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Deep Fry with Oil in Pressure Cooker

Started 1277232018.917 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1277518440.463 by AlexK

David Venable or Bob Warden - Hi

I understand that it is suggested not to deep fry by everyone I know - BUT!

How did the Col. KFC do it?

I plan to cook for a large group at a family gathering and would like some direction to use that proven short method - 8 minutes I've been told, and I own a 6 qt Farberware Digital cooker I bought from QVC a few years ago, a stove top canner 12 qt, and misc. other pressure cookers - presto etc.

Thanks for any feedback

Dave Grooms dhgrooms@hughes.net

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kiddo1277232313.68310263 PostsRegistered 12/6/2006

Don't do it! Don't even TRY it!!

He didn't use a pressure cooker. He used something else.

"... All KFC style chicken is cooked in large, commercial, restaurant-grade, heavy-duty pressure fryers."

This is an example of a commercial fryer used to cook that famous chicken.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read your owners manual. You absolutely, positively CANNOT use your little old pressure cooker (or your canner) as a pressure fryer.

* A pressure cooker is NOT a pressure fryer.
* A pressure 'frypan' is NOT a pressure fryer.

Manufacturers specifically warn against cooking large amounts of oil under pressure. Read your manual, pressure cooker instructions warn against using any amount of oil over 1/4 cup.

You cannot safely use your pressure cooker for frying in oil unless you have actually purchased a pressure fryer and the owners manual specifically states this is possible.

Boiling oil at 400 degrees is a scary thought, and under pressure it's terrifying.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read at the bottom of this Web page to see what Miss Vickie recommends for achieving the same thing as the Colonel did for "frying chicken," WITHOUT using a pressure cooker OR a pressure fryer.

I Want to Make Chicken Just Like the Colonel

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Be kind; Everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
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kiddo1277232940.98310263 PostsRegistered 12/6/2006

Miss Vickie says -->

If you can't afford a pressure fryer, and you can't use your pressure cooker for boiling oil under high pressure, what will you do?

Well, you certainly can use the bottom as a deep fat fryer on the stove WITHOUT pressure. A heavy stainless steel pot, like the bottom of a pressure cooker, makes an excellent pot for frying fish, chicken, fritters, donuts, French fries, etc. Your pressure cooker is a multi-purpose pot, use it often and use it well.

Use a spatter screen and not a regular lid. Don't use the pressure lid when using the bottom for deep frying because the high heat and spattering oil may damage the seal.

Last edited on 6/22/2010

Last edited on 6/22/2010

Be kind; Everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
----
Invite Jesus to POSSESS your heart. (And your mind, your thoughts, your actions, your words, your dreams, your plans.)

Chuckr1277239703.961162 PostsRegistered 1/2/2008Denver area

Do NOT ever use a Pressure-Cooker for Pressure-Frying. {#emotions_dlg.scared}

As 'scribo' indicates, these are 2 totally different animals.

KFC Colonel Harland Sanders originally used a MODIFIED 16qt Mirromatic (which he called "Big Bertha") as indicated by his USA patent 3245800 :

http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/about1169-kfc.html

and, his Canadian patent 595461 :

http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/about1168-kfc.html

Tons more of KFC information, including Pressure-Fryers, can be found at:

http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/index.php?mforum=kfc

You might be interested in an old Low-Pressure (5lbs) "Chicken Bucket", by Wearever...

Looks like this (they made 4qt and 6qt models): Smile

http://cgi.ebay.com/WEAREVER-CHICKEN-BUCKET-PRESSURE-FRYER-COOKER-6QT-Book-/140418391870?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20b1969f3e

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Nightowlz1277252487.419210 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

Mine says not to fry in it. I would not recommend it if it states not to fry in the manual. Have you ever seen the huge pressure cookers Chick-Fil-A uses to fry their's in. Hubby has used our turkey fryer outside to fry chicken in. He has also cut up a turkey breast breaded it & fried it. It's fast & easy & no mess in the house. So if you have a turkey fryer or know anyone that does try that. Use peanut oil. It's fast & you can do quite a bit at a time. It would work for your large group.

“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” Will Rogers

AlexK1277252636.4932541 PostsRegistered 3/1/2010

You could cook the chicken in a pressure cooker until close to done and then fry it in a deep fryer or pan.

nutmeg31277254675.464571 PostsRegistered 6/18/2007NJ
On 6/22/2010 nightowlz said:

Hubby has used our turkey fryer outside to fry chicken in. He has also cut up a turkey breast breaded it & fried it. It's fast & easy & no mess in the house. So if you have a turkey fryer or know anyone that does try that. Use peanut oil. It's fast & you can do quite a bit at a time. It would work for your large group.

You may want to consider oven fried chicken, or frying in a turkey fryer in your yard.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/oven-fried-chicken-recipe/index.html

Poodlepet1277262256.9933222 PostsRegistered 9/21/2006Punta Gorda Florida

AlexK, I would suggest no such thing .That being said, I think it would be an absolute fiasco.

Pressure cooking any meat infuses it with liquid and breaks down muscle tissue...I can't even imagine trying to bread it and frying....No way....one of the Big Provisos of deep frying is always make sure your critter-be it meat, poultry, fruit or vegetable-needs to be DRY.

I don't mean to "yell" or chase you away: this is truly a friendly forum for cooks of all levels. Please take my comment in the spirit for which it is meant: safety!

There is a group I belong to called "Cooking with Shoekitty" and I've gotten to know these people very well and I always sign off with "Hugs"..so, I welcome you AlexK. I'm not the 'queen" of this board by any means, but good to see you here!

Hugs,

Poodlepet

WhammerJam­mer1277408433.87372 PostsRegistered 1/26/2006

I have a recipe for 'skillet' fried chicken made in a pressure cooker using the '5' pound setting. I've never made it but have been intrigued by it.

1 cup vegetable oil
1 egg, beaten
2 cups milk
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp msg (Accent)
4 tbsp salt
1 tbsp seasoned salt
6 boneless skinless chicken breasts

Pour the oil into the pressure cooker and heat over medium heat to abut 400°F, Combine egg and milk in small bowl. In separate bowl add all dry ingredients and mix together well. Rinse chicken breasts and set on plate. Have platter ready for coated chicken pieces. One breast at a time, place in milk/egg mixture and then transfer to flour mixture. Completely coat and place on cookie sheet. Continue until all pieces are coated. Dispose of flour and milk/egg mixture. Oil should be hot at this time. Place chicken pieces in single layer in oil in pan. Lock lid into place and bring up to pressure, reducing to low temperature once full pressue has been reached. Cook 8-10 minutes at full pressure. Set pan off heat source and use quick release method to reduce pressure. Remove lid and return to heat source. Turn chicken and brown second side, cooking an additional 4 to 6 minutes with lid off. Remove chicken from pan and place on clean platter covered with paper towels to drain off excess oil. Repeat cooking method until all chicken pieces have been cooked. Serve hot. 4 to 6 servings.

There are other recipes for skillet cod and skillet pork chops. Have tried none of them.

bobhurley1277409470.327784 PostsRegistered 7/24/2005

Another vote for don't do it, and let me tell you why. First of all, all the posters who say there is a special type of pressure fryer used by restaurants are absolutely correct. I know Todd Wilbur said to pressure fry in a pressure cooker in one of his books, but that was reckless, at best. If you did this, you'd run a very good chance of generating such heat in the pot that the rubber gasket might very well melt. You would then have boiling hot oil spewing out of the pot at high pressure. Potential tragedy would be putting it mildly.

AlexK1277518440.4632541 PostsRegistered 3/1/2010
On 6/22/2010 Poodlepet said:

AlexK, I would suggest no such thing .That being said, I think it would be an absolute fiasco.

Pressure cooking any meat infuses it with liquid and breaks down muscle tissue...I can't even imagine trying to bread it and frying....No way....one of the Big Provisos of deep frying is always make sure your critter-be it meat, poultry, fruit or vegetable-needs to be DRY.

I don't mean to "yell" or chase you away: this is truly a friendly forum for cooks of all levels. Please take my comment in the spirit for which it is meant: safety!

There is a group I belong to called "Cooking with Shoekitty" and I've gotten to know these people very well and I always sign off with "Hugs"..so, I welcome you AlexK. I'm not the 'queen" of this board by any means, but good to see you here!

Hugs,

Poodlepet

Fair enough, but simply pointing out you disagreed and the reasons why would be far less off putting. Your post conveys the impression that I somehow need your permission to post here. Simply say I don't think that's a good idea because . . . The kinds of recipes exchanged on these boards make it clear the overall cooking skill here is low. I didn't need you to point out the fact that I can post here despite being such a hopeless cook.

I certainly have no intention of either pressure cooking or deep frying chicken. It was just a thought. Vacuum sealing the chicken or allowing it to dry overnight in the fridge would solve the problem of it's being wet. Brining the chicken in buttermilk prior to frying is a common technique, and it gets the chicken wet. People simply allow it to dry out afterward. But I think there are lots of more sensible solutions where the OP could prepare a chicken dish in advance to solve her last minute time constraints. She could even serve the fried chicken cold.

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