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My pecan pie didn't set up- help

Started 1324697700.357 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1325197086.067 by judgejudith

I baked it 50 min, but when I cut it, it was still runny. Can I put it back in the oven tomorrow? It's in the refrigerator for tonight.

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proofer1324698253.731166 PostsRegistered 11/8/2004Southern Illinois

Being in the frig. overnight it may thicken up. Afraid if you cooked it more your crust would be ruined. Had the same thing happen to me today with a from scratch choc. pie, it has thickened since it has been in the sev. hours. Figure they can eat in bowl!!!!!lol

betteb1324698559.33316504 PostsRegistered 1/1/2008The Land of Oz
On 12/23/2011 proofer said:

Being in the frig. overnight it may thicken up. Afraid if you cooked it more your crust would be ruined. Had the same thing happen to me today with a from scratch choc. pie, it has thickened since it has been in the sev. hours. Figure they can eat in bowl!!!!!lol

ITA with proofer. It will thicken some and it will still taste good.

I usually use and extra egg to insure my pies set up nicely and they do need to be allowed to cool completely.

"God forbid you ever had to walk a mile in his shoes. 'Cause then you really might know what it's like to sing the blues" Everlast

dollydogsg­irl1324706321.693594 PostsRegistered 7/19/2010

That has happened to me before. Did you use Karo syrup? I follow the recipe on the side of the bottle of light Karo and it comes out good. HTH

smhr661324910342.72384 PostsRegistered 9/5/2010Laid Back and Mellow Small Town USA

What pie crust did you use? I had that same problem with a pecan pie not setting up and blamed it on the pie crust. I always use Pillsbury pie crust found in the frozen food section and it always works well for my pie's. I once used Marie Callenders frozen pie shell and it didn't work with my pecan pie.

By the way, I always use the Karo recipe for pecan pie and never had a bad experience. The only time was when using the Marie Callender pie shell. I also noticed the Marie Callender pie shell was harder than Pillsbury. Never will buy that brand again!

mature, dry, sensitive, makeup optional skin. keep it healthy with NIA24, MD Forte, physical sunscreen and Fancl cleanser.

Lynneuk1324912608.9938260 PostsRegistered 11/3/2006

I recently bought a cast iron pizza pan that I keep on the bottom shelf of my oven. This year I decided to bake my pecan pie directly on the pan so the bottom crust would cook well. It was the best pie ever. I'm going to do this every time from now on.

I baked mine for 1 hour...maybe 50 minutes isn't quite enough.

I made it on Christmas Eve and it was on the counter overnight tightly wrapped in foil. I didn't put it in the fridge at all.

judgejudith1324913939.8471184 PostsRegistered 12/14/2005Omaha

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.


Giordan1324914148.4331928 PostsRegistered 8/5/2011
On 12/23/2011 proofer said:

Being in the frig. overnight it may thicken up. Afraid if you cooked it more your crust would be ruined. Had the same thing happen to me today with a from scratch choc. pie, it has thickened since it has been in the sev. hours. Figure they can eat in bowl!!!!!lol

I really like your idea.

Serve it warm in a bowl with French vanilla ice cream. Yummy!

Desertdi1324914734.22715993 PostsRegistered 7/14/2007Surface of the Sun

scoop it into goblets....top with whipped cream

Hooty1324935396.80719134 PostsRegistered 9/4/2006~War Eagle Country~

I agree with JudgeJudith, with it being runny, sounds like it didn't cook long enough! It should be firm!

Nightowlz1324937520.6679729 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

If it's still runny it needed to cook a little more. Also needs to cool completely. This is the recipe I use from the Betty Crocker cookbook I got when I got married. Stick a butter knife it & see if it comes out clean.

Pecan Pie

3 eggs

2/3 c sugar

1/2 t salt

1/3 c butter, melted

1 c light Karo syrup

1 c pecans

Beat eggs, sugar, salt, butter & corn syrup.

Stir in nuts.

Pour into pie shell.

Bake 55-60 mins. @375°

Recipe cooking time says 40-50 mins. In my oven it takes 55-60 mins

“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” Will Rogers

kachina6241324937838.16316312 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004New Mexico

You probably didn't bake it long enough. You should test with a knife before removing from the oven. It should come out clean if inserted in the center of the pie.

Barbarainnc1325007883.2673160 PostsRegistered 6/13/2006

This recipe stays firm and doesn't get soggy or liquidity like other Pecan Pie recipes. It has cornmeal as a secret ingredient to keep it firm. This is the only Pecan Pie I make. :) :)

Brenda's Pecan Pie

1 box of light brown sugar

1 stick of margarine, melted

4 eggs

2 Tablespoons of yellow cornmeal, plain, not self-rising

2 Tablespoons water

1 Tablespoon vanilla

1 teaspoon salt

2 cups chopped pecans

2 regular frozen pie shells, unbaked

Mix everything in a bowl and divide between the 2 pie shells. I put the pies on a sheet pan and baked them at 325* for 45 minutes. Let cool.

kitkom1325009685.5975646 PostsRegistered 10/6/2004

Don't you just love it when someone posts something and never comes back to at least thank all the posters for their suggestions/comments? {#emotions_dlg.mad}

"Happiness is Lake Charlevoix!"

bear1325029616.327420 PostsRegistered 11/12/2007

I have a degree in Home Economics....It has NOTHING to do with the crust or the brand of the crust. Check the temperature of your oven for accuracy. Do not buy the oven thermometers at the grocery store. These are junk. Go to a reputable kitchen store such a Williams-Sonoma or Sur La Table to purchase one. Adjust your temperature and time accordingly. Your next step is to have an instant read thermometer. This you can purchase at the grocery store. These are pretty cheap. Insert this into the center of the pie. It will be done when it reaches 200 degrees F. This is the correct temp. for a pecan pie. This will produce a perfect pie every time!Smile Happy Baking...

smhr661325096824.5472384 PostsRegistered 9/5/2010Laid Back and Mellow Small Town USA
On 12/27/2011 bear said:

I have a degree in Home Economics....It has NOTHING to do with the crust or the brand of the crust.


So, you are saying, I am "delusional"? That my pie crust experience is "bunk"? Oh, really? Well, I have to say, you really don't need a thermometer for baking a pie. I have made 100's of pies and never had a need for a thermometer. My grandmothers never knew what a thermometer was ( meat, candy or otherwise ) and they were excellent cooks. So, you are way off base in suggesting a baking thermometer. I do agree with your suggestion about checking the oven temperature. I also agree with the non-home economics posters about cooking the pie a little longer.

I only know this, I had a problem ( one time ) with using the Marie Callendar's pie shell when baking a pecan pie. I noticed the pie shell was much harder than Pillsbury's. I've used the Karo pecan pie recipe + Pillsbury's pie crust on several occasions with good results.

mature, dry, sensitive, makeup optional skin. keep it healthy with NIA24, MD Forte, physical sunscreen and Fancl cleanser.

sfnative1325100914.8135684 PostsRegistered 4/23/2007Portland, OR
On 12/26/2011 judgejudith said:

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.

Any pie or tart (not cake) that contains eggs, 3 in the case of the recipe I use, will need to "set up," as these are in the custard family. Once you're done mixing all of the ingredients in a bowl, take a took at it. Insert a large spoon and spoon up a big glop, then let it "drizzle" over the spoon back into the bowl. Yup. That's gonna be a pie that will need to set up. (This pie is nothing like a fruit pie, so the rules are different.)

I like the idea of placing pie pieces in a dish with ice cream, then cover with whipped cream.

San Francisco Giants
2014 World Series Champs!

bear1325110167.25420 PostsRegistered 11/12/2007

http://www.karosyrup.com/recipe_details.asp?id=485

So, you are saying, I am "delusional"? That my pie crust experience is "bunk"? Oh, really? Well, I have to say, you really don't need a thermometer for baking a pie. I have made 100's of pies and never had a need for a thermometer. My grandmothers never knew what a thermometer was ( meat, candy or otherwise ) and they were excellent cooks. So, you are way off base in suggesting a baking thermometer. I do agree with your suggestion about checking the oven temperature. I also agree with the non-home economics posters about cooking the pie a little longer.

I only know this, I had a problem ( one time ) with using the Marie Callendar's pie shell when baking a pecan pie. I noticed the pie shell was much harder than Pillsbury's. I've used the Karo pecan pie recipe + Pillsbury's pie crust on several occasions with good results.

Not saying you are delusional. But if you used the Karo recipe you will see that they too say to cook to 200 degrees F. I'm just saying to insure perfect results, just like candy, a thermometer is the way to go. Not everyone has cooked "100's of pies".

judgejudith1325128480.571184 PostsRegistered 12/14/2005Omaha
On 12/28/2011 sfnative said:
On 12/26/2011 judgejudith said:

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.

Any pie or tart (not cake) that contains eggs, 3 in the case of the recipe I use, will need to "set up," as these are in the custard family. Once you're done mixing all of the ingredients in a bowl, take a took at it. Insert a large spoon and spoon up a big glop, then let it "drizzle" over the spoon back into the bowl. Yup. That's gonna be a pie that will need to set up. (This pie is nothing like a fruit pie, so the rules are different.)

I like the idea of placing pie pieces in a dish with ice cream, then cover with whipped cream.


judgejudith1325129001.111184 PostsRegistered 12/14/2005Omaha
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 sfnative said:
On 12/26/2011 judgejudith said:

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.

Any pie or tart (not cake) that contains eggs, 3 in the case of the recipe I use, will need to "set up," as these are in the custard family. Once you're done mixing all of the ingredients in a bowl, take a took at it. Insert a large spoon and spoon up a big glop, then let it "drizzle" over the spoon back into the bowl. Yup. That's gonna be a pie that will need to set up. (This pie is nothing like a fruit pie, so the rules are different.)

I like the idea of placing pie pieces in a dish with ice cream, then cover with whipped cream.

I beg to disagree with you. Pies, puddings and custards all need to be cooked to a certain temperature in order to reach their full thickening potential as the poster bear stated. If you don't cook them long enough, they may thicken slightly, but no amount of "sitting around" is going to make them thicken.


smhr661325170602.322384 PostsRegistered 9/5/2010Laid Back and Mellow Small Town USA
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:

I beg to disagree with you. Pies, puddings and custards all need to be cooked to a certain temperature in order to reach their full thickening potential as the poster bear stated. If you don't cook them long enough, they may thicken slightly, but no amount of "sitting around" is going to make them thicken.

The thermometer method may apply to a novice/new cook, but for someone with 30 + years of baking experience, I don't think it is really neccessary.

I made a homemade coconut pie over the weekend and had excellent results. By the way, I didn't use a thermometer to check the custard part. Guess what? It turned out GREAT. By the way, I do profess to do little cooking, I must have a little Julia Child in me Smile.

Enough of this discussion. Back to the Beauty Board I go ( whistles all the way ).

mature, dry, sensitive, makeup optional skin. keep it healthy with NIA24, MD Forte, physical sunscreen and Fancl cleanser.

sfnative1325188897.375684 PostsRegistered 4/23/2007Portland, OR
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 sfnative said:
On 12/26/2011 judgejudith said:

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.

Any pie or tart (not cake) that contains eggs, 3 in the case of the recipe I use, will need to "set up," as these are in the custard family. Once you're done mixing all of the ingredients in a bowl, take a took at it. Insert a large spoon and spoon up a big glop, then let it "drizzle" over the spoon back into the bowl. Yup. That's gonna be a pie that will need to set up. (This pie is nothing like a fruit pie, so the rules are different.)

I like the idea of placing pie pieces in a dish with ice cream, then cover with whipped cream.

I beg to disagree with you. Pies, puddings and custards all need to be cooked to a certain temperature in order to reach their full thickening potential as the poster bear stated. If you don't cook them long enough, they may thicken slightly, but no amount of "sitting around" is going to make them thicken.


"Set-up" is a term meant to imply "while in the oven." No amount of allowing the pie to "sit" on a rack on the counter is going to affect a change. This applies to roasted meats, not to pies!

Also, have never used a thermometer to test any of my pastries, whether a pecan pie, cake or souffle, nor have I ever encountered directions with any recipe to "insert thermometer into center of pie..." I was previously the sole proprietor of a small commercial bakery and did just fine baking the way my grandmothers did. If you're baking a custard-like pie, as the anticipated time limit is reached, open the oven door, gently grab onto the pie plate or pan and shake a bit, the purpose of which is to note the amount of "wiggle." Color added to wiggle factor are the two deciding factors when baking such items.

San Francisco Giants
2014 World Series Champs!

judgejudith1325197086.0671184 PostsRegistered 12/14/2005Omaha
On 12/29/2011 sfnative said:
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 judgejudith said:
On 12/28/2011 sfnative said:
On 12/26/2011 judgejudith said:

I don't think of pecan pie as a pie that would normally need to "set up"...my guess is that you did not bake it long enough. Maybe your oven temperature is a little off, in any case, you needed to bake longer. Don't think that baking today is going to help, but it may and probably won't hurt. You may want to cover your crust edge with foil so that it doesn't brown too much.

Any pie or tart (not cake) that contains eggs, 3 in the case of the recipe I use, will need to "set up," as these are in the custard family. Once you're done mixing all of the ingredients in a bowl, take a took at it. Insert a large spoon and spoon up a big glop, then let it "drizzle" over the spoon back into the bowl. Yup. That's gonna be a pie that will need to set up. (This pie is nothing like a fruit pie, so the rules are different.)

I like the idea of placing pie pieces in a dish with ice cream, then cover with whipped cream.

I beg to disagree with you. Pies, puddings and custards all need to be cooked to a certain temperature in order to reach their full thickening potential as the poster bear stated. If you don't cook them long enough, they may thicken slightly, but no amount of "sitting around" is going to make them thicken.


"Set-up" is a term meant to imply "while in the oven." No amount of allowing the pie to "sit" on a rack on the counter is going to affect a change. This applies to roasted meats, not to pies!

Also, have never used a thermometer to test any of my pastries, whether a pecan pie, cake or souffle, nor have I ever encountered directions with any recipe to "insert thermometer into center of pie..." I was previously the sole proprietor of a small commercial bakery and did just fine baking the way my grandmothers did. If you're baking a custard-like pie, as the anticipated time limit is reached, open the oven door, gently grab onto the pie plate or pan and shake a bit, the purpose of which is to note the amount of "wiggle." Color added to wiggle factor are the two deciding factors when baking such items.

I personally have never used a thermometer when baking, and I've been baking pies, cakes, cookies, bread, etc for a good 50 years. Depending on the type of pie I can tell by appearance, smell, the knife test, and or the wiggle test. I assumed the original poster was less experienced as she was looking for a reason as to why her pie did not set up. In the case of an experience pie baker, I think an instant read thermometer might be a good training tool. I also think the poster who suggested that she check her oven temperature was on the right track. If you are going to bake you should know how accurate you oven's temperature is. Whether you are baking a pie or roast the wrong temperature will throw off your cooking time, and the result might be that your turket is not done when the rest of the meal is ready to go.

The point on custards and puddings was you have to bring them to a boil and then they will reach their full thickening potential.


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