canada...don't remember the name of the place, but it was on Bloor Street in Ontario.  I also studied in Texas and NYC.

 

I can shave a man with a straight razor...learned how in beauty school and practiced on a balloon with shaving cream. I used to shave my father this way and still have my DH's neck. Hand massage, foot massage, etc are core things everyone learns...you need that to pass the state boards.

 

I know from many years of experience that your hair does not grow the same all over.  Every hair has it's own follicle.  Some follicles have a better blood supply and hair grows faster there.  It is very common to have one side of your hair that grows faster than the other side. The side you sleep on usually grows slower.

 

A good haircut won't change this fact.

 

You nails don't grow at the same pace either.

 

I have a cosmetologist license, but I worked for about a year in a barber shop.  Back then it wasn't legal without the correct license, but my boss hired me as an apprentice so that I could legally work in his shop.

 

I learned a few things from him and taught him a few things as well.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 921
Registered: ‎01-27-2020

I don't know that is wrong with so many stylists that they can't give a decent haircut.  I have come home so many times with the front of my hair crooked and have to fix it myself.  One time I could see how uneven it was while in the salon, showed it to my stylist and asked her to fix it.  She picked up the scisors and was about to start cutting the shorter side!  I had to stop her.

 

I also have noticed that they don't seem to care if you are happy or not.  At least with my last styist, who always had a new boyfriend every other week and began getting pre-occupied. I stuck with her for awhile because I had gone to her for about 15 years and she was good.  Then her husband passed away and she reinvented herself as a 'young, hip chick."  This was a 65 year-old woman and her boyfriends became progressively younger till the last one was 35 years her junior.  Yes, 35 years younger.

 

The last time I went to her, I noticed she started coloring my hair with what looked like a darker dye than usual.  I called her on it and she said no, it was correct.  Well, I knew what I was looking at and my hair came out much darker than I had wanted and she knew it and that she had made a mistake,  Refused to admit it and was adamant that she had done no wrong.  Didn't offer to fix it and I never went back.

 

Those who find great stylists are lucky indeed.

 

It felt good to get that off my chest!

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 22,834
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

@Tessa Mendoza    In my lifetime I have had 3 excellent stylists but certainly not lately except when this last gal cut my hair at the Barber Shop.  She knows how to cut hair and does not take long.  She doesn't rush but she knows how to cut so it does not take an hour (Amen).  I have a beef with stylists that are not that good and charge $65.  Most women would think well they have to be good charging that much -- that's not the case, in fact, they need to go back to beauty school.  LOL

kindness is strength
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,700
Registered: ‎08-18-2016

@Skye3girl wrote:

Why does a mans haircut cost 1/2 price of a woman? So wrong.

 

I find salon Stylists cut everyone's hair like it's straight hair. But I have odd wavy-curly nappy hair. When I ask them to cut it dry, they refuse. On the few times I got a salon cut I liked, I went back and they can't duplicate it because of my unpredictable hair- Gave up. I cut it myself now and I'm never disappointed!! 

 

 

@Skye3girl   born a curly haired blonde, my hair never met expectations because it has something extra. My blond hair has kinks, plus curl direction randomly & repeatedly changing from clockwise to counterclockwise and back, in the same strand. There's a direction change at each kink.

No two strands are alike so the curls don't group into nice ringlets by themselves. 

 

Wetting it and pulling it taut to cut evenly as a stylist does is not right for my hair type, as each strand of hair retracts to different lengths as soon as the stylist lets go of it.

I never found a stylist who would cut mine dry, either.

I cut my own hair too.

 

@AnitaKnapp   no, I don't recall the training he outlined.

 

But he took note of my hair whorl and cowlick, the density and kinks, and what the stylist had done the previous day.

Then he cut with the direction my hair naturally wanted to go.

 

The corrective cut he did looked good, and I remember I didn't have to fight with my hair to get it to go back to looking good day after day.

 

The stylists always cut as though I had straight hair, and expected my hair would obey the cut.