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Seeded Muscat Raisins - A source for the rare person who may be interested. (wink!)

Started 1325801247.32 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1325817454.243 by ambermoon

I actually doubt there will be many folks who'll remember those sticky, dark Muscat raisins, but for those who do, they just might agree that back when they were readily available, there was no better raisin to use when making bread or anything else raisin-y.

Before Christmas this year, my 90 year old mom assigned me the task of finding those missing Muscats! To my surprise, I found an online article about that very thing, & coincidentally it was titled 'The Mystery of the Missing Muscats'. {#emotions_dlg.laugh}

At the top of the article, a source for them was given, though they have to be bought in 5# bulk. I ordered some, & my mom excitedly made raisin bread for us to have at Christmas. It was wonderful, & I've gotta tell you...those raisins DID make a difference!

Here's the article w/ source for purchase, if anyone is so inclined. You just never know. {#emotions_dlg.rolleyes}

The Mystery of the Missing Muscats!

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bigkat1325804736.9433929 PostsRegistered 2/4/2010West Michigan

I get your Wink, some may think you are odd winking at everyone....kind of like seeing dot's.................

I have never had these, or even heard of them, interesting!

Sabatini21325804807.182995 PostsRegistered 11/13/2010

bigkat, "odd"? Guess I've been called worse!

Pelham1325804894.493833 PostsRegistered 6/15/2006

I had forgotten all about those! They are good. SunMaid acts like they really don't want you to buy them, though. Without the exact link, you can't track them down on their site. What's up with that?

Found another site that claims they have developed a seedless Muscat which is smaller and won't need to be sliced for cooking. Wouldn't be the same without the stickiness. Confession: I always want to call these Muscrat for some reason and then that god-awful song starts in my head (you know the one I'm talking about).

forrestwolf1325805119.746025 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia
On 1/5/2012 bigkat said:

I get your Wink, some may think you are odd winking at everyone....kind of like seeing dot's.................

I have never had these, or even heard of them, interesting!

I resemble that{#emotions_dlg.lol}

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

Lynneuk1325805901.238250 PostsRegistered 11/3/2006

I've never heard of them....how do they differ from regular raisins?

The recipe for the bread looks good...would it work with regular or golden raisins?

Sabatini21325805910.752995 PostsRegistered 11/13/2010

Pelham, I know what you mean. I don't get it either! Don't they want to sell their product? Weird.

forrest, glad to see I'm in good company!

forrestwolf1325806574.276025 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia
On 1/5/2012 Sabatini2 said:

Pelham, I know what you mean. I don't get it either! Don't they want to sell their product? Weird.

forrest, glad to see I'm in good company!

Only the best for you{#emotions_dlg.wub} By the way.......did you see my recipe in the January recipe gameCool

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

Sabatini21325806581.5332995 PostsRegistered 11/13/2010
On 1/5/2012 Lynneuk said:

I've never heard of them....how do they differ from regular raisins?

The recipe for the bread looks good...would it work with regular or golden raisins?

Lynne, I learned a thing or 2 when I read the article.

Here's what was said, & it also mentions golden raisins:

Late in the nineteenth century, a certain California grape grower, a Mr. William Thompson by name, imported a seedless variety of grape... It would soon bear his name, to wit, the Thompson Seedless Raisin. This small black seedless raisin rapidly became very popular with consumers. It was not sticky on its surface because being dried from a seedless grape it did not have to go through a de-seeding procedure which inevitably produced stickness. Within a few years of its introduction, the Thompson Seedless Raisin virtually took over the retail raisin market in California and elsewhere in the United States. The raisin market, which had long been dominated by traditional Muscat Raisins became to be dominated by Thompson Seedless Raisin. The sticky Muscats were then relegated to the role of specialty item. The commonly seen golden raisin is actually a Thompson Seedless Raisin which has been oven-dehydrated and treated with sulfur to keep its golden color.

But to answer your question, Muscats are larger & have a richer, more intense flavor. They really are wonderful for baking, & I don't think any other raisin is comparable, though that's JMO.

Sabatini21325806665.8472995 PostsRegistered 11/13/2010
On 1/5/2012 forrestwolf said:
On 1/5/2012 Sabatini2 said:

Pelham, I know what you mean. I don't get it either! Don't they want to sell their product? Weird.

forrest, glad to see I'm in good company!

Only the best for you{#emotions_dlg.wub} By the way.......did you see my recipe in the January recipe gameCool

Yes, I did! It's quite similar to my mom's,...though she uses the grated rind from 2 lemons. TY for your recipe!

ambermoon1325817454.243439 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004Northern California

I think muscat raisins would be very good. I have a muscat grapevine and the grapes are delicious, I have made jelly from them. Sometimes you can find muscatro wine, a dessert wine and on the sweet side. I belong to a wine club to a winery that specializes in white wines and they have a white muscat which is on the dry side. It's a great grape.

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