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Anyone Have Any "Depression Era" Recipes?

Started 1316967764.863 in Recipe Swap | Last reply 1336937652.31 by mdmc

I'm making something today that my father said they used to have when he was a child growing up during the depression. I'm sure mine is a simplified version of it, because I use a canned sauce. His mother just used to call it "Lickdob." Lickdob was anything thrown together to make a meal. The Lickdob I'm making today is yummy. Here goes:

Lickdob

1 lb. browned ground beef (cooked & drained)

1 small onion (chopped)

1 clove garlic (smashed and chopped finely)

Any type of pasta that you have on hand...cooked (as much as you want)

1 26 oz. can Del Monte spaghetti sauce (or Ragu sauce...or any brand)

1 small can mushrooms (optional) - drained

Brown the ground beef with the onion and garlic. Drain fat. Cook pasta separately. Drain. Combine pasta with ground beef and mushrooms, and pour spaghetti sauce over it. Mix well. Heat thoroughly.

Can be creative with this recipe. Use ground turkey if you prefer, whatever type of pasta you choose, and your favorite spaghetti sauce.

It's just inexpensive comfort food...yummy.

A tongue has no bones, yet it is strong enough to break a heart. Be careful with your words.

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millieshops1316968250.09314618 PostsRegistered 3/15/2007

Tabbychic-

My mom used to use your ingredients minus the pasta and sauce. After she browned the mixture, she spread it on a dough she made from Bisquik. It went into the oven. Unfortunately, I don't have any other specifics, but I remember this being a favorite week-night dinner. Funny, because it was either a way to use ground leftover beef roast or a way to stretch a bit of ground meat. We were a large family without much money, but my mom was great at feeding us tasty meals without breaking the bank.

3blackdogs1316968505.23746 PostsRegistered 3/19/2006

Spanish Pork Chops (way too easy!!)

Brown chops and put into casserole. Pour tomato sauce thinned slightly with water over the chops and cover with sliced onions (you can add green pepper also). Cover and bake at 375 for 45 minutes.

My grandmother and mom both made this and I make it quite often. My husband and boys like it and it's just way too easy.

sunshine451316968622.89740761 PostsRegistered 1/13/2007east coast and west coast

this is a great site for foods of the decades..... it is informative AND fun to read.....

http://www.foodtimeline.org/fooddecades.html#1930s

Our days are happier when we give people a bit of our heart rather than a piece of our mind. - author unknown

forrestwolf1316969244.2276012 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia

SPAM{#emotions_dlg.w00t}, I know, people laugh at me if I mention spam......From the stories and recipes passed on to me, my family did not know there was a depression, until some moved to "town", and our family found out we were poor......There was always meat (not ground beef), pork, chicken, and plenty of vegetables......I can remember that one of the 1st things my Mom fell in love with after moving to town, was a sandwich{#emotions_dlg.biggrin} She had never heard of such a thing.....I do have a lot of recipes from the Civil War, but not the depression era.......I will try to rack my air head, and see if I can come up with some....But again, coming from Southern rual families..........not sure..........Oh, and my families lived on creeks, so there was always fish, long before city folk thought of fish.....

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Last edited on 9/25/2011

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

alarmclock1316969386.8731882 PostsRegistered 6/20/2006

I LOVE SPAM!

He has a right to criticize, who has a heart to help. ~ Abraham Lincoln

forrestwolf1316970869.9076012 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia
On 9/25/2011 alarmclock said:

I LOVE SPAM!

{#emotions_dlg.tt1}

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

Brinklii1316971487.2210277 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004Northern WI

I love Spam too. My favorite Spam is one you don't see much...Hot & Spicey. You can make it yourself by just putting a few drops of tabasco sauce on it and then heat it up. Mmmmm.

A tongue has no bones, yet it is strong enough to break a heart. Be careful with your words.

Brinklii1316971589.2710277 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004Northern WI
On 9/25/2011 forrestwolf said:

....I do have a lot of recipes from the Civil War, but not the depression era.......I will try to rack my air head, and see if I can come up with some....But again, coming from Southern rual families..........not sure..........Oh, and my families lived on creeks, so there was always fish, long before city folk thought of fish.....

Last edited on 9/25/2011

Forrestwolf ~~ If you have any good Civil War recipes, please post them! Thanks! My dad grew up in the country, so he always talked about fishing too. His mother did something great with bullheads...skinned them and soaked them in milk before cooking.

Sunshine45 ~~ Thanks for posting the site...I'll take a look. Sounds fascinating.

Millieshops ~~ That sounds like it would be a great recipe. I love to experiment, and I love Bisquick. Thanks for the idea.

3Blackdogs ~~ Wow! Those sound like some yummy pork chops. Pork needs something extra like that these days, because they make the pork so lean it lacks flavor. I'll give it a try.

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Last edited on 9/25/2011

A tongue has no bones, yet it is strong enough to break a heart. Be careful with your words.

murbo1316973107.191074 PostsRegistered 3/10/2007

On youtube, there is a woman in her 90s who has videos of depression era recipes. Just search for Clara's depression cooking. She is really cute. Here's one she calls the Poorman's Meal. She tells little anecdotes about what she remembers about that era. She mentions how she had to quit highschool because she didn't have money for stockings. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OPQqH3YlHA&feature=relmfu

I would love to have her as a neighbor!

Brabls1316973257.7214740 PostsRegistered 4/27/2007

My grandmother would boil up a pot of whole potatoes. When they were done, she would call everyone, hand out forks, and have a potato party. Everyone would grab one out of the pot in their fork & eat it off the fork.

What you describe isn't real depression food: its just "Hamburger Helper" made from scratch.

irishalo1316975601.223120 PostsRegistered 8/1/2010

The above recipe reminds me of American chop suey that I would eat as a child. oh so good.

sunshine451316976313.6940761 PostsRegistered 1/13/2007east coast and west coast

tabbychic..... we call your recipe macaroni and beef goulash.....it is a great basic and you can add or subract ingredients as needed to make it "different". it is also good with chopped red or yellow peppers.

i can remember my great uncle telling me they used to eat fatback sandwiches on white bread....i am pretty sure no one wants to be eating THAT again. they also used to make sandwiches out of the bologna casings once the balogna was finished!

Our days are happier when we give people a bit of our heart rather than a piece of our mind. - author unknown

cocomom1316976764.5531018 PostsRegistered 8/4/2010

Seeing this thread reminds me of how much I loved the old" Taste of Home" magazine. I renewed my subscription then cancelled because they have changed so much.

I want to see the recipes and meals I remember as a child that were simple, inexpensive, and easy to make.We never had much gowing up so the meals were very "creative".

I think a lot of people no longer have that old fashioned, homey atmosphere to be around, at least not where I live!

I miss it!(there are no older people in our family--almost my entire family passed away back in the 70's--my DH and I have been the oldsters since then--and I was only 27 at the time)!

I love to come on Recipe Swap for that very reason,I almost always find something that reminds me of family and togetherness, esp when people tell their little stories--like the potato story above, Thanks to everyone who participates! You may not realize how uplifting it is to others who read your postsSmile

ps I love Spam too

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Last edited on 9/25/2011

Brinklii1316980719.52710277 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004Northern WI
On 9/25/2011 Brabls said:

My grandmother would boil up a pot of whole potatoes. When they were done, she would call everyone, hand out forks, and have a potato party. Everyone would grab one out of the pot in their fork & eat it off the fork.

What you describe isn't real depression food: its just "Hamburger Helper" made from scratch.

Well, hamburger helper got their idea from things that people threw together during the depression. LOL. My dad ate stuff like that all the time growing up...whatever they had on hand went in the pot.

My dad also talked about eating sandwiches made of cold sliced potatoes and sliced onions with a little butter. Also...cold baked bean sandwiches.

Also, he said he would walk to school in the winter with a hot baked potato in each pocket to keep his hands warm. Then he would eat the baked potatoes cold for lunch!

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Last edited on 9/25/2011

A tongue has no bones, yet it is strong enough to break a heart. Be careful with your words.

Pixie Jo1316982351.5133511 PostsRegistered 7/4/2009

Spaghetti & Eggs

- Scrambled Eggs (like a side dish)

- Spaghetti with the following sauce: Campbell's Tomato Soup, Small chunk of butter, salt, pepper & a little water

Cottage Cheese & Noodles

- Melt and brown some butter in a pot, add cooked super fine noodles, then add a container of cottage cheese

Pixie Jo

forrestwolf1316988232.9676012 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia

Now, back to the depression........brains and eggs, oil sausages, cornbread and buttermilk, a lot of nights potatoes alone, Chess pie, cornmeal gravy, crackling bread, Indian fry bread, these are things that I was told by family that they ate.......my family lived out "in the country", so there was always meat, bread, and vegetbles, and rarely did they go to town to buy anything, and sandwiches were not something from my family's past.......

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

banjo1316989222.2635124 PostsRegistered 6/16/2006Nebraska
On 9/25/2011 alarmclock said:

I LOVE SPAM!

I like Spam and so does my husband. When we lived in Hawaii, the restaurants had it on the menu for breakfast. I like to serve it with baked beans.

You can tell who the strong women are, they are the ones building each other up, instead of tearing each other down!

forrestwolf1316989519.5376012 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia

Well, I typed in a lot of recipes from the civil war, even 1 from Martha Washington, and I hand typed them all..............NOW POOF{#emotions_dlg.angry} I guess the Q did not like the civil war......any way, it will have to be another day......as it did take some time.........

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

olewoman1316990581.4672106 PostsRegistered 10/19/2008only my friends
On 9/25/2011 alarmclock said:

I LOVE SPAM!

Me also with eggs yummy

In-x-s1316991949.522553 PostsRegistered 3/24/2007Location, location, location

My mother always use to talk about lard spread on bread with a sprinkle of sugar on it. Can't say that I've ever tried it though!!

GoodStuff1316993297.3814655 PostsRegistered 11/11/2008

Many old-fashioned recipes for one-pot or one-container dishes like stews, pasta dishes, casseroles, hearty soups, etc. were ways to stretch a little bit of meat with potatoes, pasta, rice, garden veggies, and other less expensive ingredients to feed a family. My mother said her mother used to always keep a pot simmering on the back of the old wood stove, and odds and ends, garden veggies, and leftovers would be added as they came available to create an ever-evolving soup. Mom's family (twelve kids living on a southern farm in the midst of the depression) would often have that soup and cornbread for at least one meal of the day.

I haven't eaten Spam in years, but Mom grew up with it and used to serve it from time to time. It really isn't too bad sliced and browned in a skillet with a little butter or oil.

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Last edited on 9/25/2011

PYTNPLC1316994100.503151 PostsRegistered 9/25/2011

Hi. MILLIESHOPS the recipe is (was) on the box of Bisquick, we ate this about twice a month. It was thier quick pizza bake, You might be able to ask on thier website.

poobear11316996243.91261 PostsRegistered 5/26/2008Pennsylvania
On 9/25/2011 murbo said:

On youtube, there is a woman in her 90s who has videos of depression era recipes. Just search for Clara's depression cooking. She is really cute. Here's one she calls the Poorman's Meal. She tells little anecdotes about what she remembers about that era. She mentions how she had to quit highschool because she didn't have money for stockings. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OPQqH3YlHA&feature=relmfu

I would love to have her as a neighbor!

@murbo: She is a blast...love her! Although I am not of that era, I do make some of her recipes which were made by my grandmother! Please do check out YouTube for her recipes and your local bookstore for her cookbooks!

Although my Mom passed when I was young, two of her sisters are who are 81 & 89 are in great health & are wonderful cooks...I have learned so much from them. I am compiling a family cookbook!

poobear

Brinklii1316996436.43710277 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004Northern WI
On 9/25/2011 forrestwolf said:

Well, I typed in a lot of recipes from the civil war, even 1 from Martha Washington, and I hand typed them all..............NOW POOF{#emotions_dlg.angry} I guess the Q did not like the civil war......any way, it will have to be another day......as it did take some time.........

Well, thanks for trying. A lot of things have been going "poof" lately.

A tongue has no bones, yet it is strong enough to break a heart. Be careful with your words.

forrestwolf1316996577.1876012 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia

Now, I see several of you listing pasta......where I grew up, it was white/black only......no Irish, Italian, Jewish, or truly ethnic people until I was out of high school, and that was in 1980.......we were divided by Methodist, Baptist, and the likes......and I was about to enter high school before I ever had my 1st pizza, and in high school before I ever had Chinese food........so, I know that was not around in the depression.........besides, my family cooked the same things over and over from the farm, even after they were able to go to a grocery store of any value, and most of the depression generation and just after have all died out.......and children today do not care one bit about learning how to cook........and that is not a blanket statement, it is the ones I come in contact with, and I work a lot with high school kids, and very young adult prisioners, and it amazes me what these people eat{#emotions_dlg.crying}

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

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