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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Shanus, II thought about the religion issue as well, but for all of the years I have been on these boards, when it comes to food and culture-and symbolic foods-people are allowed to discuss religious significance and how it applies to food. Sometimes, some things slide by the mods and other times, posts are deleted.

 

I feel that in discussing kashrut, I am explaining a fact-just as some pro-bakers have discussed things they use on the job.

 

I understand your fear of getting this thread axed however.... I just want to share, but I understand your concerns.

Hugs,

Poodlepet2

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,772
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Poodlepet2  I do a  lasagna that is also perfect for Passover (or anytime). Instead of substituting the matzo for noodles as you do, I use thin slices of zucchini or eggplant to create the layers...The meat sauce, etc. remain the same. Those slices are uncooked since they'll cook during baking. Quick & easy. I also make meat sauce in large batches & freeze in sm. containers...Can take them out any time for many different recipes.

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

Oooh-EGGPLANT!!! Last year I found this killer recipe for lasagna using Brined Roasted Eggplant: this is so worth making, but I would need to Google for specifics.  You make a brine of salt and water and cut the eggplant lengthwise into planks.  I leave the skin on, but you can remove it.  You fully submerge the eggplant in the brine (you have to weight it with a pot to keep it from floating).  I don't remember the specifics for how long you soak it and whether or not you rinse.  You do blot it very well, then place on a cookie sheet that has a nice spray of the oil of your choice. Put the planks on the sheet and give a generous spritz of oil on the top. I've probably got this wrong, but I think you roast it at 350 for 1/2 hour turning halfway through cooking time. Let it cool before assembling the rest of your dish.

 

I sampled the eggplant before layering it in the lasagna....I could have eaten it just as it was: it was wonderful! I adore mushrooms of all kinds and I can just imagine sauteed mushrooms, bell pepper, sweet onions-let's not forget lots of garlic! You could roll the mixture in the planks pinwheel style....of course, we don't use bread or pan's, but Italian seasoned bread crumbs or pan's with a generous amount of parm would be delicious!

 

Speaking of eggplant, does anybody have a eggplant dip recipe they could share? I've never made it, but it would be a nice spread on matzoh or a wrap.....

 

Wrap during Passover???? Yes, yes, yes: I buy paleo coconut wraps that are blissfully high in fiber BUT if you can't find them, Bob's Red Mill has a recipe on the back of their coconut flour. It's a crepe like batter.  I've never made them before, but it doesn't look that difficult.

 

....another thing I'm going to try is making raw tahini in the Vitamix.....

 

@Shanus, I love your recipe for chicken nuggets: my potato loving husband has made them with potato flakes and crushed potato chips.  This time of year, Lays makes chips fried in cottonseed oil: Weiss may as well. They are hard to find down here....I can't have all those carbs, but they sure are good!

Poodlepet2

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,790
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

I thought I'd add a little story to your thread. I watch a Catholic TV station and one of the elderly priests ,now deceased was a Sabbat Goy ,for a nice Jewish family

 

The neighborhood he grew up in  was an Irish ,Jewish one. He had lots of lovely stories, about working for this family. He was 14 when he left for the seminary ( school to study for the priesthood)

 

The family he worked for,  had a tailoring business. It was during the depression, and Fr G had a second hand suit, to take with him. It didn't fit ,so the tailor cut it down, and made it over for him, free of charge.

 

His wife was weeping ,at the thought of this young man leaving  them. The tailor said to him. I don't know anything about seminary life ,but you be a good boy.  Fr spoke often about the old fellow ,and what a fine person he was

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,323
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES


Shanus wrote:

I do have a fear of proofing because of "religion".

 


@Shanus

@cherry

@Poodlepet2

 

I feel the same way. I can only hope we are not stepping over the line, religion-wise (which I don't think we are).

 

Food is international, and it's not as much religion as it is heritage and tradition. I would hope that if there is something any of us post on these threads that do go over the line, the Moderator will let us know before removing anything. I know we would all appreciate that, as we all want to abide by the rules.

 

I'm getting hungry from all this food talk!

You've come a long way, baby...
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,835
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

Hello ladies,

I just am trying to catch up on all that you have been so very kind to share.  And I have to admit I'm confused but not giving up on learning what I can from you all. 

 

The Jewish Passover is usually close to the Christian Easter season and we as Christians certainly believe, and understand the holiness of Passover.  The symbolism for us is inseparable.  That is why I am particularly interested in the foods you serve during this time and the stories involved with them.  My DH is Jewish by heritage but was raised Episcopalian.  Our youngest daughter married a wonderful young man a little over a year ago who is also Jewish but is not a practicing Jew; neither are his parents.  I almost came unglued the first time I invited them to dinner which was Thanksgiving and I realized I had pork included in many things!   I was aware many  items of food may not eaten at all, I worried about what I served to drink -EVERYTHING!  Never was I so relieved that nothing I served offended them nor interfered with their beliefs but I don't want to be so caught off guard again.  I want to know everything but at my age, I also know that I won't live long enough to know what you all were raised with.  Yiddish and Hebrew-the foods, everything is just interesting to me.  I pray for Israel and her people.  We may not have quite the same beliefs, we do pray to the same God. 

 

As far as the religion thing on these boards, my understanding is so long as we are not preaching this to anyone and are not arguing about religious issues, we will be fine.  The OP started a post about Passover foods-I requested some explanations as I know I am not the only one who doesn't understand the reasons why your beliefs are as they are and the ties into the foods you serve.  I know I can't be the only one who didn't know what matzo was! LOL!  The matzo crackers I have seen but didn't know it came any other way.  All I could think of was masa which is Mexican!  I may be the lone soldier here but personally I am so looking forward to your recipes and seeing your meal plans for Passover, that I want to know the what and why to go along with it.  If this thread gets poofed, I will take full responsibility and apologize now before it happens.

 

Thank you all again for your wonderful and interesting explanations.  I at least have a great understanding about how your salmon patties taste.  Is there much difference in latkes and potato pancakes?   My DM would often make what she called potato pancakes out of leftover mashed potatoes and in my mind they are close to a latke but believe they maybe made with shredded potatoes vs. mashed and not sure what else goes in one.  I know I can google this but not sure I trust everything I google.  I believe you ladies and what you are telling us.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@cherry, iit's good to hear from you! Did you lose power because of snow???? Stay warm-and by all means, make a nice pot of chicken soup!

 

BTW everybody, I have heard about the wonders of bone broth, but I didn't want to make it just for me.  I am absolutely delighted that I was able to find chicken bone broth in my grocery! I thought about trying to make it, but I couldn't imagine making it because chicken bones are so soft.  I guess after roasting, you could wrap them up in cheesecloth while making the broth....I will have to cruise the net.

 

Until then, this ready to use bone broth shows a lot of delicious recipe potential-or sipped on its own. Sodium free and 8 gms of protein per cup: what's not to love?

Poodlepet2

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,323
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES


mustang66lady wrote:

Hello ladies,

I just am trying to catch up on all that you have been so very kind to share.  And I have to admit I'm confused but not giving up on learning what I can from you all. 

 

The Jewish Passover is usually close to the Christian Easter season and we as Christians certainly believe, and understand the holiness of Passover.  The symbolism for us is inseparable.  That is why I am particularly interested in the foods you serve during this time and the stories involved with them.  My DH is Jewish by heritage but was raised Episcopalian.  Our youngest daughter married a wonderful young man a little over a year ago who is also Jewish but is not a practicing Jew; neither are his parents.  I almost came unglued the first time I invited them to dinner which was Thanksgiving and I realized I had pork included in many things!   I was aware many  items of food may not eaten at all, I worried about what I served to drink -EVERYTHING!  Never was I so relieved that nothing I served offended them nor interfered with their beliefs but I don't want to be so caught off guard again.  I want to know everything but at my age, I also know that I won't live long enough to know what you all were raised with.  Yiddish and Hebrew-the foods, everything is just interesting to me.  I pray for Israel and her people.  We may not have quite the same beliefs, we do pray to the same God. 

 

As far as the religion thing on these boards, my understanding is so long as we are not preaching this to anyone and are not arguing about religious issues, we will be fine.  The OP started a post about Passover foods-I requested some explanations as I know I am not the only one who doesn't understand the reasons why your beliefs are as they are and the ties into the foods you serve.  I know I can't be the only one who didn't know what matzo was! LOL!  The matzo crackers I have seen but didn't know it came any other way.  All I could think of was masa which is Mexican!  I may be the lone soldier here but personally I am so looking forward to your recipes and seeing your meal plans for Passover, that I want to know the what and why to go along with it.  If this thread gets poofed, I will take full responsibility and apologize now before it happens.

 

Thank you all again for your wonderful and interesting explanations.  I at least have a great understanding about how your salmon patties taste.  Is there much difference in latkes and potato pancakes?   My DM would often make what she called potato pancakes out of leftover mashed potatoes and in my mind they are close to a latke but believe they maybe made with shredded potatoes vs. mashed and not sure what else goes in one.  I know I can google this but not sure I trust everything I google.  I believe you ladies and what you are telling us.


 

 

@mustang66lady-  I appreciate everything you just wrote. When it comes to religion, even my own, I know so little. My dear uncle was a holocaust survivor and a very religious Jew. I loved him with all my heart, and was so sad when he died about 5 years ago. He taught me a lot, not necessarily about food, but about life and how to survive.

 

Regarding food, he was Kosher, but yet he'd go out to a diner to eat with the rest of us, usually ordering eggs. If he were extremely religious, he probably wouldn't have gone out with us to eat off of plates that probably had bacon or porkchops sitting on them at one time or another. We all set our own limits. You seem to have lots of knowledge, more than many people do. 

 

Thank you for allowing us to tell you of our experiences. I hope they can help you!

 

 

You've come a long way, baby...
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,790
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

We had hurricane force winds that tore through on Wed @Poodlepet2.

 

We just now got our power restored

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,323
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES


Poodlepet2 wrote:

@cherry, iit's good to hear from you! Did you lose power because of snow???? Stay warm-and by all means, make a nice pot of chicken soup!

 

BTW everybody, I have heard about the wonders of bone broth, but I didn't want to make it just for me.  I am absolutely delighted that I was able to find chicken bone broth in my grocery! I thought about trying to make it, but I couldn't imagine making it because chicken bones are so soft.  I guess after roasting, you could wrap them up in cheesecloth while making the broth....I will have to cruise the net.

 

Until then, this ready to use bone broth shows a lot of delicious recipe potential-or sipped on its own. Sodium free and 8 gms of protein per cup: what's not to love?

Poodlepet2


 

@Poodlepet2I've heard of bone broth but never thought to look into it. I will now, and as long as it's palatable I will drink it up. 

You've come a long way, baby...

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