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@mominohio wrote:

@151949 wrote:

There is a large grocery chain in the Pittsburgh area called GIANT EAGLE - Pittsburgers pronounce it  'g an iggle " very hard for non burgh folks to understand at first. There is a restaurant chain called Eat n park and Pittsburgers do pronounce every word of it but run it all together - eatnpark as one word.


 

Haven't been to one in awhile @151949 but the food used to be really good at Eat n Park. But we always did laugh at the name. Shouldn't one park before they eat?! LOL


When we were kids we would torture my Dad asking about why it wasn't called park n eat. I guess kids are kids - I bet every kid who has ever been there has ? this.

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@mominohio wrote:

@Othereeen wrote:

From  NYC..."stoop" is the front steps....

 

"the Ell" is the elevated subway that runs on suspended tracks...(You take the Ell to......"

 

From NJ..."Down the shore"...means visiting the seashore....."We went down the shore for the summmah..."

 

Pittsburgh......they drop the words "to be"....as in "It needs cleaned up" ...or "The streets need plowed" ....

 

....and "youins"  for (loosely) "you guys....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Maybe because I was raised by a mom from the Pittsburgh area, but eliminating the "to be" seems to be normal here as well, in casual speech. 

 

And I've only met one person who used the "youins" that wasn't from PA. I always assume anyone using that is from western PA.


 

 

Well, except for people purposely using it to poke fun at Pittsburger accents - I have never actually heard anyone use the words youns, youins or yinz in conversation, and I lived in Pittsburgh for 62 years.

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Wow.  Like Plaid and others, I was also born and grew up in California.  BUT, soft drinks were always called soft drinks.   Even if you go to the grocery store, and are looking for the soft drink table, the sign up there says 'soft drinks'.

 

To me, 'soda' or 'soda water' is club soda - a carbonated water without flavor.   Soft drinks, conversely, are flavored carbonated drinks.

 

so there.  Smiley Happy    

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@Othereeen wrote:

Speaking of Jersey....Remember when Tony Soprano would say "gabbagool" for the lunchmeat known as capicola??????

 

( forgive me if I call it lunchmeat....if may be some fancy kind of bacon cut....)


Italian Americans pronounce many food items differently than other people do. They use the Italian native language.  Manicotti is pronounced managoot and ricotta cheese is pronounced ra goat ta

 

ah, good ol gabagoat..  capicolla .., a delicious spiced ham.  Many times in the Italian language the c is a hard c  though most Americans pronounce it with a soft c.  

 

 I grew up in a 100% Italian neighborhood, went to an Italian school and church.   Most of my people exposure was with Italians until I went to high school.  I had no idea of what they were saying when they wanted Italian food.  We used to laugh a lot trying to figure out what we're were saying.

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@Desertdi wrote:

I am a native of Chicago.   I do NOT have an accent......YOU do (!)


 

 

LOL I agree.  I was visiting someone in Michigan and got carded at a bar.  He saw my NJ license and said, "Let's hear you say pahk tha cah."  I said, "That would be Massachusetts, but I'm from Chicago so I don't have any accent." :-) 

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I am from the South, we put things in a poke or a sak, we say ya'll come back now, we eat grits and liver mush (and love both) and we always Bless the heart of someone rubbing us the wrong way.

Don't worry, be Happy!
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@happygolfcartrider wrote:

I am from the South, we put things in a poke or a sak, we say ya'll come back now, we eat grits and liver mush (and love both) and we always Bless the heart of someone rubbing us the wrong way.


The best slang I have ever heard down south was " Close door, you're letting out all of the bought air"

 

The other term is the grocery buggy.   We say grocery cart.

 

 I couldn't beleive that McD sells grits on their breakfast menu.  That is regional for the south.

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@Carmie wrote:

@happygolfcartrider wrote:

I am from the South, we put things in a poke or a sak, we say ya'll come back now, we eat grits and liver mush (and love both) and we always Bless the heart of someone rubbing us the wrong way.


The best slang I have ever heard down south was " Close door, you're letting out all of the bought air"

 

The other term is the grocery buggy.   We say grocery cart.

 

 I couldn't beleive that McD sells grits on their breakfast menu.  That is regional for the south.


We have a lot of wonderful slangs and an awful lot of good food. McD grits are ok but not a good example. Woman HappyHeart

Don't worry, be Happy!
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I am so enjoying reading all of these!!

 

My mother was born and raised in New Jersey but moved to upstate NY when she married my dad...he was born and raised in upstate NY but was stationed in the army down in New Jersey, where they met.

 

I remember my mom always called pizza "hot pie".  And whenever she said the word "orange"  she always pronounced it "ar-ange". 

 

Growing up, we kids always called carbonated beverages "soda", yet we'd go over to my grandmother's house and she always called soda "soft drink"...and she was born and raised in upstate NY!

 

I remember at my job, I worked with a girl from the Long Island area and we got into some good natured teasing about how she said the proper thing to call deli meat was "cold cuts" and I insisted it was "lunch meat".  She said she called hamburger meat  "chopped meat" and I said "no, it's ground beef".  

Our boss always called me "Donner" and my name is "Donna".  He was originally from the Long Island area also and always seemed to replace the "a" at the end of words with an "r". 

 

I find different dialects and such so interesting...variety truly is the spice of life!

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He went the steps down.  (PA Dutch)

"Today is full of possibilities not yet achieved." ~The Silver Fox~