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Has anyone ever cooked a turkey this way? TRISHA YEARWOOD'S recipe

Started 1352658828.44 in Recipe Swap | Last reply 1356906970.203 by fbm2lsm

I saw this method on Food TV this morning. Trisha Yearwood's(Trisha's Southern Kitchen-A Yearwood Thanksgiving) NO BASTE, NO BOTHER ROASTED TURKEY. I believe she said her mom always cooked it this way. She stuffed a 12 lb. turkey with veggies, seasoned it. Put it in a 500 degree oven at midnight. Turned the oven off after an hour and left it all night. She said don't open oven door of course. I've used a similar method for rib roast, but this is the first time I've heard of anyone cooking turkey this way. Anyone ever try it? It sure would be easier and free up the oven on Thanksgiving day!

""A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked." ~ Bernard Meltzer

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chickenbutt1352659145.20323567 PostsRegistered 1/16/2006chickentown

I've heard of this but I don't think I would feel comfortable with it sitting all night long in the turned-off oven. It doesn't take super long for it to cool down completely, especially in cold weather. But, hey, I have an older oven so maybe they hold the heat a lot longer now so I could be totally wrong.

For me, I'd just rather roast in a traditional, oven-on, manner. I can still plan it to be done in plenty of time to put the other things in the oven after I take it out. But that's just me and I don't make a zillion courses. :)

Bippity boppity BOOYAH!

Sunshine K­ate1352659234.0212048 PostsRegistered 11/13/2006The Beautiful Mountains & Western Sky

I won't bake a turkey or any poultry this way, it's not worth the chance of getting sick.

A couple of days ago this same topic was brought up. Maybe if you do a search you can see the responses there.

Respectfully ~
Kate

stevieb1352660259.6428241 PostsRegistered 11/4/2007

Hmmmm... It probably works, but not so sure I'd want to do it. Don't often make turkey for the holidays anyway. Maybe a small turkey breast for sandwiches, but none of us is a huge enough fan of turkey to roast a whole bird.

Infinite M­om1352661177.737446 PostsRegistered 7/18/2010

I'd be scared of salmonella. Wouldn't want my guests to get sick.

depglass1352664143.01723719 PostsRegistered 11/14/2006

I think one might have a problem if your oven isn't insulated well. I wouldn't take a chance myself. Once you have food poisoning (e coli) you will not take chances in the future.

DiAnne1352664264.4335513 PostsRegistered 9/22/2010

I agree - this does not seem safe to me.

mima1352665833.64314344 PostsRegistered 10/19/2004KS

I wouldn't consider trying it.

Mima

rondell1352666197.55713373 PostsRegistered 12/17/2009USA

I saw another thread regarding the same show with Trisha Yearwood. I absolutely would not do this. I'm too chicken to eat turkey cooked this way! {#emotions_dlg.w00t}

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GoodStuff1352675177.91314655 PostsRegistered 11/11/2008

I don't know what kind of oven Ms. Yearwood has, but mine cools down pretty quickly. I doubt an hour at 500 degrees plus an all-night hiatus in a cooling/cooled oven would work safely or reliably, especially if you're cooking a large turkey. Not for me, thanks!

gkelly57441352676773.632421 PostsRegistered 4/22/2010

his is exactly how I have been cooking my turkeys (any size), and even turkey breasts for more than 5 years, and I guarantee that it absolutely does work every time. The main thing is that once you put the turkey in the extremely hot oven and start the process, NO ONE OPENS THE OVEN DOOR until 4-5 hours later!!

I heat my oven to 500, put my rinsed turkey (even frozen turkey breasts) on a rack in the bottom of a covered roaster. I oil the skin and salt and pepper it. In the cavity I put one apple, one onion, and several stalks of celery. I add 2 quarts of boiling water, cover the roaster and put in the oven for 1 hour. Within minutes, steam is rolling out of the exhaust vent of the back stove burner. When the timer goes off after 1 hour, I turn the oven off and let the turkey cook until the oven is cool (normally 4 hours). When I take the turkey out of the oven and remove the roaster lid (which is still too warm to handle without pot holders), that turkey is always a beautiful golden brown, with a nice dark broth for gravy. There is no question about the meat being done, as the legs and wings have usually fallen away from the carcass. The meat is very moist and tender, it is still very warm, and you can well tell from the color and texture of the meat that it is done. Again, I have used this cooking method many times with a rock hard frozen turkey breast, with the same results. The very high heat and boiling water in the roaster STEAM the turkey to perfection, but if the skin is buttered, or oiled, it browns very nicely, just as if it was roasted.

I have no fear of salmonella with this cooking method, because when that food is steamed for 60 minutes @ 500 degrees, NO bacteria is going to survive and multiply in that intense heat. Every person I know who has been skeptical, but given this method a try, has admitted they cooked the perfect turkey for once, and finally made a nice rich turkey gravy as well.

----------------------------------------------

the above post was written by REDTOP on the other thread about baking turkey and thought I would share since it makes perfect sense!!

chickenbutt1352685561.2723567 PostsRegistered 1/16/2006chickentown
On 11/11/2012 GoodStuff said:

I don't know what kind of oven Ms. Yearwood has, but mine cools down pretty quickly. I doubt an hour at 500 degrees plus an all-night hiatus in a cooling/cooled oven would work safely or reliably, especially if you're cooking a large turkey. Not for me, thanks!


Yeah, I can see an hour at 500F just burning the heck out of the outside. Then you have a raw inside. Hopefully, people who try this have a Plan B, just in case. :) I can't even imagine why you would want it done first thing in the morning anyway.

Bippity boppity BOOYAH!

DiAnne1352686231.175513 PostsRegistered 9/22/2010

It sounds like you are getting steamed turkey not roast turkey.

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ritasNo1Fan1352686433.081643 PostsRegistered 7/10/2006left coast

One of the shows on the Food Network also did a receipe similar to this a few years ago. I do believe it was Miss Paula Dean! Anyway, you start early in the morning, hot oven heated @500, roast the bird for 30-45 minutes, turn the oven down to 200, and cook the rest of the day until dinner time. Do not open the oven until it's dinner time (5 PM). The turkey turned out perfect. No one got salmonella, thank god.

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starpolish­er1352731300.417925 PostsRegistered 11/14/2005

Thanks ladies! I would like to try this. I just don't think I'll do it until after the holidays. It would free up the oven for my ham and the rest of the sides. Happy Thanksgiving to all of you!

""A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked." ~ Bernard Meltzer

Britbrit131352748948.4572667 PostsRegistered 7/12/2011

I'm going to try this, NOT @ Christmas or Thanksgiving...I just want to know if it works..

Brittany



Angry Bird1352749193.0934898 PostsRegistered 10/17/2007TX

We use the brown bag method for our Thanksgiving turkey..OMgoodness, it is perfect every time...so moist and tender.

KEEP LOOKIN' UP 'cuz that's where it all is!
~Kidd Kraddick~ 8/22/1959-7/29/2013

Britbrit131352749488.092667 PostsRegistered 7/12/2011

So Angry do you use this method??? Or what one do you use???



Bleuboo1352750718.70353 PostsRegistered 2/23/2011

This is not the exact way my step father cooked turkeys. He was an Air Force chef. He always cooked his turkeys at 250 degrees from midnight on. This is the way I do it, too. The bird is delicious and I have plenty of time and room in the oven to cook the other great feast items for I Thanksgiving meal. Of course, we eat at the noon hour and enjoy leftovers in the evening.

AlAnn1352750815.17283 PostsRegistered 10/6/2011

I saw this show and was wondering if you could do it with an 18 pound turkey. I heard her say she only uses a 12 to 15 pound turkey. We get a turkey every year at work and they are around 18 pounds. Anyone know how to adjust for a bigger bird?

chrystaltr­ee1352751153.39311990 PostsRegistered 5/10/2010

I have heard of stuffing the bird with vegetables, I haven't done it. I never heard of that method of cooking the turkey, it's not something that I would try. I don't like the idea of the turkey sitting in the oven overnight. I know my mom always cooked her turkey on a low temp overnight and then she would brown it when she got up. Her turkeys were always moist, never dry.

KentuckyWo­man1352761120.3831771 PostsRegistered 10/29/2009
On 11/12/2012 Angry Bird said:

We use the brown bag method for our Thanksgiving turkey..OMgoodness, it is perfect every time...so moist and tender.

This is exactly how my mother always cooked her turkeys. She would cook them at 350 for an hour then turn in back to 250 and let it slow cook for several hours. Absolutely perfect every time.

Lynneuk1352765674.198193 PostsRegistered 11/3/2006

I always do mine the high temp way. In a 450 degree oven for 1 1/2 - 2 hours.

Perfect crisp skin and moist succulent meat.

Must have a clean oven though or it smokes :)

Southern F­ried Chick1352765885.8737069 PostsRegistered 11/17/2007
On 11/12/2012 chrystaltree said:

I have heard of stuffing the bird with vegetables, I haven't done it. I never heard of that method of cooking the turkey, it's not something that I would try. I don't like the idea of the turkey sitting in the oven overnight. I know my mom always cooked her turkey on a low temp overnight and then she would brown it when she got up. Her turkeys were always moist, never dry.

I agree. I would NOT cook mine that way either. I don't want anyone being food poisoned.

Blooming H­yacinth1352782743.21326 PostsRegistered 8/8/2007The Great Midwest

I thought it was a very interesting way to cook a turkey and plan to give it a try. She did say that you shouldn't try it with anything over 15 pounds. She also said her oven took 4-6 hours to cool off. I noted that she was using pot holders when she pulled it out of the oven, so the pan must still be fairly warm.

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment. Anonymous

RedTop1353251844.2474388 PostsRegistered 9/1/2010

I fully understand Trisha's advice not to try this cooking method with a turkey over 15 lbs., if you have not cooked by this method before.

However, I have cooked larger turkeys by this method and been successful. Essentially, if the turkey will fit in my covered enamelware roaster, it's doable. I adjust the cooking method by increasing the boiling water in the roaster to 3 1/2 quarts, increase the cooking time as much as 1 1/2 - 2 hours @ 500 degrees, and leave the oven totally untouched for 6 - 6 1/2 hours. Again, perfect turkey, with absolutely no question as to the meat being done. However, the majority of my cooking experience with this method is on a 12-14 lb turkey, since my husband and I would often receive a free turkey through our work, or with turkey breasts, since that is what my family prefers. Last Christmas I cooked 2 frozen turkey breasts at the same time by this method, and the meat was perfect. Again, the roaster is still hot enough that you need pot holders to remove it from the oven after 4-5 hours, steam escapes when you remove the roaster lid, and there is no question that the turkey is done when you see that the wings and legs have fallen away from the body. NO bacteria is going to be able to thrive in this type of cooking environment, and I have no concerns about foodborne illness. Personally, I would be more concerned about foodborne illness when cooking turkeys at a lower temperature for a longer period of time than I am with cooking by this method.

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