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They dont make things like they used to

Started 1391118970.543 in Viewpoints | Last reply 1391231643.357 by ivey

Our oven just broke. (6 yrs old) Im so mad. They make JUNK now days. My parents appliances ALL lasted the entire time I was growing up until I left my childhood home AND after.

DH and I got all new appliances (washer, dryer, stove, fridge, dishwasher) the year after we got married 7 years ago (after our washer of 2 years broke).

So all of our appliances are only 6 years old. We already had the fridge fixed once (freezer part). Now the gosh darn oven to the stove is broke.

I had everything laid out to put in the oven and it needed to be baked. Now its in the garbage.

"And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make"

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Opurrra1391119232.42022 PostsRegistered 1/9/2014

Tell me about it!

ღೋƸ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒღೋ


raven-blac­kbird1391119282.5513976 PostsRegistered 1/2/2009California

no the do NOT make things like they used to and anyone involved in the industry would tell you that...........the days of an appliance lasting 10-20 years are far behind us.........................raven

"Polite conversation is rarely either."
Fran Lebowitz

MickD1391119386.7337068 PostsRegistered 2/6/2008San Clemente, CA.

Agreed! My fridge is a disaster...7 years old needs to be repaired 1-2x/year. I remember we had a manual can opener when I was growing up...it lasted 40 years.

"When someone shows you who they are believe them; the first time." ~ Maya Angelou

CelticCraf­ter1391119545.751215 PostsRegistered 11/9/2004

When the temperature regulator thing went on my oven the repairman told me they only last about 5 years - our range was about the age, maybe a bit older.

The prettiest smiles hide the deepest secrets.
The prettiest eyes have cried the most tears.
The kindest hearts have felt the most pain.
Unknown

NoelSeven1391119664.87316429 PostsRegistered 3/9/2010

I agree!

May I suggest you do quite a bit of research first, online, various sites including those at the big stores.

Check out what other people have to say before you choose.

What have they done to the earth?
What have they done to our fair sister?
The Doors

straykatz1391119744.7338526 PostsRegistered 6/13/2007

I thought my oven was in need of replacing not long ago and it was just an element that needed replaced...much cheaper than a new oven.

@-->-->---

Sometimes you just need to take a nap and get over it.

banjo1391124678.65123 PostsRegistered 6/16/2006Nebraska

I have a Hamilton Beach stand mixer that was my Mothers.It is almost 60 years old and still works really well. I make heavy cookie dough in it and it mixes everything with no problem. You can't find things like that now. Everything today is made as cheaply as possible.

You can tell who the strong women are, they are the ones building each other up, instead of tearing each other down!

Love my gr­andkids1391127089.54769 PostsRegistered 11/24/2013

It's called "planned obsolesence".

EmmaBunting1391128208.7736012 PostsRegistered 1/19/2013

I have a 32 year old microwave/convection oven that is still going strong. They certainly don't make them like that any more!

MaggieToo1391130881.8638177 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004AZ

When I worked at W. T. Grant one Christmas when I was 16, I used the money to buy my mom a Hamilton Beach stand mixer. My DS now owns it and it is 61 years old and still in working condition.

There are none so blind as those who will not see.

Shorty2U1391149823.26714630 PostsRegistered 6/24/2007PA
On 1/30/2014 straykatz said:

I thought my oven was in need of replacing not long ago and it was just an element that needed replaced...much cheaper than a new oven.

straykatz would you believe my husband looked at it then, and checked the whole thing out. The one heating element was lighting but not the other. He said the bottom element is broke because it was not on but the top one is. (same as yours- an element). Well he refuses to call a repairman so he looked online at videos that tell how to install a new element. So he ordered one directly from the company, and it should be here in 2 days. So hopefully he can fix it! Thanks for all the replies. I am more calmed down now that I know he can probably fix it but I still say (as all of you did) that they don't make things like they used to!

"And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make"

Feline Fine1391151592.264146 PostsRegistered 6/28/2013Eccentriccatladyville, USA

No reason to totally waste food, as you possibly could have made your recipe in your toaster oven/convection oven, on a grill, or on top of the stove. You could have even asked a neighbor or a friend if you could borrow theirs to cook in.

Or, donate the ingredients to someone who's food budget is extremely tight.

Man, so many people on the Q boards are so wasteful of so many things, especially stuff that others less fortunate could truly use. You've gotta improvise and think out of the box, like donating to the needy.

Last edited on 1/31/2014

*The key to lifelong YOUTHfulness* :
*Be CURIOUS
*Love to LEARN
*Keep up & grow w/ the CHANGING times











blahblahva­mpemerblah1391155993.946144 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

In the book, "Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster," the author talks about quality disappearing from all levels, and she mentions Macy's telling vendors that they want Item A at Price Y, and they don't care what corners you cut to fit those parameters. I know for a fact that LV isn't what it once was, and the author talked about Prada not being up to snuff.

It even hits homes. I think it was in 2012 or 2013 when a fire department built two homes to see how they burn. One was traditional (wood framing and such), and the other had all of the latest building materials. The traditional home gave you 13-17 minutes to get out because everything burned slower. The newer home with all the plastics only gave you 3-4 minutes to get out. Traditional methods win out, and I've found with my own experience, that the homes are sturdier, too.

Yeah, FINALLY!!!!! Run Trey, run!

mominohio1391173993.732921 PostsRegistered 8/8/2010

I agree! Nothing is made like it used to be from appliances, to cars, to clothing, to bed sheets!

I have a refrigerator that is going on 30 years old. It lost a compressor while still under warranty while it was still new. After that was replaced (free) it has been going strong all these years. I need and want a bigger and better designed one, but I can't bring myself to get one, because I know it won't last.

happy hous­ewife1391174503.8230767 PostsRegistered 1/4/2007
My washer is 3 years old -only gets used 1/2 a year as we are only here in the winter- and the timer has started making a loud clicking noise.My DH said he fully expects we will need a new timer soon.

When faced with senseless drama, spiteful criticism or misguided opinions walking away is the best way to defend yourself.To respond with anger is an endorsement of their attitude. -Dodinsky

heartkeeper1391176563.2671918 PostsRegistered 1/27/2007

They haven't made things like they used for a looong time now.

gardenman1391177814.95716810 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey

To some extent they can't make things like they used to. Government regulations regarding energy efficiency and the materials used play a huge role in the quality of the device. Old style Freon was a very efficient refrigerant that was well understood and easy to work with. But then because it was a CFC, it got banned and replacements had to be found. The replacement HFC based refrigerants are harder to work with and tend to lead to more mechanical issues. Older, bullet-proof motors that would last forever aren't efficient enough for modern appliances. To make a motor more efficient compromises have to be made. Those compromises, while increasing efficiency and saving energy, lead to a shorter life.

States like California ban a ton of chemicals and chemical compounds for fear they could be cancer causing or for other reasons, many of the compounds were widely used and now have to be substituted for. In the vast majority of the cases the substitutes are not as effective.

Well, you might say, it's a small price to pay to eliminate cancer, but in many cases the chemical/cancer link is extremely tenuous at best. We're saving the environment! Not if we're filling landfills with broken down devices.

Fifty years ago the list of materials one could use in manufacturing was nearly limitless. Every day that passes now that list of acceptable materials is getting smaller and smaller. When you take more options away from the manufacturers you end up tying their hands and forcing them to make do with less known/proven materials.

It's just a question of time until the powers-that-be decide you can't use wood as a building material since trees are so important to the environment. And you can't use bricks or concrete because their raw materials are mined and mining destroys the environment. Recycled steel could be used but only if it's from a plant that doesn't use any greenhouse gas creating combustibles for the forges. Plastic comes from oil so that can't be used due to the destruction caused by oil drilling/refining. But, you can build a house out of whatever's left. Of course, there's pretty much nothing left but dirt, but you'll figure it out. How hard can it be?

That's largely where manufacturers find themselves these days. Many of the materials that used to make devices reliable are now banned and unavailable. So, they have to change the electrolyte in a capacitor, big deal! Well, it is when that electrolyte fails and your device is rendered useless. So they have to use a different lube in a bearing, what's the problem? Well, when that lube fails and the bearing seizes it becomes a problem. So they have to improve the efficiency of a motor by fifty percent, what's the big deal? Well if that improvement in efficiency brings with it a substantially reduced lifespan then it becomes a big deal. Every action has a reaction. The more proven items you take away from a manufacturer and tell them to make do with what's left over, you make it more and more likely that the new devices will fail. When you've used a compound for fifty years, you know all of its strengths and weaknesses. When that compound is banned they have to start all over.

I'm not advocating rolling back all of the restrictions and letting anyone use anything, but people have to understand there are consequences for every action. When you ban something that's widely used and force manufacturers to substitute something else in its place, there's a pretty good chance that substitute will have issues. When you want more efficiency out of a device, then you have to sacrifice something else to get it. There's no magic wand that lets manufacturers make those adjustments without compromises and consequences. A shorter product lifespan is just one of those consequences

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

mominohio1391178552.562921 PostsRegistered 8/8/2010
On 1/31/2014 gardenman said:

To some extent they can't make things like they used to. Government regulations regarding energy efficiency and the materials used play a huge role in the quality of the device. Old style Freon was a very efficient refrigerant that was well understood and easy to work with. But then because it was a CFC, it got banned and replacements had to be found. The replacement HFC based refrigerants are harder to work with and tend to lead to more mechanical issues. Older, bullet-proof motors that would last forever aren't efficient enough for modern appliances. To make a motor more efficient compromises have to be made. Those compromises, while increasing efficiency and saving energy, lead to a shorter life.

States like California ban a ton of chemicals and chemical compounds for fear they could be cancer causing or for other reasons, many of the compounds were widely used and now have to be substituted for. In the vast majority of the cases the substitutes are not as effective.

Well, you might say, it's a small price to pay to eliminate cancer, but in many cases the chemical/cancer link is extremely tenuous at best. We're saving the environment! Not if we're filling landfills with broken down devices.

Fifty years ago the list of materials one could use in manufacturing was nearly limitless. Every day that passes now that list of acceptable materials is getting smaller and smaller. When you take more options away from the manufacturers you end up tying their hands and forcing them to make do with less known/proven materials.

It's just a question of time until the powers-that-be decide you can't use wood as a building material since trees are so important to the environment. And you can't use bricks or concrete because their raw materials are mined and mining destroys the environment. Recycled steel could be used but only if it's from a plant that doesn't use any greenhouse gas creating combustibles for the forges. Plastic comes from oil so that can't be used due to the destruction caused by oil drilling/refining. But, you can build a house out of whatever's left. Of course, there's pretty much nothing left but dirt, but you'll figure it out. How hard can it be?

That's largely where manufacturers find themselves these days. Many of the materials that used to make devices reliable are now banned and unavailable. So, they have to change the electrolyte in a capacitor, big deal! Well, it is when that electrolyte fails and your device is rendered useless. So they have to use a different lube in a bearing, what's the problem? Well, when that lube fails and the bearing seizes it becomes a problem. So they have to improve the efficiency of a motor by fifty percent, what's the big deal? Well if that improvement in efficiency brings with it a substantially reduced lifespan then it becomes a big deal. Every action has a reaction. The more proven items you take away from a manufacturer and tell them to make do with what's left over, you make it more and more likely that the new devices will fail. When you've used a compound for fifty years, you know all of its strengths and weaknesses. When that compound is banned they have to start all over.

I'm not advocating rolling back all of the restrictions and letting anyone use anything, but people have to understand there are consequences for every action. When you ban something that's widely used and force manufacturers to substitute something else in its place, there's a pretty good chance that substitute will have issues. When you want more efficiency out of a device, then you have to sacrifice something else to get it. There's no magic wand that lets manufacturers make those adjustments without compromises and consequences. A shorter product lifespan is just one of those consequences

You said it all! And said it exactly like it is. Great post, thanks!

LipstickDi­va1391179347.95337479 PostsRegistered 4/22/2005On the Lake in Ohio

Yep. My best friend recently had to replace her washer/dryer that were only 6 years old. Her previous set was close to 30 years old. They told her when she was shopping for a new set that appliances typically last about 5 years and you're lucky if they last longer.

You can't buy love but you can adopt it. Adopt, don't shop.

Moonlady1391182603.94314317 PostsRegistered 8/2/2007Upstate NY

I'll say. The days of appliances lasting for decades is apparently over (though it shouldn't be). I don't even want to throw out even small things I don't use if they were made well and long ago. I came across my mom's old original Crock-pot, haven't used it yet, but remember when she did.

That thing's not going anywhere!

__
And all your money won't another minute buy...

nunya1391184934.0639263 PostsRegistered 1/25/2006

We just fixed our heating element in the oven, I bought a new one on Amazon for 10 bucks.

My new washer kept breaking, the repairman said it was because a plastic clip now runs the transmission and they break. So instead of buying a new one, I bought an older Sears washer from my Aunt that has all metal parts.

KYToby1391199020.9771223 PostsRegistered 2/19/2012

Many times, people will buy the cheapest item available and then stare in wonder when it breaks. For instance, I paid $1,500 for a washing machine (after months of research) while my neighbor bought a used one for $300. She has had repairmen out multiple times and replaced it twice with cheap machines and wonders why.

People complain because the $8 toasters from Wal-Mart break down after a couple of months while wincing at spending $90 one a great model (not made in China). I would rather spend what I can to get the better quality than deal with shoddy merchandise,

Cakers11391201163.8113914 PostsRegistered 7/31/2007

My refrigerator is 21 years going strong.

But our washing machine konked out after 6 years. Yet the dryer is fine after 12 years.

It was cheaper to get a new washer than fix the old one; the extended warranty lapsed.{#emotions_dlg.blush}

At least the war on the environment is going well.

I know we've come a long way we're changing day to day but tell me......where do the children play?
Cat Stevens

RainCityGi­rl1391201525.6574927 PostsRegistered 12/16/2012

They certainly don't make things like they used to. Everything has built in obsolescence, sometimes in only months. Someone gave me a Javalia coffee maker. I had had it about 6 months when one of the little tabs on the swiveling filter cup broke off. I can still use it if I hold it firmly while I insert the other tab and then close the cup at the other side, but come on, why didn't they install metal tabs instead of plastic. The metal wouldn't have broken off. I don't even use the coffee maker unless i am having people over and need to brew 12 cups.

LovemyHusky1391202089.9472871 PostsRegistered 3/4/2010
On 1/31/2014 blahblahvampemerblah said:

In the book, "Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster," the author talks about quality disappearing from all levels, and she mentions Macy's telling vendors that they want Item A at Price Y, and they don't care what corners you cut to fit those parameters. I know for a fact that LV isn't what it once was, and the author talked about Prada not being up to snuff.

It even hits homes. I think it was in 2012 or 2013 when a fire department built two homes to see how they burn. One was traditional (wood framing and such), and the other had all of the latest building materials. The traditional home gave you 13-17 minutes to get out because everything burned slower. The newer home with all the plastics only gave you 3-4 minutes to get out. Traditional methods win out, and I've found with my own experience, that the homes are sturdier, too.

That sounds like a good book I will have to get that. I have to agree that the quality is just not there anymore.

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