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Olive oil

Started 1328722352.827 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1329691926.237 by AprilFlowers
I need advice on a good olive oil that would be delicious to dip a good bread in and eat. I buy olive oil from Sam's , but it is not pleasant to dip bread in. Please can someone give me some names that I can look for in the grocery store.

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Love Roses1328727352.91710446 PostsRegistered 1/10/2007

I've never tried the Sams club olive oil. Living in California, there are many, many choices.

Some of my olive oil is from wine estates and other areas here. I do know that the extra virgin olive oil is good for dipping. Try to get one that is light and extra if not extra extra virgin. We add to the dip some balsamic vinegar and crushed dried red pepper. All three together make the whole experience wonderful.

Never Forget - The Native American Indian Holocausts!

cats021328728265.711663 PostsRegistered 12/6/2007

We use Extra Virgin Olive Oil. We've found that "brand" is really not important to us. We use store brands and have found them to be excellent.

curlywhite­dog1328729449.6376537 PostsRegistered 6/2/2005Central NJ

I use Filippo Berio Olive oil but unlike others who prefer the extra virgin oil, I find the regular is more palatable to my taste.

If you really want to jazz up your dipping oil, add some freshly grated Locatelli grating cheese to the oil and use a very crusty Italian bread...amazing.

Maria

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Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the floor in the morning the devil says "oh crap, she's up".

Hooty1328729678.55719047 PostsRegistered 9/4/2006~War Eagle Country~
On 2/8/2012 cats02 said:

We use Extra Virgin Olive Oil. We've found that "brand" is really not important to us. We use store brands and have found them to be excellent.


ITA! I learned while leaving in Crete, Greece for 2 years, that as long as it is Extra-Virgin, it doesn't matter what the brand is!

bobhurley1328733329.84784 PostsRegistered 7/24/2005

A lot of olive oils, especially in the same price range, may taste the same, but a lot don't too. If you have a Williams-Sonoma near you, they actually have a section where you can taste different oils and decide which one appeals to your taste. (Then buy it somewhere else and save a few bucks!).

I would advise looking for a few things on the label before buying in a supermarket. Italian, Greek and Spanish olive oils are all generally very good, as are many olive oils coming from California. I'd try to get oils from olives grown and bottled in the same country - something labelled like "Bottled in Spain from Turkish olives" means it probably came in in a bazillion gallon tanker ship. Make sure you're getting 100% Extra Virgin - I've seen small print saying things like "with safflower oil."

I hope that helps.

meerkitty1328734862.523256 PostsRegistered 4/25/2010

The brand does matter in supermarket olive oil. Most any are okay for cooking, but it's a different matter for dipping and salad dressing. California is up and coming in the market, but I am not familiar with any of brands from that area. The top four supermarket oils according to taste tests on America's Test Kitchens are 1: Columela, 2: Lucini, 3: Colavita, and 4: Bertolli. If you want better taste for dipping, you will need to pay more. I buy both kinds (cheap for cooking and better for dipping). Those above are not adulterated with other oils and are first run; not what's left over after first cold press. I use Colavita and Bertolli for applications where I want a "good" olive taste. I cook with the one from Sam's. If anyone cooks in your kitchen besides you, let them know the difference for economical reasons. It's a waste to use really good olive oil in a fry pan. Hope this helps.

These are two things in life that cannot be accomplished: changing facts and unsaying words.

doglover31328742448.449778 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

this is what I got when I asked for dipping oils, hope you enjoy them.

Sicilian Butter - (Dipping Oil for Italian Breads) posted by HowsYerMom­maAnEm

8 cloves garlic (about 1/2 of a head) or to taste, minced
1 1/4 cups high-quality, extra-virgin olive oil
2 to 3 pinches of salt
1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese
2 pinches red chili flakes (optional)
2 tsp chopped, fresh basil

Another idea: posted by Chuckr

Bagna Cauda...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagna_cauda

Bagna càuda, (from the Piedmontese "hot sauce",[1] alternatively written bagna caôda or bagnacauda, etymologically related to Italian root bagn-, meaning "wet") is a warm dip typical of Piedmont, Italy, but with numerous local variations. The dish, which is served and consumed in a manner similar to fondue, is made with garlic, anchovies, olive oil, butter, and in some parts of the region cream. (In the past walnut or hazelnut oil would have been used.)[2] Sometimes, truffles are used in versions around Alba.[3] The dish is eaten by dipping raw, boiled or roasted vegetables, especially cardoon, carrot, peppers, fennel[3]celery, cauliflower, artichokes, and onions. It is traditionally eaten during the autumn and winter months and must be served hot, as the name suggests.

doglover31328742488.559778 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

Originally, in Piedmont, the Bagna càuda was placed in a big pan (peila) in the center of the table for communal sharing. Now, it is usually served in individual pots (the fojòt, a type of fondue pot traditionally made of terra cotta).

and:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/08/magazine/08food-t-000.html

My husband( posted by Amanda Hesser and published November 5, 2009

prepares bagna cauda, and it has become a staple of our dinner parties because it’s delicious, involves no anxiety and encourages people to mingle around a bowl of warm, garlicky oil.

Get out your pan or that little cazuela you bought in Europe that’s been collecting dust. Assemble the olive oil, butter, garlic and anchovies that you already have in your house. Then trim that overload of vegetables from your Community Supported Agriculture and make the dish.

You can play around with the butter-to-oil ratio. Claiborne, a Francophile at heart, made his more about butter than oil. Hazan, from Emilia-Romagna, includes butter but emphasizes the oil. Plotkin, a Liguria expert, favors all oil. (I prefer more oil to butter, because I find the butter conceals the flavors of the garlic and anchovy.) Kramer cares most about the anchovy. “If someone’s going to make this dish and they’re going to take any trouble at all,” he said, “they should get salt-dried anchovies.” This type of anchovy is broader, longer, altogether a higher-quality fish.

Once you feel you’ve mastered the recipe — it might take all of three times — you can move on to the modern interpretation of bagna cauda: a whole roasted cauliflower with black garlic and a parsley-anchovy butter. Sean Brock, the chef at McCrady’s in Charleston, S.C., came up with this brilliant first course after making Claiborne’s original. It’s more involved (warning: you may have to mail-order an ingredient), but worth the trouble.

Instead of bathing the garlic and anchovy in the oil, Brock has you bathe a whole head of cauliflower in it. You use a ring mold to hold up the cauliflower in a sauté pan, then brown it by spooning over bubbling oil and butter — a process that’s fun and a little hairy — and finish it in the oven. In place of garlic, you use fermented black garlic (which is soft and woodsy in flavor) and milk powder to make a “crumble.” You slice the cauliflower into large slabs, like cross-sections of a tree, and top them with an anchovy butter and the black-garlic crumble. It’s a beautiful dish. Not bad for one that began as a vineyard snack.

Put Extra Virgin OO, the greener the better, in a jar, add fresh minced garlic, chop some fresh rosemary, cover tightly and let it sit for a few days in the fridge. The flavors will infuse into the oil. You can strain it or not. You can infuse OO for dipping with a lot of things...lemon zest, crushed red pepper, fresh ginger, fresh basil. Use it up fast because bacteria can grow. If you add only dried herbs, bacteria will not grow. posted by msmeerkat

doglover31328742763.759778 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

this is the one I now use and really enjoy

Sicilian Butter - (Dipping Oil for Italian Breads) posted by HowsYerMom­maAnEm

8 cloves garlic (about 1/2 of a head) or to taste, minced
1 1/4 cups high-quality, extra-virgin olive oil
2 to 3 pinches of salt
1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
2 pinches red chili flakes (optional)
2 tsp chopped, fresh basil

I omit the salt and also us 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of sweet dried oregano and less olive oil and don't always use the Parmesan and when I do, don't use that much.

Sounds like I sort of don't use this exactly as she has written it but is very good either way, give it a try and season to your personal preference. We don't like it too hot.

Love Roses1328752613.77310446 PostsRegistered 1/10/2007

Doglover3 - You must have many friends when you make such a wonderful dish/snack. Interesting recipe. Too, too good sounding for words. Do you use any particular bread?

Never Forget - The Native American Indian Holocausts!

doglover31328775096.3039778 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

we prefer a good Italian bread that is crispy on the outside but soft and chewy on the inside. I usually pop it in the oven just the the outer crust is toasted a bit but still very soft on the inside. This is a staple with any pasta meal.

ThinkOutsi­deTheBox1328776259.5731632 PostsRegistered 1/23/2011
meerkitty, you posted some great info. I remember a few years ago, I read an article about how manufacturers were adulterating their olive oil somehow. I forget the exact info now, but the upshot for me is that of any supermarket brands, I will only buy Colavita.

phluphy1328776775.867417 PostsRegistered 5/30/2010

Just got an email from an olive oil company in Calif. A new book out about olive oil, by Tom Mueller, called The Sublime & Scandalous world of olive oil. You can check it out for excerpts from the book. It states how bad some olive oil is and what to buy. Just an FYI for anyone interested.

Desertdi1328779921.92715944 PostsRegistered 7/14/2007Surface of the Sun

just can't get past the taste of that stuff.............

downsouth1328795189.1129 PostsRegistered 7/4/2006south of New Orleans
On 2/8/2012 downsouth said: I need advice on a good olive oil that would be delicious to dip a good bread in and eat. I buy olive oil from Sam's , but it is not pleasant to dip bread in. Please can someone give me some names that I can look for in the grocery store.

Thank you all so much! Thank you!

smhr1328797769.8573822 PostsRegistered 1/16/2012laid back and mellow town USA

I use a brand called, Paneolio ( EVOO ) and is imported from Italy. It has a mellow flavor to it and is excellent for cooking and dipping. It's hard to find an Olive Oil in my area made in Greece. I believe, they are suppose to be the superior. I suppose, I would have order one online.

hugsandkis­ses1328799015.21247 PostsRegistered 5/1/2007

We use Colavita Organic Extra Virgin, Olive Oil.

I found the 3 things you should look at when purchasing any Olive Oil (if your not familiar with this sort of stuff) is: Fragrance, Taste and Source.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil should be cold pressed and must be the First pressing of the olives to qualify that as Extra Virgin.

If you are buying Italian Olive Oil the olives should be sourced in ITALY, not Greece, Spain, Turkey etc. you have to read the label if that is important to you.

And the Color variants of Green and Variety of Fragrance depends on the weather during the growing season and the region of Italy where the olives were harvested.

Really, Olive Oil is like Wine in terms of classification.

We use our Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Raw. For cooking I blend my oil with a higher smoke point oil as to not destroy the olive oil.

Enjoy !

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"Sometimes good things fall apart so that Better Things can fall together"

Love Roses1328804342.43310446 PostsRegistered 1/10/2007

Gosh, from reading this thread I've become informed on olive oil. I sometimes just overlook things and take things for granted believing that I've got a great product. We buy cold pressed and extra virgin but never paid attention to the source of the olives. I am going to check out the book that phuluphy recommended and I will pay closer attention to the country of source now that hugs and kisses shared her knowledge.

Will try doglovers tip on toasting the bread loaf too!

Just when I thought there wasn't any more to learn.....................

Never Forget - The Native American Indian Holocausts!

Chuckr1328818649.1031162 PostsRegistered 1/2/2008Denver area
On 2/8/2012 doglover3 said:

Another idea: posted by Chuckr

Bagna Cauda...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagna_cauda


It appears that both of your posted links do not work,

at least on my computer.

So try these:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagna_Cauda

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/08/magazine/08food-t-000.html

Smile

Illinois J­udy1328832676.0731729 PostsRegistered 11/7/2007

I always buy extra virgin first cold pressed. If you have a vom Fass store near you, you can taste the oils and only buy as much as you want. It's a German company but you can google vom Fass usa. The oils and and the vinegars are great, my favorite vinegar is calamansi and we love it on salmon. And I don't even like vinegar.

Chicagoan1328834241.0472681 PostsRegistered 6/11/2008CHICAGOLAND

I make up this recipe for dipping bread with grated parmesan cheese. I also like to spread it on bread when making panini's.

Herb Oil for Dipping Bread

Ingredients:
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil (or as needed)
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a airtight container. Oil is better when it sits overnight for the herbs to marinate oil.

Robin ....

Midlife is the time we begin “to listen with our ♥ heart.”

monalisa14­521328836184.8271460 PostsRegistered 8/29/2007

Lucini evoo

Colavita evoo frutto

Gooday1328837372.3210384 PostsRegistered 1/20/2008
On 2/8/2012 doglover3 said:

this is what I got when I asked for dipping oils, hope you enjoy them.

Sicilian Butter - (Dipping Oil for Italian Breads) posted by HowsYerMom­maAnEm

8 cloves garlic (about 1/2 of a head) or to taste, minced
1 1/4 cups high-quality, extra-virgin olive oil
2 to 3 pinches of salt
1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese
2 pinches red chili flakes (optional)
2 tsp chopped, fresh basil

Another idea: posted by Chuckr

Bagna càuda, (from the Piedmontese "hot sauce",[1] alternatively written bagna caôda or bagnacauda, etymologically related to Italian root bagn-, meaning "wet") is a warm dip typical of Piedmont, Italy, but with numerous local variations. The dish, which is served and consumed in a manner similar to fondue, is made with garlic, anchovies, olive oil, butter, and in some parts of the region cream. (In the past walnut or hazelnut oil would have been used.)[2] Sometimes, truffles are used in versions around Alba.[3] The dish is eaten by dipping raw, boiled or roasted vegetables, especially cardoon, carrot, peppers, fennel[3]celery, cauliflower, artichokes, and onions. It is traditionally eaten during the autumn and winter months and must be served hot, as the name suggests.

My Uncle Primo who was from the Piedmont region of Italy made Bagna cauda a lot. However, his was made with anchovies. It always smelled terrific but I do not like fish. My mom said it did not taste fishy at all, just a little salty. They served it warm and on good Italian bread and also dipped veggies in it.

Katey12611328841500.9173061 PostsRegistered 8/30/2008Texas

I use and like Moroccan Olive Oil and Ollo Roasted Garlic.

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ThinkOutsi­deTheBox1329040585.0631632 PostsRegistered 1/23/2011
pluphy...thank you for mentioning that book! I will be checking it out.

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