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POTTY TRAINING PUPPY APARTMENT...WOW !!!!!!...LOOKS IDEAL !!!!!!!!!!!!

Started 1323617917.6 in Pet Lovers | Last reply 1323721270.527 by kittyfan

Ran across this by accident on youtube.....makes so much sense....better than crate training ...in my opinion....anyone know about these or have it???

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Doxie1323621602.859069 PostsRegistered 7/1/2007

?

doxie

chickenbutt1323622786.6724221 PostsRegistered 1/16/2006chickentown

also ?

But I would add, since it was mentioned in the post, that crate training is no way to potty train.

Bippity boppity BOOYAH!

hungarian41323624753.4731423 PostsRegistered 8/28/2010

I don't like the idea of crate training either.....but my little chi has been put in crate when I go shopping for couple hrs.....this crate has separate section divided wall for pee area...soooooo if my chi had to go before I came home...she has a separate section...made more sense than just a crate...for short periods of leaving her occasionally.

chickenbutt1323628677.38724221 PostsRegistered 1/16/2006chickentown

I'm with you on that, Hungarian! My guy is crate-trained for nite nite (he's grown now) and if I have to leave to go grocery shopping or out to lunch, or if the husband and I go out to dinner. It keeps him safe and it's never been a place of punishment so he likes it. All he has to hear is either the tv being turned off at night (for nite nite time), and he goes right in there, or me saying 'mom has to go to...' and before I can finish the sentence he is in there.

For potty, however, I guess I just never understood why crating was a good idea. Unfortunately, what you have to do with a puppy is anticipate his/her need to go after eating, playing, sleeping, and about every 15 minutes otherwise. If you keep taking him/her outside anticipating his/her need to go and giving big kudos or a small treat, he or she learns quickly that that is what is done. Part of it is instinctual anyway, but people have to be able to be there and take them out frequently until they understand the need to 'ask' to go out for potty. :)

Bippity boppity BOOYAH!

JLLH3581323629050.535032 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

Crate training is a great way to potty train - and was the only thing that worked for our older dog. It's not a problem and isn't cruel. Dogs tend to like their "dens" and will not mess it up. I don't understand the comments about it not being necessary. It works quite well -- and of course the idea isn't to leave the puppy in there indefinitely, but only for the maximum amount of time they can be expected to hold it (depends on age) - or less if that long is not needed (usually only at night would longer times be needed), take them out immediately (no conversation or playing first!) and put them outside with the potty command. To this day our older dog LOVES her crate and goes in it when she wants some "alone" time. She also prefers to travel in it. Clearly it was never considered a "punishment" by her or us!

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Last edited on 12/11/2011

happy hous­ewife1323635952.45731991 PostsRegistered 1/4/2007

People only think crate training is bad if they don't really understand the way a dog thinks. Professional dog trainers all use crates. There are many people who own dogs that think the dog is a little furry person and has all the same mentality and needs as a person.

Both of our dogs(weimaraners) came to us from the breeder already crate trained so all we had to do was show them the area in the yard where we wanted them to go. One of the advantages of researching and finding a first class breeder. I am not one for rescue dogs because often you are getting another person's problem - often inability to housebreak or biting -or incessant barking and those are things I would not tolerate in a dog.

When faced with senseless drama, spiteful criticism or misguided opinions walking away is the best way to defend yourself.To respond with anger is an endorsement of their attitude. -Dodinsky

JLLH3581323636367.135032 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
On 12/11/2011 morning lover said:

People only think crate training is bad if they don't really understand the way a dog thinks. Professional dog trainers all use crates. There are many people who own dogs that think the dog is a little furry person and has all the same mentality and needs as a person.

Both of our dogs(weimaraners) came to us from the breeder already crate trained so all we had to do was show them the area in the yard where we wanted them to go. One of the advantages of researching and finding a first class breeder. I am not one for rescue dogs because often you are getting another person's problem - often inability to housebreak or biting -or incessant barking and those are things I would not tolerate in a dog.

Have to disagree about "rescue dogs". They are often the result of poor owners, and were "dumped" because the owners were the problem, not the dogs. There are few, if any, problems which cannot be addressed by a loving owner. Of course that is the question. Any dog can be housetrained and dogs do bark. Easy enough to address both with positive reinforcement. Ditto with biting. Very few dogs in rescues or pounds are problem dogs or have the issues you have mentioned. Very few. The problem was the owner, not the dog. That's a popular misconception and sadly enough it keeps great dogs from being adopted sometimes.

Agreed that crates aren't bad, but disagree that the "needs" of people and dogs are necessarily different. Dogs need love and attention also. They are pack animals and need to be with their pack, but they also enjoy their "den" space.

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Last edited on 12/11/2011

happy hous­ewife1323636882.3531991 PostsRegistered 1/4/2007
On 12/11/2011 JLLH358 said:
On 12/11/2011 morning lover said:

People only think crate training is bad if they don't really understand the way a dog thinks. Professional dog trainers all use crates. There are many people who own dogs that think the dog is a little furry person and has all the same mentality and needs as a person.

Both of our dogs(weimaraners) came to us from the breeder already crate trained so all we had to do was show them the area in the yard where we wanted them to go. One of the advantages of researching and finding a first class breeder. I am not one for rescue dogs because often you are getting another person's problem - often inability to housebreak or biting -or incessant barking and those are things I would not tolerate in a dog.

Have to disagree about "rescue dogs". They are often the result of poor owners, and were "dumped" because the owners were the problem, not the dogs. There are few, if any, problems which cannot be addressed by a loving owner. Of course that is the question. Any dog can be housetrained and dogs do bark. Easy enough to address both with positive reinforcement. Ditto with biting. Very few dogs in rescues or pounds are problem dogs or have the issues you have mentioned. Very few. The problem was the owner, not the dog. That's a popular misconception and sadly enough it keeps great dogs from being adopted sometimes.

Agreed that crates aren't bad, but disagree that the "needs" of people and dogs are necessarily different. Dogs need love and attention also. They are pack animals and need to be with their pack, but they also enjoy their "den" space.

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All I can say is you are entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to mine. I will always take the pure bred over the rescue dog.

When faced with senseless drama, spiteful criticism or misguided opinions walking away is the best way to defend yourself.To respond with anger is an endorsement of their attitude. -Dodinsky

JLLH3581323637350.2235032 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
On 12/11/2011 morning lover said:
On 12/11/2011 JLLH358 said:
On 12/11/2011 morning lover said:

People only think crate training is bad if they don't really understand the way a dog thinks. Professional dog trainers all use crates. There are many people who own dogs that think the dog is a little furry person and has all the same mentality and needs as a person.

Both of our dogs(weimaraners) came to us from the breeder already crate trained so all we had to do was show them the area in the yard where we wanted them to go. One of the advantages of researching and finding a first class breeder. I am not one for rescue dogs because often you are getting another person's problem - often inability to housebreak or biting -or incessant barking and those are things I would not tolerate in a dog.

Have to disagree about "rescue dogs". They are often the result of poor owners, and were "dumped" because the owners were the problem, not the dogs. There are few, if any, problems which cannot be addressed by a loving owner. Of course that is the question. Any dog can be housetrained and dogs do bark. Easy enough to address both with positive reinforcement. Ditto with biting. Very few dogs in rescues or pounds are problem dogs or have the issues you have mentioned. Very few. The problem was the owner, not the dog. That's a popular misconception and sadly enough it keeps great dogs from being adopted sometimes.

Agreed that crates aren't bad, but disagree that the "needs" of people and dogs are necessarily different. Dogs need love and attention also. They are pack animals and need to be with their pack, but they also enjoy their "den" space.

Last edited on 12/11/2011


All I can say is you are entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to mine. I will always take the pure bred over the rescue dog.

That's a shame, but of course your choice. There are many "pure breds" in pounds and rescues who are there through no fault of their own. That is the case with the vast majority of dogs, btw. Of course one has to truly love animals and not think of them as decorator accessories as some do and those who end up in pounds and shelters are the victims of poor owners who did just that. Animals need to be loved and treated as members of the family. Certainly there's an aspect of training involved, but they are more than just little furred automatons to never step out of line.

Never said you weren't "entitled to your opinion"...Good grief! I would assume that goes without saying yet it's repeated as some type of mantra on these boards.

hungarian41323652772.021423 PostsRegistered 8/28/2010

Hey....time out...lol......now has anyone seen the potty training apartment????...If I am out to store or whever...with this it is nice to know that they DO have a separate potty area to go...rather than try to hold it...or worse yet have a accident !!! It always bothers me about leaving and what if dog has to go bathroom...after 1 or so...

hungarian41323652899.8771423 PostsRegistered 8/28/2010

btw....after watching dog whisperer...I am convince us humans for the most part just don't have the skills,etc...to take care of so many of a dogs issues...we do out best....but treat most of our furbabies like babies...not a dog...or us as a pack leader...didn't mean to go on and on.....full moon!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

JLLH3581323663167.7075032 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

I pulled it up on youtube. I don't see it as a good option to truly "housetrain" the dog and teach them to go outside. I think if your plan is to have your dog use it like cats use a litterbox and don't plan to have them go outside this might be an option for you. However, if you plan to teach your dog to go outside I think this will likely confuse him/her.

In addition, many cat owners battle the "smell" of the litter box. Don't forget that while using a litter box may be pretty much instinctual for a cat, you would be training your dog to go inside your house (albeit in the box). If you decide later that this is not what you really can live with you might find it quite difficult to "untrain" your dog and get them to go outside.

I take issue with the video on a few claims: the "cruelty" of the crate method being one (the key is to adjust your expectations to the age of the dog), and the inability of a puppy to "hold it" for any length of time (again, as long as the expectations are reasonable and in line with the dog's age, this is not an issue); and the idea that hotels require dogs to be "crated" (Pet-friendly hotels do not insist on this, unless the maid is coming in and there is an issue there, but those situations can be mitigated. When we took our older dog with us and had to leave her, they only asked for a phone number so we could be called if she started barking or howling and disturbing other hotel guests. It was never needed.)

I had to chuckle when the video came to the (to my mind inevitable) idea that "Many like this so much they have decided to make it their dog's permanent pottybox." I would imagine so since nowhere is the dog trained to go anywhere else. Outside is not an option and once the dog is trained to go inside, good luck with that!

All in all I would be very wary and careful with this device because you really have to want the dog to go inside and not try to use it as a housetraining method to teach them to go outside. I don't see the dog "getting" that idea if this device is used. So it would very much depend on what your expectations and ultimate goals are. HTH.

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Last edited on 12/11/2011

BriggsiePe­awiggle1323698906.097949 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004
On 12/11/2011 JLLH358 said:

Have to disagree about "rescue dogs". They are often the result of poor owners, and were "dumped" because the owners were the problem, not the dogs. There are few, if any, problems which cannot be addressed by a loving owner. Of course that is the question. Any dog can be housetrained and dogs do bark. Easy enough to address both with positive reinforcement. Ditto with biting. Very few dogs in rescues or pounds are problem dogs or have the issues you have mentioned. Very few. The problem was the owner, not the dog. That's a popular misconception and sadly enough it keeps great dogs from being adopted sometimes.

Agreed that crates aren't bad, but disagree that the "needs" of people and dogs are necessarily different. Dogs need love and attention also. They are pack animals and need to be with their pack, but they also enjoy their "den" space.

Last edited on 12/11/2011

AMEN! Amen on the rescue dog thing/bad owners and amen on dog needs. I used a crate with all my dogs when they were pups and I was going out to work. As soon as they were able, they were free in the house, and all of them learned that if they messed up by chewing something they weren't supposed to, they needed the crate still. Eventually they all "got it." I would NEVER leave my dog in a crate, outside or alone when I am home. My dogs are my family. I want them with me -- yep on the bed, on the couch. I don't care. That's what a good vacuum is for. I love my furry boys. I have two of them, and both of them are just great little pals....totally well behaved and house trained. Neither would EVER want to mess in the house, and neither touches anything of mine. They have a huge bucket of toys and know its for them. But the crate was certainly handy for training purposes. (I'd never expect a young pup to hold pee for any longer than an hour or two though. I got my rescues at 6 month or better. I checked with my vet and asked how long they could hold their weewee and they always went out for that purpose with me before I left them.)


kittyfan1323721270.5275924 PostsRegistered 11/6/2008Central Tx

Just got my latest rescue. When I pick up her leash she stops to let me hook her up. She's a two year old terrier---very sweet gal. She takes care of business when I take her outside. It's all about establishing a routine. When I turn the tv off and tell my guys it's time to go "nite nite" they usually beat me to the bedroom.

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