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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

@shaggygirl Don't get me started on this!  Obviously, any of us who own and love our pets could say they provide emotional support.  Thank heaven I don't feel the need to drag my "emotional support" cat around with me to the grocery store, etc.

Laura loves cats!
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Registered: ‎05-31-2018

Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

 


@2blonde wrote:

@shaggygirl Don't get me started on this!  Obviously, any of us who own and love our pets could say they provide emotional support.  Thank heaven I don't feel the need to drag my "emotional support" cat around with me to the grocery store, etc.


haha, lol.  I agree. 

 

And many people also don't get the difference between service dogs, therapy dogs and emotional support animals.

Honored Contributor
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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

[ Edited ]

Were there warnings with each complaint?  Where the complaints all from the same walkers?  If your daughter received several notices and didn't act on them, she may not have a leg to stand on.  If there was just one notice along with the eviction notice, she should talk with the condo management board.

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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS


@funandsun wrote:

 


@2blonde wrote:

@shaggygirl Don't get me started on this!  Obviously, any of us who own and love our pets could say they provide emotional support.  Thank heaven I don't feel the need to drag my "emotional support" cat around with me to the grocery store, etc.


haha, lol.  I agree. 

 

And many people also don't get the difference between service dogs, therapy dogs and emotional support animals.


@funandsun 

 

I think it's easy to confuse the difference between the classifications. But important to know.

Hope the OP returns w more details.

 

 

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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS


@shaggygirl wrote:

I don't really get this relatively new category (to me anyway) of emotional support animals. What does that mean? That you feel lonely when no one is around so an animal takes the place of human companionship......or what?

 

I am right there with you on this subject.  I have never exactly understood what it means either.  I have only heard of this situation in the last year or so.  I was at a college graduation recently and there were three students that had their emotional support dogs with them.  The dogs went up on stage with the graduates to get the diplomas.  


 

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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

Don't all dogs offer emotional support?

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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

[ Edited ]

 

               Here's additional clarification from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), related to @Jaspersmom's helpful information:

 

"...II. Service Animal Defined by Title II and Title III of the ADA

 

A service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. 

 

Tasks performed can include, among other things, pulling a wheelchair, retrieving dropped items, alerting a person to a sound, reminding a person to take medication, or pressing an elevator button.

 

Emotional support animals, comfort animals, and therapy dogs are not service animals under Title II and Title III of the ADA.

 

Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not considered service animals either.

 

The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability.

 

It does not matter if a person has a note from a doctor that states that the person has a disability and needs to have the animal for emotional support.

A doctor’s letter does not turn an animal into a service animal.

 

Examples of animals that fit the ADA’s definition of “service animal” because they have been specifically trained to perform a task for the person with a disability:

 

          · Guide Dog or Seeing Eye® Dog is a carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool for persons who have severe visual impairments or are blind.

          · Hearing or Signal Dog is a dog that has been trained to alert a person who has a significant hearing loss or is deaf when a sound occurs, such as a knock on the door.

          · Psychiatric Service Dog is a dog that has been trained to perform tasks that assist individuals with disabilities to detect the onset of psychiatric episodes and lessen their effects.    Tasks performed by psychiatric service animals may include reminding the handler to take medicine, providing safety checks or room searches, or turning on lights for persons with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, interrupting self-mutilation by persons with dissociative identity disorders, and keeping disoriented individuals from danger.

          · SSigDOG (sensory signal dogs or social signal dog) is a dog trained to assist a person with autism.    The dog alerts the handler to distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism, allowing the person to stop the movement (e.g., hand flapping).

          · Seizure Response Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder.    How the dog serves the person depends on the person’s needs.    The dog may stand guard over the person during a seizure or the dog may go for help.    A few dogs have learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance to sit down or move to a safe place.

 

Under Title II and III of the ADA, service animals are limited to dogs. However, entities must make reasonable modifications in policies to allow individuals with disabilities to use miniature horses if they have been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for individuals with disabilities.

 

 

III. Other Support or Therapy Animals

 

While Emotional Support Animals or Comfort Animals are often used as part of a medical treatment plan as therapy animals, they are not considered service animals under the ADA. 

 

These support animals provide companionship, relieve loneliness, and sometimes help with depression, anxiety, and certain phobias, but do not have special training to perform tasks that assist people with disabilities.

 

Even though some states have laws defining therapy animals, these animals are not limited to working with people with disabilities and therefore are not covered by federal laws protecting the use of service animals. 

 

Therapy animals provide people with therapeutic contact, usually in a clinical setting, to improve their physical, social, emotional, and/or cognitive functioning..."

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Much more info, including handler’s responsibilities and rights at the source link:

 

https://adata.org/publication/service-animals-booklet

 

⭐️Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy. Howard W. Newton⭐️
Esteemed Contributor
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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

@shaggygirl  Agree with you 100%.  And I'm seeing "emotional support" dogs more and more on airplanes and airport terminals.  I feel sorry for the animals.  

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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS

Thank you for posting the definitions of service dogs, therapy dogs and emotional support dogs @dooBdoo .  My dog definitely provides emotional support for me.  I don't know what I would do without her or my cat.  I would never try to claim her as an emotional support dog though.  

 

I think for most people who consider their dogs part of their family they provide emotional support for them.  Maybe I'm wrong, but as someone who lives alone I need the love and support of my pets.


Day after day the whole day through, wherever my road inclined, four feet said 'I'm coming with you!' and trotted along behind. Kipling





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Re: QUESTION ABOUT EMOTIONAL SUPPORT DOGS


@NickNack wrote:

Thank you for posting the definitions of service dogs, therapy dogs and emotional support dogs @dooBdoo .  My dog definitely provides emotional support for me.  I don't know what I would do without her or my cat.  I would never try to claim her as an emotional support dog though.  

 

I think for most people who consider their dogs part of their family they provide emotional support for them.  Maybe I'm wrong, but as someone who lives alone I need the love and support of my pets.


 

This is what pets usually do provide for most. But getting a Dr. note ( mainly online) can get our pets  on planes, eating places, stores, etc.