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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@mustang66lady, you are not alone in your feelings about defile fish-especially the stuff from the jar! Years ago, I had homemade-and I liked it-it's totally different.  I LOVE fish, so I was surprised that I never developed a taste for it.....

 

Other appetizers many of us serve might include chopped chicken liver-absolutely delicious-and fresh melon. I think the Mellon was a throwback to when our grandparents arrived from the Eastern European states. They didn't have the transportation we have now, and maybe the very rich grew it in their hot houses: this time of year, it was a delicacy! Can you imagine their delight they must have had here in the U.S. being able to afford such luxuries????

 

We live in Florida and we pretty much have millions and strawberries year round, but every Passover, I think about what they must have experienced and felt about all of the luxuries here-that they could only dream about when they were in their home countries!

 

 I so take it for granted when I buy something like a frozen Empire Turkey.....once again, that was something they could only dream about.....but so it was for virtually all of our ancestors who immigrated here from other places.....please feel free to share special Easter dishes, customs and memories......I think we can all agree if all of us shared more love and respect, the madness and hatred that goes on in this world would not exist....

 

I just want to share something.  Back in WW II, there was a organization throughout Europe - including Nazi Germany- called "The Women's Institute". They were not political : their purpose was to share knowledge of Home Economics, sanitation, and generally improve the domestic lives of families, especially the uneducated and impoverished. The English WI received the visiting German WI with open arms.....even though Germans were destroying England with bombs......they rose above all that-and put all animosity aside.

 

We women are the peace makers and one of the most wonderful ways of sharing peace is through food.

L'Chaim!

Poodlepet2

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@repellent, FYI, uncooked potato starch is healthy! It's a great prehistoric: save that potato water and enjoy a smoothie while you fry latkes.....I think I will make a batch of those in the air fryer. There are new potatoes in the duck dish I make that is kind of "pot roast", but DH has potato loving genes. You can't ever make too many potatoes for him!

Poodlepet2

 

PS- that recipe has got to be good: Andrew Zimmerman is a definite MOT)!

 

@mustang66lady, MOT is an acronym for "member of tribe"

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,835
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Poodlepet2

I have had such a wonderful time reading these posts today!  I am going to re-read them again tonight when I am not trying to do so many things but am absolutely in love with the information you are sharing.  It feeds my soul!  I have not even had time to read @sunala's post yet today but want to be a little more at peace with the day than I am at the moment.  Probably am sounding or reading like a broken record but thanks from the bottom of my heart for taking the time to share what you have.  I am going to have to take notes-seriously.  It's like being in class all over and I'm loving it!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,323
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES


Poodlepet2 wrote:

@mustang66lady, you are not alone in your feelings about defile fish-especially the stuff from the jar! Years ago, I had homemade-and I liked it-it's totally different.  I LOVE fish, so I was surprised that I never developed a taste for it.....

 

Other appetizers many of us serve might include chopped chicken liver-absolutely delicious-and fresh melon. I think the Mellon was a throwback to when our grandparents arrived from the Eastern European states. They didn't have the transportation we have now, and maybe the very rich grew it in their hot houses: this time of year, it was a delicacy! Can you imagine their delight they must have had here in the U.S. being able to afford such luxuries????

 

We live in Florida and we pretty much have millions and strawberries year round, but every Passover, I think about what they must have experienced and felt about all of the luxuries here-that they could only dream about when they were in their home countries!

 

 I so take it for granted when I buy something like a frozen Empire Turkey.....once again, that was something they could only dream about.....but so it was for virtually all of our ancestors who immigrated here from other places.....please feel free to share special Easter dishes, customs and memories......I think we can all agree if all of us shared more love and respect, the madness and hatred that goes on in this world would not exist....

 

I just want to share something.  Back in WW II, there was a organization throughout Europe - including Nazi Germany- called "The Women's Institute". They were not political : their purpose was to share knowledge of Home Economics, sanitation, and generally improve the domestic lives of families, especially the uneducated and impoverished. The English WI received the visiting German WI with open arms.....even though Germans were destroying England with bombs......they rose above all that-and put all animosity aside.

 

We women are the peace makers and one of the most wonderful ways of sharing peace is through food.

L'Chaim!

Poodlepet2


@Poodlepet2 -  Wow, I never heard of the Women's Institute! I am going to do some research on it to find out more about it. Aren't women just wonderful? We can rise above war to do what women do; nurture, protect, guard and feed our families. Thank you so much for letting us know about this. 

 

Regarding gefilte fish, my mother made the very best gefilte fish in the world, and I'm not exaggerating. My family made fun of me because as I was eating it, I'd literally purr and make sounds like I was in heaven! She told me how to make it, but I kind of got skeeved with the raw fish, and sadly, I never wrote down the recipe. I have a bare-bones recipe where she was vague about how much of any ingredient to use. I don't think she ever made it the same once.  There's a Yiddish expression for that, but if I post it here, I'll get into trouble. Okay it's kind of like "shid-arein," which means, "a little of this, a little of that." I don't think I'd ever attempt to make it, as I know it won't come close to hers. She had golden hands. And as far as the gefilte fish in a jar, all I can say is FEH. I don't care how much it's "doctored," it still tastes like FEH.

 

This is so nice, to be here together and sharing our experiences and our knowledge. I appreciate everyone's stories and history. I hope we can keep this going. Hugs to you all, Sunny 

You've come a long way, baby...
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,420
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES


Poodlepet2 wrote


 

Hillel lived 2000 years before Jesus and were very much a part of Jewish wisdom that Jesus-as a Rabbi-would have been familiar with....and much of what was attributed to Jesus was actually said by Hillel!  This is no way detracts from Jesus: if anything, I see it in a very positive way as cementing people of faith and good will together.

Many Christian churches have Passover dinners and I think it's a lovely way to learn about what Rabbi Jesus would have known about and would have grown up with.

Have a great day and welcome to "The Sisterhood"

Poodlepet2 (card carrying lifetime member of Hadassah)

 

 


@Poodlepet2  i think you meant to say that Hillel lived about 2000 years ago.  He actually is thought to have been born about 110 BCE, dying in the year 10 CE (AD)

as he is thought to have lived 120 years (!).  He is of course famous for great wisdom, most especially  for the Golden Rule and the saying "If I am not for myself, who is for me? And when I am for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?"   I think it is likely that Jesus was influenced by the House of Hillel.  Judaism and Christianity are wonderfully intertwined.   

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@sunala, tthere is a wonderful series on PBS called "Home Fires" based on the Women's Institute.  The name of the book "Home Fires" is based on a book called "Jam Busters" and it is so worth reading. I don't think this organization was given nearly enough credit for their work....I have a fascination with history and the everyday life of common people and this certainly does that! 

 

I believe you can see previous episodes on PBS dot org-and there are great story lines. Enjoy!

Poodlepet2

Valued Contributor
Posts: 562
Registered: ‎11-01-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Poodlepet2

 

I never considered drinking the potato water...

 

Thank you for the tip!   

 

The healthy smoothie will balance my overindulgent latkes.  

 

I think I have the same potato genes as your husband Smiley Happy

"'Law, not war’ is my slogan and ‘Never give up!’ is my mandate.” -Benjamin Ferencz, 96, the last living Nuremberg prosecutor
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,388
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@ms traditional, my bad! I stand corrected!

Shalom,

Poodlepet2

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,772
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

Passover Salmon Croquettes

 

1 can salmon

1 red bell pepper

1/2 lg. onion

1 egg

1 stalk celery

Matzo Meal

 

Put the onion, celery, and red pepper in cuisinart (unless you're a martyr & like to chop by hand)

 

Put the drained salmon in a bowl, break up the pieces and add contents of cuisinart.

 

Add 1 beaten egg and enough matzo meal until it looks like it will hold together. Salt & pepper optional

 

Form mixture into patties and dredge in matzo meal (both sides). Let set in frig. for about an hour.

 

Saute in pan w/ a little canola oil and a little butter (for flavor). All ingredients are cooked so when browned evenly on both sides....Supper time!

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,772
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

Passover Chicken "Nuggets"

     (little granddaughters love these)

 

Boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut in bite size pieces

S&P to taste

Roasted unsalted almonds

Matzo Meal

Butter (melted)

 

Salt & pepper the chicken pieces. Finely grind the almonds in food processor. In a bowl, combine ground almonds w/ equal amount matzo meal.

 

Roll the chicken pieces in melted butter or margarine & then in the bowl of almonds & meal to coat.

 

Bake on cookie sheet at 350 for about 35-40 min. until they're cooked/crispy.

 

****These can also be made w/ chicken breast halves (boneless, skinless) for adults. Adjust the cooking time accordingly.

 

 

 

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