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Any Gardenias that are hardy in zone 5 ?

Started 1299175644.467 in In the Garden | Last reply 1299260728.987 by learner_2
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hi, I am trying to grow Gardeina indoors, I would love to grow some outside this year, please advise of any that would work in zone 5, (Chicago suburbs area ) thanks

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JustJazzmom1299180662.2728191 PostsRegistered 11/12/2007My garden, of course!!

Yes, they can be grown indoors as houseplants-- but be wary they can get spider mites due to the dry air in a home.

☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼

learner_21299188424.14395 PostsRegistered 4/12/2009

thanks justjazzmom, yes I am having that problem! I was going to ask in my next posting how to get rid of them. I just cut off some of the branches , not sure if that was the right thing.

Are there any gardenias that can be grown outside? (in zone 5)

JustJazzmom1299189194.17728191 PostsRegistered 11/12/2007My garden, of course!!
On 3/3/2011 learner_2 said:

thanks justjazzmom, yes I am having that problem! I was going to ask in my next posting how to get rid of them. I just cut off some of the branches , not sure if that was the right thing.

Are there any gardenias that can be grown outside? (in zone 5)

No, they are hardy to zone 8 and up outdoors-- unless you have a heated greenhouse maybe?

Spider mites are very difficult to get rid of on gardenias and most likely came in with the plant from where you bought it. Grocery stores are infamous for these little critters hitchhiking a ride on plants. Misting the plant helps keep the mites from enjoying that dry environment inside. Let me see if I can find some links. BRB

Care of indoor gardenias

From ehow website:

Spider mite damage-- Spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) belong to the arachnid insect family. Spiders, ticks and scorpions belong to the same family. Common colors are red, black, brown and green. The insects are very tiny and look like the head of a pin. It is estimated that they measure about 0.06 inch in size. They have four tiny legs on each side of their body, which is similar in appearance to a spider. A gardenia infected with the pests will exhibit yellowing leaves with a spotted appearance, fine spider webbing, curling of the foliage and even leaf loss. Blossoming may become stunted or non-existent in a severe infestation.


Spider mite infestation occurs year-round indoors, as well as outdoors during the hot, dry summer months. Gardenias planted in humid regions suffer from the infestations far less often than ones in dry regions of the country. The lack of humidity in the air appears to be why spider mite infestations are often more severe on gardenias grown indoors. The insects prefer a humidity of less than 60 percent, and they like the temperature to hover at 85 degrees F, in order to thrive and breed.
Under the leaves and along the gardenia's stems are the most common areas to find spider mites clustered. The insects s@ck the sap from the plant using their powerful mouths. Their voracious feeding causes bruising on the plant. The bruises appear as tiny yellow dots on the plant's leaves. In a heavy infestation, the leaf will take on a spotted look before turning completely yellow and falling from the gardenia.
<br /> The spider mite lays eggs under the leaves of the gardenia. A female lays 100 to 200 eggs. The fine webbing that the mites create help to camouflage and hide the tiny eggs. Egg gestation lasts only a few days, and then the larvae hatch. After the larvae stage, the insects will enter several nymph stages before reaching adulthood. The entire cycle takes place in less than 14 days. Once the spider mite reaches adulthood in 14 days, the eggs are laid and the life cycle repeats. The adult will live only 25 to 26 days before it dies. During all stages of the insect's life, it feeds heavily on the gardenia.
Control of spider mites on the gardenia entails washing the plant with a heavy stream of water to remove the eggs, mites and webbing. Once the infestation is removed, watch closely for any further signs that the mites have returned. Promptly wash the plant again if the mites re-infest it. Raise the humidity level to over 60 percent inside the house to keep mites at bay using a humidifier near the gardenias. Insecticidal control methods are also available from garden supply stores.
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Last edited on 3/3/2011

Last edited on 3/3/2011

☼The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. GBShaw☼

gardenman1299189626.30317109 PostsRegistered 6/30/2005Southern New Jersey

Zone 5 would be really pushing it. They're somewhat hardy here in zone 7, but even here you really need to help them out. You can buy a zone or two of protection by planting them in certain locations and in certain manners, but asking one to survive in zone 5 might be really pushing your luck. If you want to try, I'd plant it as close to the south facing wall of a masonry structure as I could reasonably get it. Ideally the masonry structure would absorb heat during the day and radiate it back to the plant at night. I'd mulch it with a dark mulch and provide wind protection by cocooning the plant in a burlap wrapped structure filled with leaves or a similar material. Even then you might need to be lucky to avoid serious dieback.

Fly! Eagles! Fly!

learner_21299260728.98395 PostsRegistered 4/12/2009

thank you gardenman and justjazzmom for all the great advice and info.!

Yesterday CF had a hardy yellow jasmine on air I ordered, really want to try something perennial and fragrant outside. Also found 'summer baby lilac ' on robertas list , ordered that too, they are both listed as fragrant, excited to trying them this summer!

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