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Todd English - "Green Pans" ?

Started 1311990038.12 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1312561441.09 by MaggieToo

My friend is building her kitchen and called me about the HSN special re: green pans.

Are they good? Has anyone used them? I have my CE and love the Technique HA line - but she has been watching the Cooking Event -

I suggested of course, what I have - but told her I would reach out and ask for input.

Thank you!

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RedConvert­ibleGirl1311990210.66314326 PostsRegistered 9/3/2005Pacific NW

I have his copperfused ones and they are my favorite pans ever!!! They're beautiful and they cook so well and clean up is easy.

I don't know how long I've had it - since last summer sometime.

Last edited on 7/29/2011

Last edited on 7/29/2011

When we shoulder the mantle of compassion no cry goes unheard and no wound goes unhealed. In this world of seemingly endless suffering we have to believe that no one is beyond hope of rescue. Scotlund Haisley, Animal Rescue Corps

CLEM1311990445.87312525 PostsRegistered 9/1/2008PA

I have his hard anodized green pans and really like them.

Just made dinner for friends. The cleanup was such a breeze.


ctinaw1311990554.471554 PostsRegistered 3/7/2005

HORRIBLE - they are great for about 6 months. Don't waste your money.

alicedee1311990782.393755 PostsRegistered 7/25/2010

I got one of the hard anodized frying pans back in December. We use it almost daily, and it works very well. It does clean up very easily.

Hildegarde­ Withers1311990999.47723377 PostsRegistered 7/3/2008

Why isn't Joy Mangano on with him anymore?


Hildegarde­ Withers1311991033.7723377 PostsRegistered 7/3/2008

Please state how long you've had the pans for. That would help.


meeoww1311991077.927179 PostsRegistered 7/15/2011
On 7/29/2011 ctinaw said:

HORRIBLE - they are great for about 6 months. Don't waste your money.

Ditto - I wouldn't buy anything that the loud-mouthed, obnoxious hag Joy Mangano sells.

CLEM1311991213.3312525 PostsRegistered 9/1/2008PA
On 7/29/2011 CLEM said:

I have his hard anodized green pans and really like them.

Just made dinner for friends. The cleanup was such a breeze.

I have had mine for over 2 years.


Maria Loui­sa1311991473.783579 PostsRegistered 7/5/2009

I got his try me small skillet green pan. It was great for just over a month. I mainly used it for eggs and always hand washed it. Did use it every day but then the coating on it started to crumble and fell off and ended up being unusable and I just tossed it away. Of course, it was just past my 30 day return plus the packaging that it was sent in was not one that you could reuse. It was a good price not sure if they still carry it. I believe that it was more then a couple years ago when I purchased it.

I've used the CE hard anodized many years and have had no problem with them. The only reason that I tried TE thought it would be better but I was so wrong. Am sticking with CE hard anodized should I decide I ever need any more pots or pans.

bunny~1311991571.461899 PostsRegistered 2/27/2011

Within the first year they were horrible. I cured them per instructions until I had to constantly had to use oil with them.

I gave them away and now use Command Performance.

What doesn't break us makes us stronger.

homedecor11311991623.352696 PostsRegistered 6/20/2005

TY all for the pros/cons. I will pass them on and she can make up her mind.

Like I said I have heard mixed reviews - both on here and HSN reviews.

(And I agree - he is obnoxious and JM is worse! Still don't know why she has to "scream" to get her point across - we can always adjust our volume!)

Thanks!

Angel181311992510.787451 PostsRegistered 1/24/2011

I would suggest to stay away from any "Green" cookware that uses ceramic or anything similar for their coating. According to Cook's Illustrated magazine, none of them performed as well as traditional nonstick and they say that Green cookware isn't ready for prime time. They've also been tested by Whitford, a nonstick company that rivals DuPont and even their best "green" nonstick coating isn't all that great. They have a chart on their website that shows how well their nonstick coating perform, and their green Fusion coating only ranks a 6/10, while many of their normal PTFE coatings are ranked 8/10 or higher.

Also some of the "glowing" reviews written on HSN are apparently fake as cooking.com found out. Don't know how much of that is true though.

I have personally used GreenPans and they aren't that great. The pots are fine, but the frying pans aren't.

Sunshine K­ate1311992812.74312235 PostsRegistered 11/13/2006The Beautiful Mountains & Western Sky

I have one of Todd English's hard anodized green pans that's called a "hot pot". It was sold in different sizes. It's one of my best pots ever! I don't think HSN sells it anymore though. It had rave reviews.

Respectfully ~
Kate

Angel181311992904.75451 PostsRegistered 1/24/2011

Here's what I found on the HSN boards about Green cookware:

Green skillets REVIEW


For those who are interested. Your mileage might vary.

Published September 1, 2009. From Cook's Illustrated.

Eco-friendly nonstick skillets promise to help the planet while they cook your
dinner. But
do any actually measure up?
products tested (listed alphabetically)

* Classicor Go Green Nonstick 11.5" Skillet
* Cuisinart GreenGourmet 12" Skillet with Helper Handle
* Demeyere-Resto 12.6" Ecoglide Frying Pan without Lid
* Earth Pan 12" Hard Anodized Skillet
* Greenpan Frypan 12.5"
* Scanpan Professional 12.25" Fry Pan
* Starfrit Alternative Eco Pan 11" Fry Pan
* Xtrema 10" Open Skillet

See Product Comparison Chart

With every product from the shopping bag to the SUV undergoing an
environmentally friendly
makeover, it’s no surprise that the nonstick skillet is getting its turn.
Cookware makers
have launched a variety of nonstick pans touted as “eco-friendly,” some also
promising
that their new coatings will last longer, work at higher temperatures, and
resist
scratches. But as our testing revealed, it’s not easy being both green and a
solid
performer. Furthermore, whether some of these pans are really any greener than
the old
nonstick is a big open question.

Traditional nonstick coatings use two controversial chemicals: PFOA and PTFE.
PFOA, or
perfluorooctanoic acid, is a processing agent widely used in manufacturing that
has been
detected in water, food, wildlife, and human blood samples. The Environmental
Protection
Agency cites it for causing birth defects in laboratory animals and has urged
that
companies eliminate it by 2015.

PTFE is polytetrafluoroethylene. Though inert, when heated above 660 degrees (a
range
easily reached if the pan is left empty over high heat), PTFE breaks down and
releases
toxic fumes that can birds and cause flulike symptoms in people.

Two of the new coatings (ceramic and silicone) are entirely free of these two
chemicals.
But a third type merely eliminates the most notorious chemical, PFOA. We rounded
up all
the “green” skillets available as open stock items in a 12-inch size (or the
closest to
it) in each of the three types. We took these eight pans and compared them to
our previous
Best Buy nonstick skillet with a traditional Teflon-style coating from WearEver
(it has
since been discontinued).
In each pan, we cooked several of the dishes that nonstick skillets do so
well—scrambled
eggs, fish fillets, and frittatas, along with steak and stir-fries—and rated the
pans on
how evenly they cooked the foods and how easily they released them. We used
metal utensils
on the pans to test manufacturers’ claims about scratch resistance; we also
monitored
their tendency to stain or discolor and the durability of their coatings. Since
we don’t
recommend spending a lot of money on nonstick pans because the coating gradually
wears
off, this was a particular concern. A well-designed pan was another requirement,
so we
also rated them on balance, weight, and shape.

Underachievers

Not a single one of these “green” pans was without flaws. In some, delicate eggs
burned,
thin fish fillets , and steak charred on the outside while remaining raw
within.
Others stained or transferred heat inconsistently. Some pans started to build
the browned
bits known as fond as we seared steak, indicating an unwanted sticking power.
Stir-fries
were more forgiving, but a few pans steamed the meat and left vegetables pallid
and rubbery.

To test claims made by some manufacturers that the pans could withstand metal
utensils, we
made frittatas and sliced them directly in the skillets with a chef’s knife,
then used a
metal pie server to remove each slice (a test we have conducted on regular
nonstick
skillets). While some models sustained shallower scratches than others, all
showed marks
and scrapes, just as the traditional nonstick pan did. (Despite manufacturers’
claims, we
recommend treating “green’’ skillets as carefully as you would any regular
nonstick pan;
do not use metal utensils.)

Overall, the performance of the new skillets was subpar compared with our
traditional
nonstick skillet. A pan’s strengths and shortcomings depended mostly on the type
of
nonstick coating.

Surface and Performance

Ceramic coatings are made by slowly baking a mixture of ceramic powder and water
or
solvent onto a base of stainless steel or aluminum. Because ceramics are
extremely
brittle, expanding and contracting at a different rate than the metal base they
are bonded
to, we expected that such coatings might prove less durable. Testing confirmed
our
suspicions; when we were done, the surface of one ceramic pan was even covered
with what
looked like burst bubbles.

Ceramic-coated aluminum pans had another flaw: Because aluminum is a rapid
conductor of
heat, these pans quickly became extremely hot. But due to the thinness of the
ceramic
coating, the pans could not retain heat once food was added, resulting in overly
slow
cooking and steaming rather than browning.

Silicone copolymer coatings, in which a fine layer of a silicone copolymer is
sprayed over
a metal pan, proved more resilient than ceramic coatings, but still wore off
within a few
days as we cooked and washed them repeatedly. While these pans reacted more
predictably to
temperature adjustment, steak did not release easily and left fond; eventually
food
even when we added oil, leaving a blackened mess. Despite this flaw, their low
marks on
durability, and their tendency to discolor and become scratched, these pans
still
outperformed the ceramic contenders.

The final category of skillets, whose coatings are PFOA-free but contain the
moisture-repellent PTFE, performed much as we expected, maintaining their
nonstick
properties well compared to other models. These pans easily released food and
browned
evenly during every test. Eggs cooked perfectly. Fish did not stick, nor did it
leave an
imprint. However, like traditional nonstick, these pans can emit dangerous fumes
from the
PTFE if left empty over high heat.

Not Ready for Prime Time

As we conducted cooking tests, we realized we don’t really care how good the
nonstick
coating is if the pan is uncomfortable to use. None of the skillets had a
flawless
design—if it was the right size, it was too heavy; if it was lightweight and
maneuverable,
the cooking surface was too small for many recipes. We had to conclude that
while the
engineers focused on new nonstick coatings, they forgot about the basic
requirement of a
comfortable, well-designed pan.

In addition, most of these pans are also just not as durable as traditional
nonstick. Hugh
Rushing of the Cookware Manufacturers Association (a trade association)
concurred with our
assessment. Based on testing the CMA has done in its own test kitchens, the
ceramic-coated
models are simply “not as well-performing,” Rushing said.

Furthermore, experts like Rushing remain unconvinced that these pans are really
“green.”
Because of their newer technology, ceramic- and silicone-coated skillets require
more
resources to manufacture than traditional nonstick pans. And how “green” can a
pan really
be that still contains at least one potentially harmful chemical, PTFE?
Rushing’s answer:
“Not very.” Until “green” skillet technology improves, we’re sticking with
traditional
nonstick or a well-seasoned cast-iron pan.

==================

RESULTS OF THE TESTING:

Recommended with Reservations
Scanpan Professional 12.25" Fry Pan

Steaks seared well and browned evenly on this pan’s generous surface area, which
was
gentle enough to cook fish and scramble eggs without sticking. Metal utensils
left slight
scratches, but overall this pan had the most durable surface of all the models
and
performed closest to traditional nonstick. Still, the pan was unbalanced, too
heavy, and
slightly oversized: At 12.25 inches, a standard 12-inch lid will not fit it.

* * * * * * * $129.95



Recommended with Reservations
Earth Pan 12" Hard Anodized Skillet

At first this pan easily released food, but after days of testing, we noticed
deterioration of the nonstick surface, fond that began to build up when we
cooked, and
light but visible scratches. However, the skillet felt comfortable, and sautéing
was quick
and easy, though a few testers felt the handle was a little low and awkward.
* * * * * * $39.95



Recommended with Reservations
Demeyere-Resto 12.6" Ecoglide Frying Pan without Lid

Far too heavy and cumbersome, but the nonstick quality was excellent. It took
noticeably
longer to heat than other skillets, but once the pan was at temperature, food
browned
evenly. Scrambled eggs turned out light and fluffy, though the coating became
severely
scratched when we used metal utensils.
* * * * * $139.99



Not Recommended
Greenpan Frypan 12.5"

This ceramic-coated aluminum pan performed extremely well starting out but
slipped as
testing went on. Eggs and fish released easily, but we struggled to cook steak
evenly. The
higher, more vertical sides and small cooking surface cramped food; it also
discolored and
became severely scratched. The comfortable, heat-resistant handle was one of the
few
bright spots.
* * * * * $84.95



Not Recommended
Cuisinart GreenGourmet 12" Skillet with Helper Handle

The extra handle came in handy on this heavy pan, but that feature couldn’t
outweigh its
generally subpar performance. Scrambled eggs to the sides and rivets. The
vertical
sides and smaller cooking surface crowded steaks, which burned on the outside
before they
were cooked through. However, stir-fry results were good and scratches and other
wear and
tear were minimal.
* * * * $69.95



Not Recommended
Starfrit Alternative Eco Pan 11" Fry Pan

The handle on this flimsy pan started to loosen after the first few tests, and
because it
is not heat-resistant, the pan couldn’t go in the oven. Temperature was hard to
control;
eggs . Steaks were crowded and steamed. Fish and ripped when we tried
to remove
it from the skillet. The pan sustained deep scratches.
* * * $33.60



Not Recommended
Classicor Go Green Nonstick 11.5" Skillet

During the first test, the interior deteriorated and chipped (after making
scrambled
eggs!). The results headed south from there. The small surface area made things
cramped,
food steamed, and the pan became terribly scratched.
* * * $32.24



Not Recommended
Xtrema 10" Open Skillet

This clunky, pottery-like skillet—made of 100 percent ceramic—barely functioned.
Food
consistently or, worse, burned. The coating was destroyed after one test.
Scrambled
eggs became so encrusted we had to soak the pan overnight. Steaks burned on the
outside
before cooking through.
* * * $99.99

-----------------

JBinRWC1311993646.088593 PostsRegistered 1/26/2008Northern CA

Maybe the early pans were not as good as the current version. Got an 8" frying pan during the launch. Cooked a fried egg and a boneless steak in the pan on the same day using the recdommended type of utensils. Ended up with several bad scratches in the non-stick coating. Sent it back and would not try another pan based on that experience. They may be better now but I'm not willing to waste money trying to find out.

Witchy Wom­an1312037881.0132695 PostsRegistered 12/17/2005

I have several. While I love the hard anodized EXTERIOR because it does not discolor, the interior sticks like crazy after a short time. I have had mine maybe two years. Unless you put a fair amount of oil in them now, everying sticks and...while they are not that bad to clean up, neither is plain stainless steel.

The only true non-sticks I have found are the black interior pans...and those are the one Joy Mangano will tell you are poison.

Once my current supply of "green" pans gets funky (and they are already scratched), I will not buy any more.

Overall, I don't like them and would not buy this brand again.

Oh, and the copper fused pans discolored in the dishwasher. Now, I normally will hand wash most pans, but one night I got lazy and put my small copper fushed skillet in the dishwasher and it completely changed the color of the exterior.

Still searching for the perfect nonstick (other than stainless steel with plenty of olive oil!).

Last edited on 7/30/2011

Last edited on 7/30/2011

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blondegirl1312038836.741786 PostsRegistered 7/21/2006
On 7/29/2011 Angel18 said:

I would suggest to stay away from any "Green" cookware that uses ceramic or anything similar for their coating. According to Cook's Illustrated magazine, none of them performed as well as traditional nonstick and they say that Green cookware isn't ready for prime time. They've also been tested by Whitford, a nonstick company that rivals DuPont and even their best "green" nonstick coating isn't all that great. They have a chart on their website that shows how well their nonstick coating perform, and their green Fusion coating only ranks a 6/10, while many of their normal PTFE coatings are ranked 8/10 or higher.

Also some of the "glowing" reviews written on HSN are apparently fake as cooking.com found out. Don't know how much of that is true though.

I have personally used GreenPans and they aren't that great. The pots are fine, but the frying pans aren't.

One of those glowing reviews, at least, is mine. I LOVE my greenpans and have had them for a number of years. One pan is from the first show. As an FYI, in 2012 I believe it is, teflon will no longer be used because it is unsafe and unhealthy. the newest upgrades to traditional nonstick may never work as well as a toxic chemical but it will be the only option. I am glad for that and so happy I have my green pans!

knittykitty1312040478.4471030 PostsRegistered 4/13/2007Gig Harbor, WA

I have one TE and several Cusinart green pans. I am convinced there's no such thing as a truly 'non' stick pan. You have to cook on lower temps as stated with these pans as they do cook hotter than other pans. I am fine with that and fine with the fact that if you cook too hot, things do stick.

What I wanted was easy clean-up (they are) and no noxious fumes (they don't) so I am very pleased with mine. I picked up my Cusinart's at BB&B with coupons inc 'buy 2 get 1 free' deal.

RedConvert­ibleGirl1312040945.20714326 PostsRegistered 9/3/2005Pacific NW
On 7/30/2011 Witchy Woman said:

Oh, and the copper fused pans discolored in the dishwasher. Now, I normally will hand wash most pans, but one night I got lazy and put my small copper fushed skillet in the dishwasher and it completely changed the color of the exterior.

You can't blame that on the pan, you're supposed to hand wash them.

When we shoulder the mantle of compassion no cry goes unheard and no wound goes unhealed. In this world of seemingly endless suffering we have to believe that no one is beyond hope of rescue. Scotlund Haisley, Animal Rescue Corps

nunnie1312041286.143253 PostsRegistered 1/16/2008Northeast Ohio
On 7/29/2011 Sunshine Kate said:

I have one of Todd English's hard anodized green pans that's called a "hot pot". It was sold in different sizes. It's one of my best pots ever! I don't think HSN sells it anymore though. It had rave reviews.

I have to agree with you, these are my favorite pots as well! And the bowl to keep them warm really works too.

MENTL1312042106.5771095 PostsRegistered 10/21/2006EARTH

They s u c k, don't waste your money. I threw them all away, stuff stuck to them and the coating got yucky after putting them in the dishwasher. HORRIBLE

Angel181312043842.99451 PostsRegistered 1/24/2011
On 7/30/2011 blondegirl said:
On 7/29/2011 Angel18 said:

I would suggest to stay away from any "Green" cookware that uses ceramic or anything similar for their coating. According to Cook's Illustrated magazine, none of them performed as well as traditional nonstick and they say that Green cookware isn't ready for prime time. They've also been tested by Whitford, a nonstick company that rivals DuPont and even their best "green" nonstick coating isn't all that great. They have a chart on their website that shows how well their nonstick coating perform, and their green Fusion coating only ranks a 6/10, while many of their normal PTFE coatings are ranked 8/10 or higher.

Also some of the "glowing" reviews written on HSN are apparently fake as cooking.com found out. Don't know how much of that is true though.

I have personally used GreenPans and they aren't that great. The pots are fine, but the frying pans aren't.

One of those glowing reviews, at least, is mine. I LOVE my greenpans and have had them for a number of years. One pan is from the first show. As an FYI, in 2012 I believe it is, teflon will no longer be used because it is unsafe and unhealthy. the newest upgrades to traditional nonstick may never work as well as a toxic chemical but it will be the only option. I am glad for that and so happy I have my green pans!

Didn't say that all of them were fake. Many were apparently.

And it's 2015 that the FDA wants the production of PTFE pans to be gone. Anyways, those coatings aren't as dangerous as they say if you use it correctly. Even NSF International certifies them to be safe for commercial use. And commercial kitchens standards are stricter than regular home kitchens.

Angel181312044245.297451 PostsRegistered 1/24/2011
On 7/30/2011 Witchy Woman said:

Still searching for the perfect nonstick (other than stainless steel with plenty of olive oil!).

Last edited on 7/30/2011

Last edited on 7/30/2011

Have you tried using carbon steel? It's similar to cast iron, but lighter and stick less than stainless steel.

chickenbutt1312044848.2524215 PostsRegistered 1/16/2006chickentown
On 7/30/2011 Angel18 said:

And it's 2015 that the FDA wants the production of PTFE pans to be gone. Anyways, those coatings aren't as dangerous as they say if you use it correctly. Even NSF International certifies them to be safe for commercial use. And commercial kitchens standards are stricter than regular home kitchens.

Exactly! That creepy Todd guy and Screamy Joy want to get everybody frothed up in a frenzy about the evil nonstick with all their lies about their stuff, that's all. They want to convince people that they need to cook at the temperature of the sun and their cookware will allow them to do that. The technology just isn't there yet but hopefully it will one day. Meanwhile using traditional nonstick, as long as you go by the rules, is plenty safe.

But, all that said, it's good that there are choices. Some people like the Green Pan products so I'm glad they can get it. I just hate to see the lies that are told in the course of selling it. There ARE emissions that come off this, just like any other, when they are heated at high temperatures.

Before they started pulling reviews out (and before all the shill reviews), the majority of the reviews were not good. They got wise quickly and kept changing the item numbers of the configurations, and deleting the old ones, so that the reviews would go away. Not so smart, however, when they got caught publishing fictitious reviews. heh

Bippity boppity BOOYAH!

forrestwolf1312050692.0036025 PostsRegistered 6/20/2010Deep in South Georgia

IMO, which will not even buy you a cup of coffee, people are still of the mindset, to cook everything on high heat. They do not realize that today's cookware is made for medium to lower heat. I have been using Caphalon and Cooks Essential HA for many years, and yes, I do mean CE, as that was the line before Techniques, and have never had any problems with sticking, flakes, fumes, or death of any birds! I use them in my dishwasher, and mine never look like what they show on TV!!!!!!!!! It can go into the oven, stove top, and nothing changes with it!!!!! I have read sooooooo many bad reviews with the green pan, and some from earth pans, and I will keep using what I have used for years, and I have never had to replace an item, so I don't have to buy a new set of cookware every time a new one comes out, but I must say, to each his own{#emotions_dlg.biggrin} Every has their favorites, and I understand your loyalty, as you have just read mine{#emotions_dlg.wub}

"For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack"
1895 Rudyard Kipling
EDUCATE........NOT ERADICATE

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