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Winterizing Hibiscus potted plants

Started 1379454949.577 in In the Garden | Last reply 1379515887.117 by Tulips4U
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I live in zone 5 (suburbs of Chicago). I have 2 really healthy potted hibiscus plants, one potted Hibiscus tree and 2 little braided hibiscus in the ground that I would like to try and bring in and save. I have never done this before because it just seemed like too much trouble. I dont really have anywhere to put them and that is the problem. How do you winterize? I have an unfinished basement with one window, however there is not alot of light down there. Would they survive without alot of light??? Would they survive in the garage?

I would appreciate any input...

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JustJazzmom1379468956.49728294 PostsRegistered 11/12/2007My garden, of course!!

The important thing is to water it once a month during the winter. The lack of light will cause the hibiscus to go dormant and drop leaves. Then around May start bringing the plant into a lighted area during the day (outdoors-- but keep it under the shade of a tree). Then in the evening bring it indoors. Do this for a week or so to get the plant used to the warmer weather and the extra light. When watering, allow the soil to dry completely between waterings. Check with your finger in the soil for wet or dry conditions.

Once all danger of frost in your area has passed, put the hibiscuses out for the summer.

Remember, since the hibiscuses are in containers, you will have to increase the watering to them especially if the temps are high and the weather is hot. The air around the containers, causes the containers to dry out much faster than if the plants were in the ground.

☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼

stevieb1379469228.74730840 PostsRegistered 11/4/2007
On 9/17/2013 JustJazzmom said:

The important thing is to water it once a month during the winter. The lack of light will cause the hibiscus to go dormant and drop leaves. Then around May start bringing the plant into a lighted area during the day (outdoors-- but keep it under the shade of a tree). Then in the evening bring it indoors. Do this for a week or so to get the plant used to the warmer weather and the extra light. When watering, allow the soil to dry completely between waterings. Check with your finger in the soil for wet or dry conditions.

Once all danger of frost in your area has passed, put the hibiscuses out for the summer.

Remember, since the hibiscuses are in containers, you will have to increase the watering to them especially if the temps are high and the weather is hot. The air around the containers, causes the containers to dry out much faster than if the plants were in the ground.

Thanks for the detailed information. My mother loves hibiscus and obtains a number of plants each year, but simply lets them go at the end of summer and then obtains new ones the following year. Maybe I'll go down to her place and suggest we experiment this year, to see if we can salvage any of the plants and have them for the next growing season.

Smile

Last edited on 9/17/2013

Last edited on 9/17/2013

Bestdressed1379470356.7471359 PostsRegistered 7/14/2007

Yes Stevie is correct. I live in same zone and used to bring my hibiscus indoors in the fall.

All the leaves will fall off (quite messy)...and it will look dead. But new leaves will sprout and plant will flouish outside in Spring. I do notice it flowers less if you do this for a few years.

luvpoos1379501697.3536133 PostsRegistered 5/3/2006Kingston Ma
On 9/17/2013 stevieb said:
On 9/17/2013 JustJazzmom said:

The important thing is to water it once a month during the winter. The lack of light will cause the hibiscus to go dormant and drop leaves. Then around May start bringing the plant into a lighted area during the day (outdoors-- but keep it under the shade of a tree). Then in the evening bring it indoors. Do this for a week or so to get the plant used to the warmer weather and the extra light. When watering, allow the soil to dry completely between waterings. Check with your finger in the soil for wet or dry conditions.

Once all danger of frost in your area has passed, put the hibiscuses out for the summer.

Remember, since the hibiscuses are in containers, you will have to increase the watering to them especially if the temps are high and the weather is hot. The air around the containers, causes the containers to dry out much faster than if the plants were in the ground.

Thanks for the detailed information. My mother loves hibiscus and obtains a number of plants each year, but simply lets them go at the end of summer and then obtains new ones the following year. Maybe I'll go down to her place and suggest we experiment this year, to see if we can salvage any of the plants and have them for the next growing season.

Smile

Last edited on 9/17/2013

What good info, I have one in a container and I am going to try it this year. Thanks for sharing.

you can't always get what you want, but if you try sometime, well you just might find, that you get what you need...The Rolling Stones

gardenman1379507987.49317173 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey

Just be forewarned that some hibiscus are better at going dormant than others. I've had some that have tried to keep growing regardless of what I do and those generally die unless you can keep them really well lit. I've had others that go dormant no matter what you do and then start growing again in the spring. They'll look dead, but as soon as spring rolls around new shoots will appear.

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Tulips4U1379510240.323215 PostsRegistered 11/15/2006

So are you saying that it does need light (as in next to a big window) in the winter, or should I keep it in a dark place? I really would like to try keeping mine.

Bestdressed1379513901.9471359 PostsRegistered 7/14/2007

Yes, they need light and water. I kept mine in our basement next to the sliding door window.

Tulips4U1379515887.117215 PostsRegistered 11/15/2006

Thanks -

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