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QVC Customer Care
Posts: 1,220
Registered: ‎06-14-2015
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Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,436
Registered: ‎05-01-2010

@ID2 wrote:

I'm such a stickler on correct spelling. It drives me so crazy on these boards when someone spells something wrong. I just have to leave.


@ID2. Drives me crazy when someone posts ‘walla’ Instead of ‘voila’

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,049
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: their there they're

[ Edited ]

NOTE:  If I mess this up, please advise me!  LOL!!!  It is complicated!  Woman LOL

 

Advice is a noun:  Let me give you some advice!  Oh, do I need advice?

 

Advise is a verb that is to suggest or recommend, and the s sounds like a z:  We will advise you tomorrow on the ship date.  Tomorrow, you will get advice on the ship date.

 

I need your advice.

Please advise me on the issue. 

 

Not:  I need your advise.

 

When you are giving advice, you are advising them.  (noun, verb)

 

Yep!  Messed up and had to edit!  Woman Embarassed

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,643
Registered: ‎08-29-2010

I'd like to add this one to the mix:

 

                          Woman is singular, and women is plural. 

 

Oddly, when talking about males, the use of man or men doesn't usually get confused.

 

 

Strive for respect instead of attention. It lasts longer.
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Super Contributor
Posts: 447
Registered: ‎07-07-2012

Can't believe there are people who still struggle with that...

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Posts: 298
Registered: ‎01-03-2013

@mimom wrote:

Funny that you post this.  Its a pet peeve of mine.

 

Yesterday on our School District's FB page I was amazed at the number of parents sounding off about an announcement to add 1 additional day to the school year (due to snow days) without using proper English.  They were mad their kids would have to be in school but apparently need to go back themselves.


I wonder what makes so many people forget?  I can easily predict it will only get worse because the younger generations rely so much on spell check and auto-correct.  

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Registered: ‎03-08-2018

@GraceLady wrote:

@mimom wrote:

Funny that you post this.  Its a pet peeve of mine.

 

Yesterday on our School District's FB page I was amazed at the number of parents sounding off about an announcement to add 1 additional day to the school year (due to snow days) without using proper English.  They were mad their kids would have to be in school but apparently need to go back themselves.


I wonder what makes so many people forget?  I can easily predict it will only get worse because the younger generations rely so much on spell check and auto-correct.  


I know for a fact it will.  I had to help mentor someone at work who would respond to emails using Text speak.  Ugh  I woud never send a professional email with LMK at the end.

 

I get mad at myself when I post something and auto-correct changes what I wrote.  I actually go back and correct it myself when I find out.

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Registered: ‎06-17-2015

@Pook wrote:

@godi wrote:

@NickNack  Thank you so much for this. I also have confusion with that, now if someone can explain To and Too ? 


Too is used to imply intensity as in too much, too quickly, too long, too old, etc. There always needs to be an adjective after too since it shows intensity or excess.

To is used as in going to school, married to him. where I'm going to, etc.  


@Pook  There is no adjective after "too" when used as in the following:

 

"I want ice cream too." 

 

When used in a descriptive manner-then an adjective would follow.

 

"You are too serious."

 

 

""Out beyond the ideas of right-doing and wrong-doing, there is a field. I will meet you there." -Rumi
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Posts: 6,457
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

@Cakers wrote:

@Pook wrote:

@godi wrote:

@NickNack  Thank you so much for this. I also have confusion with that, now if someone can explain To and Too ? 


Too is used to imply intensity as in too much, too quickly, too long, too old, etc. There always needs to be an adjective after too since it shows intensity or excess.

To is used as in going to school, married to him. where I'm going to, etc.  


@Pook  There is no adjective after "too" when used as in the following:

 

"I want ice cream too." 

 

When used in a descriptive manner-then an adjective would follow.

 

"You are too serious."

 

Oops!  I really only use it that way but it can be used as also.  


 

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@VanSleepy wrote:

The one that gets me is affect and effect.  I know one is normally a verb and one is normally a noun.  And also to remember it as one is the cause and one is the result.  But then I sometimes forget which is which!


This used to always get me until I thought of affect as action verb.  Both start with an a.