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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,553
Registered: ‎07-11-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


SeaMaiden wrote:

I use my TVs until they die.  I had to get rid of my  last tube TV that still worked only because it could no longer get the new signals they use now. I always use things until they wear out. I could care less about technology and having to have the newest thing. My computer is almost 10 years old. My car is 17 years old. I do not like the new cars. To many new fangled things and not enough windows to see well.


@SeaMaiden...OMG, I think we are twins. Everything I own is old. Car is 19 yrs. old. I don't like new fangled things either. I don't have a "Smart" phone and people look at me weird when I tell them I don't have one, don't text, and don't do "apps". LOL.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,517
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

I can at least say, I get my money's worth out of my bedroom t.v.  It plays constantly.  Some days it doesn't get turned off.  I like listening in the background if I'm doing something or lounging in my chair.

 

The first flat screen tv I got stopped working.  I had it for three years.  All of a sudden it would just not come on.  I'd have to leave it be and hope it came on.  When it did come on, it stayed for about five minutes and would shut off again.  I hated that LG T.V.  I worked that tv.

 

I've had stereo equipment go bad on me too.  That also got a lot of work.  I would play it at least three-four hours on a daily basis.  I didn't replace the CD changer though.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,517
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

Yes!  When I bought my house, I went to sears for all appliances.  Back then Sears was where you went for your refrigerators, stove and stuff like that.  The last refrigerator I got from sears was able to be repaired.  It did last me quite a while though.

 

I bought a Kenmore stove that could have held up better though.


Catwhisperer wrote:

Everything nowadays is disposable. Back in the 50's/60's when I was a kid, things were repaired over and over until they could not be repaired anymore. They don't make things like they used to.

 

I would love to do away with cable TV, but DH won't hear of it. I watch very little TV. If my TV craps out, I won't be buying another one. 


 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,517
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

@Q4U, I agree.  Of course they spin it the other way!

 

Planned obsolescence is a business strategy in which the obsolescence (the process of becoming obsolete—that is, unfashionable or no longer usable) of a product is planned and built into it from its conception. This is done so that in future the consumer feels a need to purchase new products and services that the manufacturer brings out as replacements for the old ones.

 

Consumers sometimes see planned obsolescence as a sinister plot by manufacturers to fleece them. But Philip Kotler, a marketing guru (see article), says: “Much so-called planned obsolescence is the working of the competitive and technological forces in a free society—forces that lead to ever-improving goods and services.”  IF THEY ARE EVER IMPROVING WHY DO WE HAVE TO REPLACE THEM SO OFTEN?

 

A classic case of planned obsolescence was the nylon stocking. The inevitable “laddering” of stockings made consumers buy new ones and for years discouraged manufacturers from looking for a fibre that did not ladder. The garment industry in any case is not inclined to such innovation. Fashion of any sort is, by definition, deeply committed to built-in obsolescence. Last year's skirts, for example, are designed to be replaced by this year's new models.

 

The strategy of planned obsolescence is common in the computer industry too. New software is often carefully calculated to reduce the value to consumers of the previous version. This is achieved by making programs upwardly compatible only; in other words, the new versions can read all the files of the old versions, but not the other way round. Someone holding the old version can communicate only with others using the old version. It is as if every generation of children came into the world speaking a completely different language from their parents. While they could understand their parents' language, their parents could not understand theirs.

The production processes required for such a strategy are illustrated by Intel. This American semiconductor firm is working on the production of the next generation of PC chips before it has begun to market the last one.

 

A strategy of planned obsolescence can backfire. If a manufacturer produces new products to replace old ones too often, consumer resistance may set in. This has occurred at times in the computer industry when consumers have been unconvinced that a new wave of replacement products is giving sufficient extra value for switching to be worth their while.

 

As the life cycle of products has increased—largely because of their greater technical excellence—firms have found that they need to plan for those products' obsolescence more carefully. Take, for instance, the example of the automobile. Its greater durability has made consumers reluctant to change their models as frequently as they used to. As the useful life of the car has been extended, manufacturers have focused on shortening its fashionable life. By adding styling and cosmetic changes to their vehicles, they have subtly attempted to make their older models look outdated, thus persuading consumers to trade them in for new ones.

Planned obsolescence is obviously not a strategy for the luxury car market. Marques such as Rolls-Royce rely on propagating the idea that they may (like antiques) one day be worth more than the price that was first paid for them; Patek Philippe advertises its watches as being something that the owner merely conserves for the next generation. At the same time as the useful life of consumer goods becomes shorter, consumers hanker after goods that endure.

 

Further reading

Slade, G., “Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America”, Harvard University Press, 2006

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,931
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

Nothing is made to last anymore! In fact, my 5 yr old microwave GE profile bit the dust today😳

 

Its true and I never finance anything because most likely I'll be paying for it long after it's gone! 

 

We had had all our flat screens for 7 years max - in fact, we had a 56" Sony Bravia best tv ever (9 years old) - still working when I donated to a young family because hubby wanted upgrade to Sony Bravia "bells & whistles" 70".

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,517
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


homedecor1 wrote:

Nothing is made to last anymore! In fact, my 5 yr old microwave GE profile bit the dust today😳

 

Its true and I never finance anything because most likely I'll be paying for it long after it's gone! 

 

We had had all our flat screens for 7 years max - in fact, we had a 56" Sony Bravia best tv ever (9 years old) - still working when I donated to a young family because hubby wanted upgrade to Sony Bravia "bells & whistles" 70".

 

 


I had a nice 36 inch tube tv that was still kicking when I got a flat screen.  

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,974
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

[ Edited ]

Discussing this vary topic with some friends and one of them read that these new TV's usually last 5 years if your lucky......  Not like the old days when TV's would work for 20 -25 years....

 

 

Animals are reliable, many full of love, true in their affections, predictable in their actions, grateful and loyal. Difficult standards for people to live up to.
Alfred A. Montapert
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,553
Registered: ‎07-11-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?

My microwave oven is 15 yrs. old and still works great. Smiley Surprised 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,643
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


Catwhisperer wrote:

SeaMaiden wrote:

I use my TVs until they die.  I had to get rid of my  last tube TV that still worked only because it could no longer get the new signals they use now. I always use things until they wear out. I could care less about technology and having to have the newest thing. My computer is almost 10 years old. My car is 17 years old. I do not like the new cars. To many new fangled things and not enough windows to see well.


@SeaMaiden...OMG, I think we are twins. Everything I own is old. Car is 19 yrs. old. I don't like new fangled things either. I don't have a "Smart" phone and people look at me weird when I tell them I don't have one, don't text, and don't do "apps". LOL.


@Catwhisperer  My cell phone is 15 years old....I have never sent one text in my life....I only have the phone for emergencies. Never use it! We are twins!😄

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,553
Registered: ‎07-11-2010

Re: How Long Should Your new TV last?


SeaMaiden wrote:

Catwhisperer wrote:

SeaMaiden wrote:

I use my TVs until they die.  I had to get rid of my  last tube TV that still worked only because it could no longer get the new signals they use now. I always use things until they wear out. I could care less about technology and having to have the newest thing. My computer is almost 10 years old. My car is 17 years old. I do not like the new cars. To many new fangled things and not enough windows to see well.


@SeaMaiden...OMG, I think we are twins. Everything I own is old. Car is 19 yrs. old. I don't like new fangled things either. I don't have a "Smart" phone and people look at me weird when I tell them I don't have one, don't text, and don't do "apps". LOL.


@Catwhisperer  My cell phone is 15 years old....I have never sent one text in my life....I only have the phone for emergencies. Never use it! We are twins!😄


@SeaMaiden...I have never sent a text in my life either. I have a Tracfone in my purse that I turn on when I go out, in case of emergency. LOL.

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