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Verizon Wireless Phishing Scam (Text)

Started 1396114009.627 in Electronics Talk | Last reply 1396320581.153 by Lynnj

Just a heads up for you if you are a Verizon Wireless customer. I received a text message sent to my cell phone today. It came across as a "free text message", and looked like some of the other Verizon Wireless alert text messages I've received in the past.

However, it said "for my security, my online account has been locked. Click on the following link to sign in". The link had a VZN Wireless address, and some other letters after that. It wasn't the standard verizonwireless.com type of address. Do not click the link and give your login information.

Before I clicked the link, I called Verizon Wireless to see if this was legit. They said it is not, and is a scam. They would never send any message, either by text or email, to ask for my login information. This is someone looking for your account information, and would take over your account and charge up hundreds of dollars of overseas calls and other charges.

Here is a link to the online forum at Verizon, where it appears others have received this same type of message in the past, but via email.

https://community.verizonwireless.com/thread/814261

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nutmeg31396121546.8634576 PostsRegistered 6/18/2007NJ

Thank you very much this information. VZN Wireless could let their customers know about this.

Lynnj1396150436.26316179 PostsRegistered 12/26/2006

You are welcome. I just didn't want anyone to fall for this. Got to be really careful about clicking on any links everywhere. Thieves are very smart. They should spend as much time thinking of way to do good in the world, like curing cancer.

dooBdoo1396220050.22315218 PostsRegistered 6/27/2010Beautiful Southeast USA

Hi, Lynnj! Thanks for posting this warning. I always appreciate your posts -- I've learned so much from the information you share.

I wanted to add: They're also making robocalls in attempt to gain access to personal and possibly financial information.

They're calling from 800-922-5534 (this is the current number, but they change their called ID once it's discovered and reported).

The recorded message asks you to login to a website to claim a $74 credit (in the past the dollar amount has varied). They direct you to a website (74verizon.com -- WARNING, DO NOT GO THERE) which is a dangerous fake and looks exactly like a genuine Verizon site. I looked it up and it's a brand new site based in the Dominican Republic. They want you to use your login info on their site so they can capture it, login to your real Verizon account, and steal your information.

If anyone receives these calls, please report them to your phone service carrier (and to Verizon, additionally, if that's not your provider). Block the numbers and for goodness sake don't call them back or sign onto their website trap.

Please be vigilant and aware of these hoaxes. They can cause significant damage and heartache.

Some active online reports:

http://whocallsme.com/Phone-Number.aspx/8009225534

http://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-800-922-5534


~★~ "You don't have to disrespect and insult others simply to hold your own ground. If you do, that shows how shaky your own position is.” ~Red Haircrow

glb6131396220543.6910798 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

Unfortunately, the people who really need to know will never read the warning.

dooBdoo1396222328.14315218 PostsRegistered 6/27/2010Beautiful Southeast USA
On 3/30/2014 glb613 said:

Unfortunately, the people who really need to know will never read the warning.

Hi, glb613! I hope you're wrong. I guess the only thing we can do it try and keep sharing "in your face" messages so more people will be aware and protected.

Once someone experiences identity theft they become acutely mindful of the long-term, widespread damage that can be done.{#emotions_dlg.crying}


~★~ "You don't have to disrespect and insult others simply to hold your own ground. If you do, that shows how shaky your own position is.” ~Red Haircrow

glb6131396222988.72710798 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

I'd like to think I'm wrong but I know I'm not. The people who get scammed aren't on message boards or social media.

A neighbor's Mom got taken for $20,000 by scammers pretending to be her grandson. You know the scam where a relative calls needing money to get out of jail or some other bad situation. Her Mom never called to verify her grandson was out of the country because she was told not to and was scared. She has mild dementia and you can't fix that. Unfortunately, people with diminished capacity are the ones that fall for the scams despite all of the warnings. I'm sure this scam won't be any different.

jackthebear1396223344.4635431 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
On 3/30/2014 glb613 said:

Unfortunately, the people who really need to know will never read the warning.

probably

just keep posting the info

glb6131396227541.910798 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
You can post but it doesn't mean the ones who need the information will read it.

dooBdoo1396227596.2215218 PostsRegistered 6/27/2010Beautiful Southeast USA
On 3/30/2014 glb613 said:

I'd like to think I'm wrong but I know I'm not. The people who get scammed aren't on message boards or social media.

A neighbor's Mom got taken for $20,000 by scammers pretending to be her grandson. You know the scam where a relative calls needing money to get out of jail or some other bad situation. Her Mom never called to verify her grandson was out of the country because she was told not to and was scared. She has mild dementia and you can't fix that. Unfortunately, people with diminished capacity are the ones that fall for the scams despite all of the warnings. I'm sure this scam won't be any different.

I do see what you mean. Maybe more of those who are active on social media need to try and pass the info along to their friends and family who aren't. That's so sad about your neighbor's mom. I remember reading a thread in which the poster were discussing how they could protect their loved ones who were having trouble discerning valid phone calls from scams and telemarketing schemes.


~★~ "You don't have to disrespect and insult others simply to hold your own ground. If you do, that shows how shaky your own position is.” ~Red Haircrow

Q_spirit1396260594.771087 PostsRegistered 7/23/2013

thank you for this thread of warning op. (-:

“We shall find peace. We shall hear angels, we shall see the sky sparkling with diamonds.” (Anton Chekhov)

glb6131396261807.64710798 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
On 3/30/2014 dooBdoo said:
On 3/30/2014 glb613 said:

I'd like to think I'm wrong but I know I'm not. The people who get scammed aren't on message boards or social media.

A neighbor's Mom got taken for $20,000 by scammers pretending to be her grandson. You know the scam where a relative calls needing money to get out of jail or some other bad situation. Her Mom never called to verify her grandson was out of the country because she was told not to and was scared. She has mild dementia and you can't fix that. Unfortunately, people with diminished capacity are the ones that fall for the scams despite all of the warnings. I'm sure this scam won't be any different.

I do see what you mean. Maybe more of those who are active on social media need to try and pass the info along to their friends and family who aren't. That's so sad about your neighbor's mom. I remember reading a thread in which the poster were discussing how they could protect their loved ones who were having trouble discerning valid phone calls from scams and telemarketing schemes.

It's a real problem especially with the elderly. But, it isn't only the elderly who get scammed. People reading an e-mail from "Microsoft" and believe it's real. How would Microsoft get your e-mail address? Same thing happens with scam e-mail from a bank or credit card. People don't think things through before acting.

It also happens with phone calls like my neighbor's Mom. They threatened to hurt her grandson if she called anyone. How would they know if she called anyone? They wouldn't. Because she doesn't have good critical thinking skills, she believed the whole scam. The first thing I would have done is call my family. You can warn and warn but there will still be lots of people who fall for it.

Lynnj1396320581.13316179 PostsRegistered 12/26/2006
On 3/30/2014 dooBdoo said:

Hi, Lynnj! Thanks for posting this warning. I always appreciate your posts -- I've learned so much from the information you share.

I wanted to add: They're also making robocalls in attempt to gain access to personal and possibly financial information.

They're calling from 800-922-5534 (this is the current number, but they change their called ID once it's discovered and reported).

The recorded message asks you to login to a website to claim a $74 credit (in the past the dollar amount has varied). They direct you to a website (74verizon.com -- WARNING, DO NOT GO THERE) which is a dangerous fake and looks exactly like a genuine Verizon site. I looked it up and it's a brand new site based in the Dominican Republic. They want you to use your login info on their site so they can capture it, login to your real Verizon account, and steal your information.

If anyone receives these calls, please report them to your phone service carrier (and to Verizon, additionally, if that's not your provider). Block the numbers and for goodness sake don't call them back or sign onto their website trap.

Please be vigilant and aware of these hoaxes. They can cause significant damage and heartache.

Some active online reports:

http://whocallsme.com/Phone-Number.aspx/8009225534

http://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-800-922-5534

Thanks for your kindness, dooBdoo. Great that you mentioned the robo calls too. Scam artists are very sneaky, and will get to you through any means they can think of. Just goes to say...you cannot trust everything you read or hear. In this day and age you need to question everything. If you are being contacted directly by someone either by text, email, or phone, and it is something out of the ordinary or you didn't solicit the contact then you need to question it.

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