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Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎08-22-2010

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

I agree it's tied closely to sales but the only problem is if you don't carry the product you won't have sales.  Could it be  you don't have sales because you erroneously assume that one group  does not matter as much as your base group.  So, you only carry one or two products for the other group. Is there is no committment to the other group?  Just wondering...

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Posts: 481
Registered: ‎06-01-2016

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

[ Edited ]

@bbydol wrote:

I agree it's tied closely to sales but the only problem is if you don't carry the product you won't have sales.  Could it be  you don't have sales because you erroneously assume that one group  does not matter as much as your base group.  So, you only carry one or two products for the other group. Is there is no committment to the other group?  Just wondering...


Exactly! How indeed did those cosmetic companies figure out which shades were the most popular in the first place? They had to manufacture and offer them first! Obviously, I can't buy  a product that's not even offered and if a company never offers it  then how could they possibly develop an accurate estimation on  how much that product will sell? I would say that this is just common sense but, sadly, that ain't so common anymore.

 

As savvy as a lot of these companies claim to be, I truly believe that most of them still have their heads stuck in the sixties and the seventies as far as our country's constantly changing demographics in the 21st century.

 

For instance, take the ubiquitous catch-all category of "tan" when it comes to foundations, usually marketed to non Black women of color. This one shade is basically meant to accommodate: all Latinas, Indian, Middle Eastern, etc., etc., etc. skin tones. Ridiculous. Those groups have increased by leaps and bounds in the last couple of decades, literally by the millions and yet most of these companies continue to be blissfully unaware.

 

After checking out the Fenty website, it was really wonderful how they have tried to include ALL skin types. Kudos to them!

 

BTW, love Wayne Goss and also saw his very glowing review of this product line.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,480
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

It's not just for African women and it's about time someone came out with all the shades that are needed.  I will have to check out the texture when I stop in Sephora.  The price is reasonable compared to others -- only $34.  Good for you Rihanna.  Cat Tongue

kindness is strength
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,916
Registered: ‎10-09-2012

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

[ Edited ]

Also try Bare Minerals’ BarePro liquid foundation.  It comes in 30 shades!  Of course, that’s 30 shades on their own website.  Unlike QVC, which chooses to only carry it in 17 shades, with just the last 4 shades more apt for deeper/diverse complexions.  

 

There's also a BarePro Performance Wear Pressed Powder foundation, also on QVC.  QVC offers this one also in 17 shades, but Bare Minerals' own site carries it in 30 shades.

 

Sometimes it’s entirely QVC that does not want to offer shades for more complexions.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 29,745
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

[ Edited ]

Question for anyone who wants to answer it ...... WHY do you think there's less than adequate makeup options for women of color?   

 

(I can't speak to how QVC makes marketing decisions based on the research of their customer base.   QVC does a LOT of things that don't make sense to me, so let's skip that one for now.)

 

It seems to me that there are plenty of well known, influential women of color that would be great spokespersons ....  so why hasn't it happened sooner? 

 

Other than Rihanna, women who immediately come to mind are Tyra Banks, Iman, Chrissy Teigen, Queen Latifa, Vanessa Williams, Halle Berry, models Beverly Johnson or Naomi Campbell .....  there seems to be no end. 

 

Yes, perhaps some wouldn't want to break the momentum they currently have going with their careers, but plenty of other actresses and other celebrities have active careers AND promote a product line of some sort.   Even Ellen DeGeneres has a line on QVC!

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

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Posts: 481
Registered: ‎06-01-2016

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics


@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

Question for anyone who wants to answer it ...... WHY do you think there's less than adequate makeup options for women of color?    (I can't speak to how QVC makes marketing decisions based on the research of their customer base, so let's skip that for now.)

 

It seems to me that there are plenty of well known, influential women of color that would be great spokespersons ....  so why hasn't it happened sooner? 

 

Other than Rihanna, women who immediately come to mind are Tyra Banks, Iman, Chrissy Teigen, Queen Latifa, Halle Berry, models Beverly Johnson or Naomi Campbell .....  there seems to be no end. 

 

Yes, perhaps some wouldn't want to break the momentum they currently have going with their careers, but plenty of other actresses and other celebrities have active careers AND promote a product line of some sort.   Even Ellen DeGeneres has a line on QVC!

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?


Hi @Tinkrbl44. I really believe, among other things I am sure, it's as I stated a few posts ago: they are still operating on outdated assumptions about different ethnicities. They assume that creating products for deeper skin tones will be a money loser, as was the prevalent opinion in the cosmetics industry in the sixties and seventies.

 

Like others here have shared, I have very hurtful, bitter memories of desperately trying to find a decent foundation for my skin tone and repeatedly finding shades that look like a company took a pinky-beige foundation, dumped in equal parts fireplace ashes and dirt, bottled it and seemed to be saying, "Um, okay, that looks good enough for you." At least that's how it felt to me.

 

On a positive note, one of the first, if not actually the first, large cosmetic company that offered a selection of deeper shades was Revlon. I did find a shade from them that I could use many years ago but, alas, the drugstores didn't regularly carry it.

 

Hope that made sense @Tinkrbl44, LOL!

 

 

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Posts: 9,139
Registered: ‎04-16-2010

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics


@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

Question for anyone who wants to answer it ...... WHY do you think there's less than adequate makeup options for women of color?   

 

(I can't speak to how QVC makes marketing decisions based on the research of their customer base.   QVC does a LOT of things that don't make sense to me, so let's skip that one for now.)

 

It seems to me that there are plenty of well known, influential women of color that would be great spokespersons ....  so why hasn't it happened sooner? 

 

Other than Rihanna, women who immediately come to mind are Tyra Banks, Iman, Chrissy Teigen, Queen Latifa, Vanessa Williams, Halle Berry, models Beverly Johnson or Naomi Campbell .....  there seems to be no end. 

 

Yes, perhaps some wouldn't want to break the momentum they currently have going with their careers, but plenty of other actresses and other celebrities have active careers AND promote a product line of some sort.   Even Ellen DeGeneres has a line on QVC!

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?


You could also ask why they don't make shades for those of us who are very pale; very olive and so black that their skin is almost blue (my SIL).

 

In the end, it comes down to  cost. There are more who fit into the light/medium/tan/dark shade overall than those who need very pale, very dark, very olive. "oh, you can add white to the color. Oh, you can just add a white base first. Oh, you can add white powder over it. Oh......"    Shut up. I'm sick of hearing that. Yet, companies are all about the bottom line.

 

I've read many, many articles supporting this (something I've been told for more than 30 years and just recently as a few months ago). I've also read that many WOC think that there is a need for more companies to focus on specific color/ethnic groups when it comes to makeup. For example, lines just for the very pale (there is one in the UK); a line targeting Asians who tend to have more yellow in their skin (not always, however); a line targeting those who are African American/Caribbean/darker skins; a line for those with redder skintones, etc. Why? Because within those groups, the shades vary dramatically as well. I've seen drugstore and department store lines for WOC where the foundations and powders made up 8 shades; how does that help all the WOC whose colors range from light brown to almost blue? It doesn't. But that line was developed for WOC, right? So why not enough shades? I don't have the answer, I just know the frustration for many exists within many lines not just It Cosmetic's, EL owned companies, etc.

 

IMHO, Prescriptives led the charge as the offered more than 100 shades plus custom matching yet....people forget about them and we're talking 20 plus years ago they were doing this. 

 

@Tinkrbl44 I really don't have any answers. All I know is that my SIL and I have a heck of a time buying foundation, concealer and powders due to our coloring. No, Fenty doesn't work for her and it's WAY to drying for me plus...I'm not THAT pink nor THAT yellow, so...yeah.

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Posts: 7,916
Registered: ‎10-09-2012

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics


@ChazzyLady wrote:

@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

Question for anyone who wants to answer it ...... WHY do you think there's less than adequate makeup options for women of color?    (I can't speak to how QVC makes marketing decisions based on the research of their customer base, so let's skip that for now.)

 

It seems to me that there are plenty of well known, influential women of color that would be great spokespersons ....  so why hasn't it happened sooner? 

 

Other than Rihanna, women who immediately come to mind are Tyra Banks, Iman, Chrissy Teigen, Queen Latifa, Halle Berry, models Beverly Johnson or Naomi Campbell .....  there seems to be no end. 

 

Yes, perhaps some wouldn't want to break the momentum they currently have going with their careers, but plenty of other actresses and other celebrities have active careers AND promote a product line of some sort.   Even Ellen DeGeneres has a line on QVC!

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?


Hi @Tinkrbl44. I really believe, among other things I am sure, it's as I stated a few posts ago: they are still operating on outdated assumptions about different ethnicities. They assume that creating products for deeper skin tones will be a money loser, as was the prevalent opinion in the cosmetics industry in the sixties and seventies.

 

Like others here have shared, I have very hurtful, bitter memories of desperately trying to find a decent foundation for my skin tone and repeatedly finding shades that look like a company took a pinky-beige foundation, dumped in equal parts fireplace ashes and dirt, bottled it and seemed to be saying, "Um, okay, that looks good enough for you." At least that's how it felt to me.

 

On a positive note, one of the first, if not actually the first, large cosmetic company that offered a selection of deeper shades was Revlon. I did find a shade from them that I could use many years ago but, alas, the drugstores didn't regularly carry it.

 

Hope that made sense @Tinkrbl44, LOL!

 

 


@ChazzyLady @Tinkrbl44 I also think it’s outdated assumptions regarding different ethnicities buying patterns and viewer demographics.  But sticking with their low-buying-risk mentality is self-defeating.  Which shades always sellout first? The darkest shade offered.  QVC’s beauty buyers just plug in numbers and brands that they’ve had for several years, ad nauseum.

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Posts: 29,745
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics

[ Edited ]

 

@ChazzyLady @Tinkrbl44 I also think it’s outdated assumptions regarding different ethnicities buying patterns and viewer demographics.  But sticking with their low-buying-risk mentality is self-defeating.  Which shades always sellout first? The darkest shade offered.  QVC’s beauty buyers just plug in numbers and brands that they’ve had for several years, ad nauseum.

 

 

@Caaareful Shopper

 

Um ... maybe.   I think what may also be playing into this is quantities offered.   For example, if there's a foundation TSV, they may order 100,000 in Medium, 55,000 in Light and 10,000 in Deep for the day.   The Deep will likely sell out fastest.   (I'm just making up numbers here, but you get the idea).

 

Well, I'm glad this new company with a much better range of colors and tones will be a go-to source for makeup.  At least some progress has been made.

 

 

 

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Posts: 7,916
Registered: ‎10-09-2012

Re: African American Women-40 Foundation Shades-- Rihanna's Fenty Cosmetics


@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

 

@ChazzyLady @Tinkrbl44 I also think it’s outdated assumptions regarding different ethnicities buying patterns and viewer demographics.  But sticking with their low-buying-risk mentality is self-defeating.  Which shades always sellout first? The darkest shade offered.  QVC’s beauty buyers just plug in numbers and brands that they’ve had for several years, ad nauseum.

 

 

@Caaareful Shopper

 

Um ... maybe.   I think what may also be playing into this is quantities offered.   For example, if there's a foundation TSV, they may order 100,000 in Medium, 35,000 in Light and 10,000 in Deep for the day.   The Deep will likely sell out fastest.   (I'm just making up numbers here, but you get the idea).

 

Well, I'm glad this new company with a much better range of colors and tones will be a go-to source for makeup.  At least some progress has been made.

 

 

 


@Tinkrbl44 I agree with this reasoning (quantities), and it's part of my point.  IF QVC continues to stock lower quantities in deep, even after deep sells out so fast each time, why continue to stock lower quantities? 

 

Hey QVC: I've been watching for years, and it's 2017 for goodness sake.  Your tepid progress in offering a wider breadth of products is ridiculously slow. Case in point, I have fallen in love with Bare Minerals's BarePro foundation.  I buy it from their website, not QVC, because QVC does not carry my shade.  I've told my friends & family about it and they've gone straight to Bare Minerals to check it out.  That's just one example.