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Kitchen & Food Talk

Yeast expiration date....

Started 1265917911 in Kitchen & Food Talk | Last reply 1266378274 by mari610
I am fairly new to bread making - about 6 months. I just noticed my yeast expired in November. Is it still good or no? I dont want to risk a bad loaf as I am making cardamom bread for my dad's 70th birthday. He loves it! So, if anyone has any recipes with cardamom, feel free to post!
What are the rules on yeast? Is it ok after a few weeks or dont even use at all after the expiration.
Thanks so much!
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~ Tori ~

~ Tori ~

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Poodlepet12659189213650 PostsRegistered 9/21/2006Punta Gorda Florida
Tori, my inclination is to tell you to go buy a fresh jar....or you could enter "proofing yeast" into your web browser and check to see if it's alive.....but I would highly recommend you order some SAF yeast from King Arthur. There is no guess work with this-you can keep it for an indefinite time in your freezer (I decant into a jar and keep some in my fridge-but I've been told by the folks at King Arthur that you can use it straight out of the freezer).
This yeast is fool proof-and that's wonderful for new bakers: if your bread does not rise, you can look for other problems but at least you will know it's not your yeast!
Happy Baking!
Poodlepet

Foodie 71265920095740 PostsRegistered 3/9/2006
Tori,
Given that this is an "important" loaf of bread for you, I'm inclined to agree with Poodlepet, but I did find this on ask Yahoo.
It will probably be fine. Expiration dates assume worst case, not best. It is easy to test. Put a teaspoon of sugar in some tepid water (slightly warmer than skin temp), add a little of the yeast and stir gently. If the yeast comes to the top in 5-10 minutes, it is still alive and kicking.
That's an easy test and you won't waste the ingredients for a loaf of bread if you find the yeast is not good.
As for a recipe for cardamom bread, you didn't say whether you're making it from scratch or are looking for a bread machine recipe. Just Google "cardamom bread" and you'll find all kinds of recipes for cardamom bread, both regular and for a bread machine.
--
Foodie

gardenman126592986917092 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey
If you've kept the yeast frozen you can safely ignore the expiration date. Those dates are set for yeast that's stored at room temperature. If you store it frozen it will last indefinitely. I buy two pound blocks of yeast at BJ's and they're still fully active a full year or more past their expiration date as long as they're kept frozen.
--
Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Ripley10912659380989346 PostsRegistered 2/1/2006
Yes, if it's anywhere near the expiration date, I usually
throw the yeast out and use something newer (fresher).
> If you've kept the yeast frozen you can safely ignore
> the expiration date. Those dates are set for yeast
> that's stored at room temperature. If you store it
> frozen it will last indefinitely. I buy two pound
> blocks of yeast at BJ's and they're still fully
> active a full year or more past their expiration date
> as long as they're kept frozen.
gardenman, I don't buy blocks of yeast, but can you
just put the paper packets you buy in the store in the
freezer? I've never thought of that.....
--
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution, so it will not become the legalized version of the first." Thomas Jefferson

"A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." - Mark Twain

Hersheyzmom12659399962558 PostsRegistered 8/6/2008Back home in the Blue Ridge Mountains
I agree Ripley, I've used yeast that expired, and it just doesn't work. If you're gonna go to the trouble of making fresh bread, get some fresh yeast (that's good to know about freezing it!) :)

j marie12659634832945 PostsRegistered 9/9/2007
> If you've kept the yeast frozen you can safely ignore
> the expiration date. Those dates are set for yeast
> that's stored at room temperature. If you store it
> frozen it will last indefinitely. I buy two pound
> blocks of yeast at BJ's and they're still fully
> active a full year or more past their expiration date
> as long as they're kept frozen.
>
> --
> Fly! Eagles! Fly!
The dates are based on commercial practices which keep yeast open on the counter. It should be fine. I've kept yeast in the freezer for a couple of years and it works fine. Fresh yeast is a different issue, but I'm guessing the OP means dried yeast.

monketoes12659670562796 PostsRegistered 12/2/2007Heart of Dixie
I use the Rapid Rise and keep in fridge door.
Measure out what I need,
let come to room temp. about 10 min. or so...
and start making my bread.
But, for a special loaf...I would just get a new jar
to be sure...
I can only make bread with a bread machine...LOL
--
"You Can't Make a Silk Purse Out of a Sows Ear"

"You Can't Make a Silk Purse Out of a Sows Ear"

gardenman126598110917092 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey
You can freeze the individual packets or jars of yeast also. The yeast I buy is the Fleischman's active dry yeast. It comes in two vacuum sealed foil bags at BJ's. (What I described as blocks for they are very brick-like until opened.) Once I open a bag I'll pour it into a plastic storage container and keep the lid sealed and it lasts forever in the freezer. The last time I bought it the yeast cost $3 or $4 for two pounds. It's a great bargain compared to buying yeast in any other way. I only open one packet at a time and keep the other one frozen in its original wrapping until I need it. I've been using the yeast that way for many, many years (maybe 20?) and I've never had a single yeast related failure. (I've found lots of other creative ways to fail, but it's never been the yeast's fault.)
--
Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

vicTori126600149580 PostsRegistered 8/3/2009
Thank you so much for the replies, I bought fresh yeast!! I also ordered alot of things from King Arthur :O and cant wait to get my mixes and flours! What a great website!
--
~ Tori ~

~ Tori ~

Ripley10912660033069346 PostsRegistered 2/1/2006
gardenman, you sound like you have quite a bit of experience with
baking/cooking. Was this your previous career, or just a hobby?
Just curious.....
Wow.....cooking, football and gardening.....what a guy!:-D
--
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution, so it will not become the legalized version of the first." Thomas Jefferson

"A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." - Mark Twain

gardenman126601507617092 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey
Ripley. I've baked forever, but only as a hobby. I come from a long line of baking gardeners or gardening bakers. Both of my grandfathers were also bakers and gardeners. I love to take a few raw ingredients (yeast, flour, salt and water) and then see a loaf of bread come out from those few ingredients. There's nothing much better than a fresh loaf of bread right out of the oven.
I'm something of a renaissance man. There's not much I can't build, fix or create. If I want to eat something I'll find a recipe and try it out. If I like it, I add it to my repertoire. If I don't like it, I'll look for a different recipe and try again.
With any luck I'll get some production out of my blueberry bushes this year so I'll be whipping up a few blueberry pies. The strawberry and blueberry plants looked great the last time I saw them. (They're currently under about two feet of snow, but that's not bad.) I've got to build a bird-resistant cage around the plants this year to limit the catbirds access, but that shouldn't be too hard.
--
Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Ripley10912660216709346 PostsRegistered 2/1/2006
> With any luck I'll get some production out of my
> blueberry bushes this year so I'll be whipping up a
> few blueberry pies. The strawberry and blueberry
> plants looked great the last time I saw them.
Have you tried jams and/or jellies for your berries? They're
pretty easy to make.....I've made freezer jams.....
You're one in a million.....;-)
--
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution, so it will not become the legalized version of the first." Thomas Jefferson

"A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." - Mark Twain

msclassyla­dy7171266187451121 PostsRegistered 1/12/2007
gardenman ....... the yeast you buy at BJs..... it doesn't say it's breadmachine yeast.....do you use it in a breadmachine......and if you do ..... do you adjust the amount you use?
Thank you in advance.......
msclassylady717

j marie12662316362945 PostsRegistered 9/9/2007
> gardenman ....... the yeast you buy at BJs..... it
> doesn't say it's breadmachine yeast.....do you use it
> in a breadmachine......and if you do ..... do you
> adjust the amount you use?
> Thank you in advance.......
> msclassylady717
I'm replying mostly to bump this up so he'll see it.
But I buy Fleischman's in a similar 2 pack at Sam's, but I think it says "instant" on it. That would be bread machine yeast, and acc to the Henspberger book, it should be measured the same as SAF instant.

gardenman126623886117092 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey
I'm kind of old school and to me yeast is yeast. I've used this yeast in just about everything I've baked whether it's been in a bread machine, mixer, or made by hand and it's always done the job for me. All yeast really cares about is moisture, temperature and food and as long as it has the right amount of moisture, isn't too hot or too cold and has something to eat, yeast will do what it's supposed to do.
Manufacturer's like to slap different labels on yeast claiming one is better for this and another one is better for that, but in my experience, the yeast I buy does the job fine on everythng I bake. I just use the same amount as called for in the recipe and it works great for me.
--
Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

Ripley10912662683599346 PostsRegistered 2/1/2006
Yes, I just measure it out and use it, I don't differentiate. The only
time I've had a problem is when I've used a yeast that was nearing
its expiration date (but not expired).
--
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution, so it will not become the legalized version of the first." Thomas Jefferson

"A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." - Mark Twain

msclassyla­dy7171266285702121 PostsRegistered 1/12/2007
thank you all for your input...... I know I read a few recipes that some change the amount of regular yeast instead of using bread machine yeast...... but I didn't pay much mind to it.cause I figured I'd always buy breadmachine yeast... but gonna give the regular yeast a try..... I love using the breadmachine cause just measure.... dump..... and walk away....lol
you all are very helpful and friendly.......
msclassylady717

vicTori126634133980 PostsRegistered 8/3/2009
Next time we are in Sam's, I will pick up the yeast, now that I know I can freeze it! Thank you for the great info!
--
~ Tori ~

~ Tori ~

MamboMom1266373343133 PostsRegistered 9/1/2006
I've used yeast that is past it's expiration date but I've always proofed it first - as mentioned in a previous post. It always foamed and bubbled and I had no problem with the finished product.

mari610126637810055 PostsRegistered 9/27/2009
I also use the sam's instant yeast my husband loves it, he say is the best yeast ever, compare to active one .

mari610126637827455 PostsRegistered 9/27/2009
i think is really cheap for $4 a double pack,it last a long time

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